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Information Brochure for

MASTER’S DEGREE PROGRAMMES 2011–2013

For any queries, regarding any part of the admission process, you may call TISS C.A.R.E. (Centre for Applicant Relationship and Engagement):

022 - 4011 0457

TATA INSTITUTE OF SOCIAL SCIENCES (Deemed to be University since 1964; under Section 3 of the UGC Act, 1956)

V.N. PURAV MARG DEONAR, MUMBAI 400 088 Phone: 91-22-2552500 E-mail: [email protected] http://www.tiss.edu

IMPORTANT DATES* I

Last Date for Issue of Forms by Post

October 11, 2010

II

Last Date for Receipt of Completed Forms at the Institute by Post and in Person

October 22, 2010

III

Last Date for Receipt of Completed Forms at the Institute from Remote Areas/Regions

October 30, 2010

IV Written Test (at Different Centres)

December 12, 2010

V

Announcement of Eligible Candidates on TISS website for Group Discussion/Personal Interview for all Programmes

January 24, 2011

V

Group Discussion/Personal Interview at TISS Mumbai Campus for all the programmes

March 17–23, 2011

VI

Announcement of Selection on TISS website for all the Programmes

April 06, 2011

Commencement of the Academic Session, 2010–2012 VII M.A. Education (Elementary)

May 09, 2011

All Other Programmes

June 13, 2011

* For Indian students only

Contents 1.

Tata Institute of Social Sciences: An Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

1.1

Academic Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

1.2

Teaching. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

1.3

Research . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

1.4

Extension and Field Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

1.5

Key Positions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

1.6

TISS Community . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

2.

Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013: General Information. . . . . . 5

2.1

Eligibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

2.2

Selection Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

2.3

Reservations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

2.4

Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes Cell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

2.5

Deputed Candidates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

2.6

Application Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

2.7

Written Test Schedule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

2.8

Facilities Available during Group Discussion and Personal Interview at the Institute . . 15

2.9

After Selection Formalities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

3.

Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013: Programme-specific Details . . 17

3.1

Intake of Students for the Academic Year 2010–2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

3.2

Foundation Courses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

3.3

M.A. Social Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

3.4

M.A. Social Work in Disability Studies and Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

3.5

M.A. Globalisation and Labour. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23

3.6

M.A. Human Resources Management and Labour Relations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23

3.7

M.A. Social Entrepreneurship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28

3.8

Master of Health Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

3.9

Master of Hospital Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

3.10 Master of Public Health in Health Policy, Economics and Finance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 3.11 Master of Public Health in Social Epidemiology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 3.12 M.A. Counselling. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 3.13 M.A. Development Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 3.14 M.A. Education (Elementary) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 3.15 M.A. Women’s Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 3.16 M.A./M.Sc. Habitat Policy and Practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46

3.17 M.A./M.Sc. Disaster Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 3.18 M.A. Media and Cultural Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 3.19 M.A. Social Work in Rural Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54

4.

Fees, Deposits and Other Charges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57

4.1 4.2

Total Proposed Fees for 2011–2013 Batch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Financial Assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58

5.

Students’ Support Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59

5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 5.6 5.7 5.8

Students’ Affairs Office . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Students’ Union. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Accommodation/Hostels. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Dining Hall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Health Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Counselling Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Health Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Sports and Recreation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61

6.

Information for International Students, Applying for Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62

6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.5 6.6 6.7 6.8

Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Eligibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Transfers and Change of Course . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Government of India Scholars. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Procedure for Admission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Fee Structure for International Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 Discipline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Examination and Award of Degrees and Diplomas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65

7.

Location, Access and Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66

71. 7.2

Mumbai Campus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Tuljapur Campus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67

1 Tata Institute of Social Sciences: An Introduction The Tata Institute of Social Sciences (TISS) was established in 1936, as the Sir Dorabji Tata Graduate School of Social Work to meet the emerging need for trained human service professionals. Accorded the status of a Deemed University in 1964, and funded by the University Grants Commission (UGC) since then, it is a postgraduate Institute of national stature today. Since its inception, the TISS has consistently worked for the promotion of sustainable, equitable and participatory development, social welfare and social justice. It has earned recognition as an institution of repute from different Ministries of the Government of India (GoI); State Governments; international agencies, such as the United Nations; and the non-government sector, both national and international. A high degree of freedom and autonomy shape the positive work ethos and creativity in the Institute facilitating strong linkages between education, research, field action and dissemination. In recognition of its social contribution and academic excellence, it was awarded a 5-Star rating by NAAC in 2002. In 2009, TISS was reaccredited by NAAC and awarded a Grade 'A' with a score of 3.88 out of 4. 1.1

ACADEMIC STRUCTURE

The TISS moved to a new academic structure in February 2006. It currently hosts 6 Schools, 4 Independent Centres, and 3 Resource Centres as indicated below: Schools School of Social Work with 6 Centres in Community Organisation and Development Practice; Criminology and Criminal Justice; Disability Studies and Action; Equity for Women, Children and Families; Health and Mental Health; and Social Justice and Governance. School of Social Sciences with 6 Centres in Development Studies; Human Ecology; Socio-legal Studies and Human Rights; Studies in Social Exclusion and Inclusive Policy; Studies in the Sociology of Education; and Women’s Studies. School of Management and Labour Studies with 4 Centres in Human Resources Management and Labour Relations; Labour Studies; Social Entrepreneurship; and Social and Organisational Leadership Development. School of Health Systems Studies with 4 Centres in Health and Social Sciences; Health Policy Planning and Management; Hospital Management; and Public Health. School of Rural Development School of Habitat Studies with 3 Centres in Urban Planning and Governance; Science Technology and Society; and Water Policy and Governance. n

n

n

n

n

n

2

Information Brochure: Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013

Independent Centres Centre for Lifelong Learning Centre for Media and Cultural Studies Centre for Research Methodology Jamsetji Tata Centre for Disaster Management n n n n

Resource Centres Computer Centre Publications Unit Sir Dorabji Tata Memorial Library n n n

1.2 TEACHING The TISS offers 17 Master’s Degree Programmes: Social Work; Social Work in Disability Studies and Action; Globalisation and Labour; Human Resources Management and Labour Relations; Social Entrepreneurship; Health Administration; Hospital Administration; Public Health in Health Policy, Economics and Finance; Public Health in Social Epidemiology; Counselling; Development Studies; Education (Elementary); Women’s Studies; Habitat Policy and Practice; Disaster Management; Media and Cultural Studies; and Social Work in Rural Development. It also offers and a Bachelor’s Degree Programme in Social Work, with specialisation in Rural Development, and an integrated M.Phil.–Ph.D. Programme in Social Work, Social Sciences, Health Systems Studies, and Management and Labour Studies. Additionally, it offers Diploma and Certificate programmes in various fields of study. It also has a lively Study in India programme, which provides opportunities for international students to study and experience Indian social realities through a blend of theory and field experiences. 1.3

RESEARCH

The role of academic institutions like TISS in conducting pioneering research rooted in the context of societal realties, and aimed at influencing policy and practice for positive social change, is widely acknowledged. During 2009–2010, a total of 141 research and documentation projects were ongoing at the Institute and funded by Central Ministries & State governments; NGOs & Trusts; national & international organisations and industry. Of these, 18 research projects were in multi-disciplinary areas while the remaining were anchored in various Schools/Centres. The ongoing researches at the Institute are in the areas of children and youth; climate change; community development; corporate social responsibility; dalits and tribals; disaster management; education; food security; governance; human rights; labour and migration; mental health; natural resources management; rural development; urban issues; and women and gender. 1.4 EXTENSION AND FIELD ACTION As a part of its extension activities, the TISS has been undertaking innovative Field Action Projects (FAPs) since the 1930s. These FAPs focus on the empowerment of marginalised groups, testing new approaches and strategies in response to changing social realities, facilitating development of field-based knowledge and practice–theory

Information Brochure: Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013

3

continuum, among others. They have played an integral role in the curriculum of social work education. Many important institutional innovations — such as Child Guidance Clinics, social workers/counsellors in Hospitals and Family Courts, Special Cells for Violence against Women in Police Stations, Childline — began as FAPs of TISS and were later absorbed into public institutional structures. 1.5

KEY POSITIONS Dr. S. Parasuraman

Director

M.Sc. (Pune), C.P.S. (IIPS), D.P.D. (ISS, The Hague), Ph.D. (Mumbai)

Dr. Lina Kashyap

Deputy Director

M.A., Ph.D. (TISS)

Dr. C.A.K. Yesudian M.A. (Madras), Ph.D. (TISS)

Dr. C. Sengupta M.A. (Calcutta), M.A., Ph.D. (Mumbai)

Dr. Surinder Jaswal M.A. (TISS), Ph.D. (London)

Dr. M. Kunhaman M.A. (Calicut), M.Phil. (JNU), Ph.D. (CUSAT)

Professor and Dean, School of Health Systems Studies Professor and Dean, School of Social Sciences Professor and Dean, School of Social Work Professor and Dean, School of Rural Development

M.A. (Mumbai), Ph.D. (Delhi)

Professor and Dean, School of Human Resources Management and Labour Studies

Dr. Subodh Wagle

Professor and Dean, School of Habitat Studies

Dr. Sharit Bhowmik

B.Tech. (IIT-B), Ph.D. (Delaware)

Dr. Anjali Monteiro M.A. (Pune), Ph.D. (Goa)

Dr. D.P. Singh M.Sc. (Vikram), Ph.D. (Mumbai)

Dr. Nasreen Rustomfram M.A., Ph.D. (TISS)

Dr. Jacquleen Joseph M.S.W. (Bharatidasan), M.Phil., Ph.D. (NIMHANS)

Dr. Lakshmi Lingam M.A. (Andhra), Ph.D. (IIT-B)

Dr. Arvind Tiwari M.A., Ph.D. (Sagar)

Professor and Chairperson, Centre for Media and Cultural Studies Professor and Chairperson, Centre for Research Methodology Professor and Chairperson, Centre for Lifelong Learning Associate Professor and Chairperson, Jamsetji Tata Centre for Disaster Management Professor and Dean, Research and Development Professor and Dean, Students' Affairs

4

Information Brochure: Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013

Dr. Muttayya Koganuramath

Librarian

M.L.I.Sc., M.Sc., I.M. (Sheffield), Ph.D. (Karnataka)

Dr. G.G. Wankhede M.A., B.Ed. (Marathwada), M.Phil., Ph.D. (JNU)

Professor, School of Social Sciences, Liaison Officer (SC/ST Cell)

M.A. (Utkal), M.Phil., Ph.D. (TISS)

Associate Professor and Chairperson, International Students' Office

Dr. Neela Dabir

Registrar

Dr. Bipin Jojo

M.S.W. (Mumbai), Ph.D. (SNDT, Mumbai)

Mr. H.G. Bhise

Deputy Registrar

M.Com. (Shivaji), LL.B. (Mumbai)

Mr. D.K. Shetty

Deputy Registrar

B.Com. (Ranchi), PGD in PM&IR (XISS)

Ms. Janaki Ramadas

Deputy Registrar

M.A. (SNDT)

Ms. Rajee Menon

Deputy Registrar

B.Com. (Mumbai)

Mr. K.S. Sadegaonkar

Deputy Registrar

M.Com. (Marathwada)

1.6

TISS COMMUNITY

The Institute is home to nearly 160 faculty members who are consistently involved in teaching, research, policy making and institution building. They are supported by 250 technical and administrative staff members and reach out to nearly 1,500 post-graduate and doctoral students at any one time. The TISS community extends far beyond, encompassing an extensive network of partners, former faculty, researchers, activists, and alumni across the development community worldwide.

2 Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013: General Information Candidates can apply and appear for the TISS National Entrance Test for a maximum of three programmes. 2.1

ELIGIBILITY

(a)

A Bachelor’s Degree of a minimum of 3 years duration or its equivalent (under the 10+2+3 or 10+2+4 or 10+2+2+1 year bridge course pattern of study or any other pattern fulfilling the mandatory requirements of 15 years formal education) from a recognised university, in any discipline. OR

(b)

Candidates who will complete all the requirements of their final year Bachelor’s Degree examinations by Saturday, June 11, 2011, are also eligible to apply to all the programmes, except the four programmes offered by the School of Health Systems Studies; provided they have successfully completed their first and second years, if the degree course is of 3 years; and the first, second and third years, if the degree course is of 4 years. Candidates applying for the M.A. Education (Elementary) programme should complete all the requirements by May 8, 2011. In such cases, admission to any of the Master’s Degree Programmes of the Institute will be provisional. If a provisionally admitted student fails in the final year examination, the offer of provisional admission automatically stands cancelled.

(c)

Candidates applying for the Master of Public Health in Health Policy, Economics and Finance; and Master of Public Health in Social Epidemiology Programmes should have (i) A Master’s Degree in any discipline, or (ii) A Bachelor’s Degree in medicine/para-medical courses.

(d)

Candidates who are in their final year Bachelor’s Degree Programme are not eligible to apply for admission to any of the Master’s Degree programmes, conducted by School of Health Systems Studies, i.e., Health Administration; Hospital Administration; Public Health in Social Epidemiology; and Public Health in Health Policy, Economics and Finance.

(e)

Candidates applying for the Master in Habitat Policy and Practice should have a Bachelor’s Degree in Engineering, Architecture, Management, Physical Sciences, Geography, Planning, Law, or Social Sciences, with some inclination towards habitat related issues/sectors.

(f)

Medical graduates should complete their internship on or before Saturday, June 10, 2011. Otherwise, their candidature/admission stands cancelled.

6

Information Brochure: Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013

2.1.1 Instructions for Determining Eligibility to Apply i)

‘Pass Class’ in the Bachelor’s Degree pursued by the applicant will be taken for determining his/her eligibility.

ii)

Candidates who are in the final year of their Bachelor’s Degree programme, but have not passed in all the courses (main/major/subsidiary, etc.) of first and second years (if the Degree is of 3 years duration) and first, second and third years (if the Degree is of 4 years duration) on the day of applying for the programme are not eligible to apply for any Master’s Degree programme of the Institute.

iii)

Candidates who have been declared as failed in the final year examination are not eligible to apply for any of the Master’s Degree Programme of the Institute, unless they pass their Bachelor’s Degree examination on the day of applying for any of the programmes.

iv)

Eligibility, once determined on the basis of the information given by the candidate in the Application Form, shall be final for the purpose of test/interview/selection. However, in case it is found that the information furnished by a candidate is incorrect or misleading or ineligibility being detected before or after the test/interview/selection/admission, his/her candidature will be cancelled.

v)

If a provisionally admitted student fails in the final year of his/her Bachelor’s Degree Examination and even if he/she has applied for re-evaluation at the university/college, he/she will not be allowed to continue the programme as the offer of provisional admission stands automatically cancelled on his/her failure in the final year examination.

2.2

SELECTION PROCEDURE

2.2.1 Weightage for the Different Components Sl. Programme No.

Written Test

Group Discussion

Personal Interview

Total

1.

Social Work

75

25

70

170

2.

Social Work in Disability Studies and Action

100



70

170

3.

Globalisation and Labour*

100



70

170

4.

Human Resources Management and Labour Relations

70

30

70

170

5.

Social Entrepreneurship

100



70

170

6.

Health Administration

100



70

170

7.

Hospital Administration

100



70

170

8.

Public Health in Health Policy, Economics and Finance

100



70

170

9.

Public Health in Social Epidemiology

100



70

170

10.

Counselling

70

30

70

170

11.

Development Studies

100



70

170

7

Information Brochure: Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013 Sl. Programme No.

Written Test

Group Discussion

Personal Interview

Total

12.

Education (Elementary)

100



70

170

13.

Women’s Studies

100



70

170

14.

Habitat Policy and Practice

100



70

170

15.

Disaster Management

100



70

170

16.

Media and Cultural Studies

100



70

170

17.

Social Work in Rural Development

100

30

70

170

Note:

* The selection procedure and weightage given here is for candidates from non-trade union or membership- based organisations who are applying to the M.A. Globalisation and Labour programme. Candidates sponsored by trade unions/membership-based organisations will only have to appear for the PI.

(a)

Written Test: The Written Test is in two parts. Part I is the Common Objective Test for all the programmes which consists of 3 sections: (i) General awareness/knowledge about current/contemporary social issues; (ii) Analytical/logical reasoning and quantitative ability; and (iii) Verbal reasoning. The duration of the test is 45 minutes. Part II of the Written Test is the “Programme-Based” test, and the duration is 60 minutes for all the courses. Part II of the Written Test for each programme aims to assess the following: Social Work

Caselets: Social awareness and sensitivity to core and civic issues. Ability to take positions on issues.

Social Work in Disability Studies and Action

Descriptive Test: Awareness of social issues and sensitivity to people, problems and situations will be assessed through analytical writing of an essay.

Globalisation and Labour

Objective Test: Awareness about Globalisation, Labour and Society

Human Resources Management and Labour Relations

Objective Test: Data Interpretation Test, Data Sufficiency Test, Reading Comprehension relating to business, and HR issues, Business Knowledge, Foundation of Management (Economics, Sociological and Psychological).

Social Entrepreneurship

Objective Test: Social Entrepreneurship Aptitude Test

Health Administration

Section I: Descriptive Test Section II: Objective Test

Hospital Administration

Section I: Descriptive Test Section II: Objective Test

Public Health in Health Policy, Economics and Finance

Section I: Descriptive Test

Public Health in Social Epidemiology

Section I: Descriptive Test

Section II: Objective Test

Section II: Objective Test

8

Information Brochure: Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013 Counselling (Equal Weightage for both sections)

Section I (Descriptive Test): Awareness of social issues and sensitivity to people, problems and situations will be assessed through analytical writing of an essay. Section II (Subject Knowledge Test): An objective test to assess knowledge in the fields of General Psychology, Child/Human Development and Social Work.

Development Studies

Objective Test: Analytical Ability, Quantitative Reasoning. Descriptive Test: Questions on Contemporary Social and Development Issues.

Education (Elementary)

Descriptive Test: Awareness about Issues in Education

Women’s Studies

Descriptive Test: Awareness of and reflection on women’s issues in India, Analytical capacities and sensitivity to social concerns and issues

Habitat Policy and Practice

Objective + Descriptive: Political & Social Awareness, Language Competency and Reasoning & Aptitude for Sector

Disaster Management

Descriptive Test: Analytical Abilities and Awareness about Current Issues

Media and Cultural Studies

Descriptive Test: Social sensitivity and awareness of social issues, critical thinking, Creativity and ability to think out of the box, Language competence in English, and Ability to read and comprehend texts.

Social Work in Rural Development

Descriptive Test: Rural issues Caselets: Social awareness and sensitivity to care, and civic issues related to rural areas. Ability to take position on issues.

Note:

Model question paper for each of the programme will be placed on TISS website on September 10, 2010.

(a)

Group Discussion (GD): Group Discussions and Personal Interviews will be held in Mumbai for all programmes except M.A. Social Work in Rural Development, which will be held in the TISS Tuljapur Campus. The GD aims at the assessment of knowledge about contemporary issues in the field and sensitivity to social issues expressed orally in English and/or in Hindi in a group situation. The time allotted is 20 minutes for the M.A. Social Work programme and 25 minutes for other programmes (Counselling and Human Resources Management and Labour Relations). For M.A. Counselling, the GD activity will have behavioural games, and observation thereof to help determine aspects of interpersonal interactions and relations, and communication skills.

(b)

Personal Interview (PI): The candidate is also expected to be acquainted with the programme for which he/she has applied for, as questions may be asked on the topic during the PI. The M.A. Social Work in Disability Studies and Action candidates will be assessed for knowledge and sensitivity towards persons with disability and issues related to the field.

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9

For M.A. Counselling candidates, aspects of subject knowledge, motivation, career goals and aspirations, and other non-academic details such as hobbies, extra-curricular interests and previous job experience will be determined during the PI. 2.2.2 Eligibility for Group Discussion and/or Personal Interview Short-listing of candidates for the GD and/or PI will be based on cut-off marks to be decided later by the Institute. Only short-listed candidates will be sent call letters for GD and/or PI to be held in Mumbai, with the exception of the short-listed candidates for the M.A. Social Work in Rural Development, which will be held in TISS Campus in Tuljapur. Important: F

For M.A. Social Work: General category candidates must score at least 45% and SC/ST/OBC/KM candidates must score at least 35% in the Written Test to be considered eligible for GD and PI.

F

For M.A. Education (Elementary) : Candidates short-listed for the PI will be required to either download or submit online the Detailed Application Form, which will be available at www.tiss.edu after declaration of Written Test results on January 23, 2011. They are required to bring the filled in Detailed Application Form along with photocopies of all documents and also the original documents for verification and 2 passport-sized photographs (the list will be available on the TISS website) to the Interview Centre. No candidate will be allowed to appear for the PI without submitting the Detailed Application Form in time along with required documents.

F

For M.A. Disability Studies and Action: Preference will be given to candidates who have a graduate degree in Social Work, Psychology, Special Education, Occupational Therapy, Physiotherapy, Speech Therapy, and disability rehabilitation-related fields. Graduates with at least 2 years experience in the field of disability or social welfare will be preferred.

F

For all Programmes: Candidates short-listed for GD/PI will be required to submit online the Detailed Application Form, which will be available at www.tiss.edu after declaration of Written Test results on January 24, 2011. They are required to send a hard copy of the filled in Detailed Application Form along with photocopies of all documents and two passport-sized photographs (details will be available on the TISS website) Friday, February 19, 2011. No candidate will be allowed to appear for the GD/PI without submitting the Detailed Application Form in time.

2.3

RESERVATIONS

Reservation of seats is as per GoI requirements. That is, 15% for Scheduled Castes, 7.5% Scheduled Tribes and 27% for Other Backward Castes (Non-Creamy).

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Information Brochure: Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013

Persons With Disability: 3% seats as applicable will be considered in the Master’s Degree Programmes for PWD of which 1% each is reserved for persons with (a) Low Vision/Blindness, (b) Hearing Impairment, and (c) Locomotor Disability/Cerebral Palsy. Kashmiri Migrants: Subject to the GoI directives. 2.4

SCHEDULED CASTES AND SCHEDULED TRIBES CELL

The Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes Cell was established at the Institute as per GoI and UGC directives with the honorary position of the Liaison Officer occupied by a senior faculty member. The Cell facilitates the overall welfare of the students, staff and faculty belonging to these communities. The Cell will organise a pre-admission orientation programme for all SC, ST, OBC (Non-Creamy Layers) and minority candidates between November 12–14, 2010, in Chennai, Delhi, Guwahati, Hyderabad, Kolkata and Mumbai, to help them prepare for the TISS National Entrance Test. This Cell will also organise post-admission orientation programme for new students at the beginning of the academic session. Further, various coaching classes are conducted on life skills, personality development, writing and presentation skills, etc. Interactive sessions and informal meetings with students are also conducted to help them deal with personal, social and academic problems. Issues relating to Persons with Disability are also looked after by the Cell. Eligible candidates are required to choose the nearest centre for the orientation programme. 2.5

DEPUTED CANDIDATES

In the case of Government Officers/employees from Departments of Education/ SCERTs/DIETs, teachers and resource persons applying for the M.A. Education (Elementary) programme, filled application forms may be sent via the relevant authority nominating the candidates. The selection of such candidates will be through a suitable screening process comprising documentary evidence of interest and motivation for the programme and/or interview. Officers for other programmes deputed by the Central and State Governments and autonomous organisations for studying any of the Master’s Degree programmes will have to undergo a PI. In the case of Defence Personnel applying for M.A./M.Sc. in Disaster Management, the eligible candidates will be called for a Written Test at TISS, and, if found eligible, for the PI also at TISS. 2.6

APPLICATION PROCEDURE

2.6.1 How to Obtain the Application Form All candidates are required to apply online through the E-application only, available on the Institute's website www.tiss.edu.

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11

Candidates applying through the online mode should pay Rs. 800/- (if applying for one programme), Rs. 1600/- (if applying for two programmes) and Rs. 2,400/- (if applying for three programmes) by submitting a prescribed challan to any branch of the State Bank of India (this challan can be downloaded from the TISS website). The portion of the prescribed challan marked for TISS should be sent along with the application and the portion marked for candidate should be preserved till the GD/PI gets over. The candidate will be able to download the challan once they fill up the complete details of the application form and before taking out a print of the filled-in application. Please note that the SBI will charge Rs. 50/- as their processing fee, which cannot be adjusted against the application fee. For candidates applying online, payment has to be made only through the SBI, and the payment challan has to be submitted to the Institute along with the Application Form. If payment is made via demand draft, pay order or any other mode, the application will be rejected and no communication to this effect will be sent to such candidates. Candidates from remote places where no Internet and telecommunication facilities are available can get OMR-based application form from the Institute by following the instructions given below: (A)

Please prepare a Demand Draft from any branch of the State Bank of India (SBI) drawn in favour of the Tata Institute of Social Sciences, payable at SBI, Deonar, Mumbai (Branch Code 03109) for Rs. 800/- (if applying for only one programme), Rs. 1600/- (if applying for only two programmes), or Rs. 2400/- (if applying for three programmes).

(B)

Please send the Demand Draft to the Assistant Registrar (Academic) of the Institute along with a self-addressed (A4-sized) cloth-lined or thick envelope with a postal stamp of Rs. 50/-, and a request letter containing details of address, contact number, etc. Requests coming without the postal stamp and Demand Draft will not be accepted.

The Institute has the right to not send the OMR-based application to candidates who are not from remote areas place. Please note that the money will not be refunded. Unemployed Scheduled Caste/Scheduled Tribe candidates, whose parent's/guardian's income is less than Rs. 1 lakh (Rupees one lakh only) are exempt from paying the Application Fee. They should apply online through the E-application, and if they are from remote places, they can send a request letter without the payment challan and stamped envelope, but with a request letter, a plain self-addressed envelope and copies of Caste and Income Certificates attested by any School headmaster or a Principal of College or a gazetted officer. Requests received without the above Certificates will be rejected and no communication will be sent in this regard. 2.6.2 How to Submit the Filled-in Application The filled-in application (either OMR-based application or printed form of E-application) should be sent to "The Assistant Registrar (Academic), Tata Institute of Social Sciences, V.N. Purav Marg, Deonar, Mumbai 400 088" along with the following documents

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Information Brochure: Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013

(a)

One passport size photograph.

(b)

Bank Challan: Portion of challan marked for TISS (stamped by the SBI branch where the processing fee was paid).

(c)

Income Certificate: All candidates should compulsorily send the income certificate of their parents/guardians in the form of salary certificate issued by their employer OR previous year's Income Tax return filed by the parents OR pension order OR income certificate issued by the employer on the company's letterhead. Applications received without proof of income will not be considered and the processing fee will not be refunded. Candidates belonging to SC/ST category and whose parent's/guardian's income is below Rs. 1 lakh need not send the challan, but should send the attested copy of income certificate for the year 2009-2010 and the caste certificate. Candidates whose parents' income during 2009-2010 is more than Rs. One lakh should send the challan and also the caste and income certificates. The Income certificate should have been issued by a Revenue Officer of the respective state government. Certificates issued by the Talati or MLA or MP or any official who are not from the Revenue Department will not be accepted.

(d)

Final Year Marksheet: Candidates who have completed their graduation should send either a copy of the final year marksheet showing their results or provisional/ completion certificate issued by the college/university or degree certificate or any other certificate proving successful completion of graduation.

(e)

Bonafide Certificate: Candidates pursuing final year of degree should send a bonafide certificate issued by the Principal/Vice-Principal/Dean or any authorised official of their college.

SPECIMEN COPY OF BONAFIDE CERTIFICATE Assistant Registrar (Academic) Tata Institute of Social Sciences Mumbai

date : ______________

This is to certify that ………………………………………………….. is a bonafide student of this college and is pursuing his/her final year degree. He/she has successfully completed his/her first and second year examinations and no backlog or paper left unattended in his/her first and/or second year examinations.

Signature of Principal with date and College/Institute's stamp

Information Brochure: Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013

(f)

13

OBC (NC) Certificate: OBC candidates from the creamy layer are treated as general candidates. Candidates belonging to OBC (non-creamy layer status) should send the community and non-creamy layer certificate issued by an official of the Revenue Department of the respective state government. They should also enclose the income certificate/income tax return filed by their parents/guardians. All OBC (NC) candidates have to attach a declaration with regard to their status, and applications received without any of the above mentioned documents, will be rejected. Please note that the non-creamy layer certificate issued before 23rd October 2007 will be treated as outdated and such candidates will be treated as general candidates though they may belong to OBC (NC). DECLARATION/UNDERTAKING BY OBC CANDIDATES ONLY I, _______________________________________________, son/daughter of Shri/Smt. ____________________________, resident of village/town/city ________________________ district ________________________________in the state of ____________________ hereby declare that I belong to the community of _____________________ which is recognised as a Backward Class by the Government of India** for the purpose of reservation in education as per orders obtained in Department of Personnel and Training Office Memorandum No. 36012/22/93-Estt. (SC/ST), dated 8th September, 1993. It is also declared that I do not belong to persons/sections (Creamy Layer) mentioned in Column 3 of the Schedule to the above referred Office Memorandum dated 8th September 1993, which is modified vide Department of Personnel and Training Office Memorandum No. 36033/3/2004, Estt.(Res.) dated 9th March, 2001. Signature of the Candidate Place : Date : ** Please refer to the website of National Commission for Backward Classes (NCBC) and confirm whether the community that you have mentioned is listed in your respective state list and mention the code number of the community into the bracket for the purpose of speedy scrutiny.

(g)

KM and PWD Certificate: Candidates belonging to Kashmiri Migrants (KM) and Person with Disability (PWD) should attach certificates giving proof of their status. The certificates for PWD should indicate a minimum 40% of disability.

Important F

The last date for submission of application at the Institute is 22nd October 2010. For those candidates from very remote areas/regions such as North-East and Jammu and Kashmir, etc., the last date is 31st October 2010.

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Information Brochure: Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013

F

A candidate can apply for a maximum of three programmes only.

F

Use only one application form, even if applying for more than one programme.

F

Programmes and examination centres once chosen cannot be changed. Also adding or deleting any programme is not allowed once the application form has been submitted.

F

Candidates submitting E-application in multiple numbers will be disqualified.

F

Processing fee paid by the candidates will not be refunded if they are found ineligible for any programme.

F

Incomplete application forms will be rejected.

F

Applications received after the due date will not be considered and the processing fee paid will also not be refunded.

2.7

WRITTEN TEST SCHEDULE

The Written Tests for all programmes will be held on December 12, 2010, at the following places: Region Northern Region

Place

Eastern Region

Bhubaneswar, Guwahati, Kolkata, Patna, Ranchi

Western Region

Ahmedabad, Mumbai, Nagpur, Pune

Southern Region

Bengaluru, Chennai, Hyderabad, Kochi

Note:

Bhopal, Chandigarh, Delhi, Jaipur, Lucknow, Varanasi

The Institute may cancel any test centre and/or assign a nearby centre instead of the centre indicated by the candidate, if situation demands.

Admit Card: The Admit Card will generally be sent on the first week of December to the e-mail of the candidate. However, candidates who have not received their admit card by December 8, 2010, may register their complaint by sending a mail to [email protected] tiss.edu. Candidates who registered their complaints will be sent a duplicate admit card a day prior to the entrance test at his/her respective centre. No duplicate admit card will be issued on the day of the written test. The GD and/or PI for all the programmes will be held at the Mumbai Campus from March 17–23, 2011. GD/PI for M.A. Social Work in Rural Development will be held at the Tuljapur Campus of TISS. The actual date of the GD and/or PI of a candidate will be put up on the TISS website and will also be intimated to the candidate through email. Shortlisted candidates are requested to contact the Section Officer (Admissions), in case they do not receive any mail with regard to date of GD/PI at least by March 3, 2011. Request for change in the date for the Written Test will not be considered. However, a change in the dates for GD and/or PI may be considered, if the date of GD and/or PI at the TISS clashes with the date of entrance test of another Institution or the date of final year examination of the candidate. However, the candidate must produce documentary

Information Brochure: Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013

15

evidence for this. Please note that the changed date for GD and/or PI will be within the time schedule announced by TISS only. 2.8

FACILITIES AVAILABLE DURING GROUP DISCUSSION AND PERSONAL INTERVIEW AT THE INSTITUTE

2.8.1 Dining Hall Coupons can be purchased from the Cash Counter and the Hostel In-charge, if applicants wish to have tea/lunch in the Dining Hall of the Institute. 2.8.2 Facilities for SC and ST Candidates Eligible for GoI Post-Matric Scholarship ii) Reimbursement of Travelling Allowance (TA), etc.: If the SC/ST candidates, appearing for the Written Tests of any of the Institute’s Master’s Degree programmes for the first time, are unemployed, and their parent’s/guardian’s income was Rs. One lakh or below, during the financial year 2009–2010 and have submitted a certificate to this effect, they will be provided to and fro travel expenses (Second Class Railway or State Transport Bus fare) immediately after the Written Test is over at every centre. The reimbursement of the travel expenses will be subject to their submission of the original tickets. It will be the responsibility of the SC and ST candidates to fill in the TA form provided along with a photocopy of the call letter for the Written Test before they appear for it and collect the money as soon as the test gets over. ii)

Reporting at the Institute for GD and/or PI: SC/ST candidates, who are eligible for such facilities, should report at the Institute only after receiving the call letter/mail for GD and/or PI. They will be reimbursed to and fro travel expenses (Second Class Railway or State Transport Bus fare).

iii)

SC/ST candidates, who have already availed of such facilities, but were not selected in a previous attempt and who have been called for the test again will not be reimbursed their travel expenses. The boarding, lodging and travelling expenses incurred by them during the Written Test at the Centre, and the GD and/or PI at the Institute will be reimbursed only if they are selected.

iv)

SC/ST candidates, who have received financial assistance to enrol for a Master’s Degree programme of the Institute in one field, will not be eligible for similar facilities, if they apply for another Master’s Degree programme of the Institute.

v)

SC/ST candidates who, after passing one level of education, are studying in the same level of education in a different subject, e.g., B.Sc. after B.A. or B.Com. after B.A. or M.A. one subject after M.A. another subject will not be eligible for the GoI Post-Matric Scholarship.

vi)

SC/ST candidates who, after having completed their educational career in one professional line, continue professional studies in a different line, e.g., LL.B. after B.A./B.Ed., will also not be eligible for the GoI Post-Matric Scholarship.

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Information Brochure: Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013

Notes: l. SC and ST students in employment, whose pay are protected during the period of their study, and SC and ST students who have already availed of the GoI Scholarship for a professional course of a University will not be eligible for the GoI Post-Matric Scholarship. They will, therefore, be required to pay all the fees, deposits and other charges like general students. 2. All SC and ST students are required to pay the annual premium of Group Mediclaim Policy at the time of admission.

2.8.3 Government of Maharashtra Freeship SC, ST and OBC students from Maharashtra State only whose parents’/guardian’s income was more than Rs. One lakh in the 2009–2010 financial year are exempted from payment of tuition, examination, sports/gym, library, study tour/rural camp. However, they will be required to pay other fees including the annual premium of Group Mediclaim Policy. They also need to apply for the Freeship to the Maharashtra State Government through the Institute. For more details, they may meet the Liaison Officer or Section Officer of the SC/ST Cell, TISS. 2.9.

AFTER SELECTION FORMALITIES

Details will be notified on the TISS website at the time of declaration of results.

3 Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013: Programme-specific Details 3.1.

INTAKE OF STUDENTS FOR THE ACADEMIC YEAR 2011–2012 Sl. No. Programme of Study

Total

1.

Social Work

166

2.

Social Work in Disability Studies and Action

23

3.

Globalisation and Labour

15

4.

Human Resources Management and Labour Relations

60

5.

Social Entrepreneurship

29

6.

Health Administration

34

7.

Hospital Administration

46

8.

Public Health in Health Policy, Economics and Finance

15

9.

Public Health in Social Epidemiology

23

10.

Counselling

23

11.

Development Studies

46

12.

Education (Elementary)

39

13.

Women’s Studies

17

14.

Habitat Policy and Practice

15

15.

Disaster Management

37

16.

Media and Cultural Studies

23

17.

Social Work in Rural Development

30

Notes: 1. Reservation for Scheduled Caste, Scheduled Tribe, Other Backward Class and Persons With Disability candidates will be as per the Government of India (GoI) directives. 2. Reservation for PWD and Kashmiri Migrants will be subject to GoI directives, as super-numery basis.

3.2

FOUNDATION COURSES

All students of the Master’s Degree Programmes, except M.A. Education (Elementary), are required to take a set of 5 Foundation Courses (FCs), 3 of which are common. These courses will provide students with an orientation to basic perspectives, issues and themes in society, politics, economy and culture.

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Information Brochure: Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013

SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK 3.3

M.A. SOCIAL WORK

The TISS has been a pioneer in social work education and practice and has, over the years, responded to the needs of the poor, the marginalised and the disadvantaged in society. The social work curriculum has been dynamic and has kept up with the emerging concerns in the era of globalisation. The M.A. Social Work programme is designed to equip students with sound theoretical knowledge about social work, social welfare and development concerns of the poor, and help the students to develop skills and insights of working with people at the individual, group and community levels, and their representatives; and network with other groups and professionals working on similar issues. The programme consists of classroom work, which includes lectures, discussions, student presentations, seminar discussions with subject matter specialists, observation and study of social and related organisations, etc. Supervised concurrent and block field work provides opportunities to develop practical skills in social work. Students are given exposure to work with all sectors of populations such as children, youth, women, elderly, dalits, and people with disabilities. Thus, on completion of the two-year programme, the M.A. Social Work graduate is armed with a range of competencies to work in the field of social work, social welfare and social development. The nature of work covers a continuum of interventions from service delivery to organising people for change to programme development and influencing policy. The M.A. Social Work programme offers its students a wide range of work opportunities in non-government, inter-government and government organisations working at the micro and macro levels simultaneously at the local, national and international levels. The programme equips its students to work in a wide range of capacities as social workers, counsellors, field officers, project officers and programme coordinators in the fields of health, education, development, criminal and juvenile justice, gender issues, family services such as family courts, family counselling centres, adoption centres, broad-based child welfare services, community organisation and development practice, NGO–corporate initiatives, industry, funding agencies, research-based organisations, advocacy and human rights organisations and organisations working in specialised areas of disability, HIV/AIDS, sexuality, disasters, etc. Employment opportunities are also available in academic and research organisations as instructors, lecturers in colleges/ departments of social work, as researchers and as community development personnel, in funding agencies and as development consultants. Distribution of Credit Hours Semester Courses Foundation Courses (4 Courses) Social Work Practice – I (2 Courses) I Core Social Work Courses (2 Courses) Field Work

Credits 8 4 4 6

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Information Brochure: Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013 Semester Courses Foundation Course (2 Courses) Social Work Practice – I (3 Courses) II Core Social Work Courses (3 Courses) Field Work Total of First Year III

IV

Students will opt for any One Field of Practice Concentration (7 Courses) Social Work Practice – II (1 Course) Field Work Students will opt for One Concentration (4 Courses) OR Four Optional Courses (2 Credits, each) OR Research Project (6 Credits) + Workshop on Analysis in Quantitative and Qualitative Research (2 Credits) Field Work

Credits 4 6 6 6 44 14 2 6

8

6

Total of Second Year

36

GRAND TOTAL

80

Semester-wise Listing of Courses Semester Course No. Title of the Courses FC 1 Understanding Society FC 2 Introduction to Economics FC 3 Development Experience, State, Social Conflict and Change FC 4 Polity, Governance and Public Policy SW 1 Social Work Practice – I I SW 1.1 Group Work SW 1.2 Case Work SW 2 History and Ideology of Social Work SW 4 Quantitative Research Methods in Social Work Field Work FC 5 Law and Social Work FC 6 Human Growth and Behaviour SW 1 Social Work Practice – I SW 1.3 Community Organisation SW 1.4 Social Work Administration II SW 1.5 Social Work Perspectives SW 3 Critical Perspectives on Society: Introduction to Social Theory SW 5 Qualitative Research Methods in Social Work SW 6 Participatory Communication Field Work

Credits 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 6 4 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 6

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Information Brochure: Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013

Semester Course No. Title of the Courses SW 7 Social Work Practice – II: Social Action, Networking and Advocacy Field of Practice Concentration (Any One Concentration) C 1.1 Community Organisation and Development Practice C 1.2 Persons with Disability and Equalisation of Opportunities C 1.3 Health and Development III C 1.4 Dalits and Tribals: Social Justice, Equity and Governance C 1.5 Criminology and Justice C 1.6 Social Work with Children and Families C 1.7 Women-Centred Social Work Field Work

Credits 2

14

6

Any One Concentration C 2.1 C 2.2 C 2.3 C 2.4 C 2.5 C 2.6 C 2.7 C 2.8 C 2.9 C 2.10 C 2.11 C 2.12 IV

Rural Development, Environment and Sustainable Livelihoods Urban Development: Unorganised Sector and Livelihoods Social Work in the Field of Mental Health Social Policy and Planning Community Health Disasters, Impoverishment and Social Vulnerability Juvenile Justice and Youth in Conflict Developmental/Therapeutic Counselling Socio-Legal Rehabilitation Practice Advanced Practice with Children and Families Youth and Change Conflicts, Peace and Human Security OR Optional Courses (Any Four Courses) OC 3.1 Governance of Non-Profit Organisations OC 3.2 Organisational Behaviour in Non-Profit Organisations OC 3.3 Strategic Management for Non-Profit Organisations OC 3.4 Financial Management in Non-Profit Organisations OC 3.5 Project Management OC 3.6 Training for Social Work Personnel OC 3.7 Non-Formal Education OC 3.8 International Social Work OC 3.9 Spirituality and Social Work C 2.3.3 Child and Adolescent Mental Health C 2.5.1 Community Health Planning and Management C 2.5.3 Gender, Health and Rights C 2.7.2 Juvenile Justice System

8

2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

21

Information Brochure: Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013 Semester Course No. Title of the Courses C 2.8.3 Therapeutic Counselling Interventions DS 16 Social Exclusion and Social Justice OR IV Research Project (6 credits) and Analysis in Qualitative and Quantitative Research (Workshop for Research Project Students) (2 credits) AND Field Work

Credits 2 2

8

6

Note: The semester-wise listing of courses is provisional, and may undergo some changes.

Course Outline The Foundation Courses, Core Social Work Courses and Social Work Practice Courses are compulsory for all Social Work students. In Semester III, students are required to opt for any one field of Practice Concentration. In Semester IV, students will have to choose any ONE of the following: (i) a Research Project, (ii) one Knowledge-based Interventions/ Skills Concentration, and (iii) four Optional Courses. 3.4 M.A. SOCIAL WORK IN DISABILITY STUDIES AND ACTION The TISS has been a pioneer in social work education and practice and has, over the years, responded to the needs of the poor, the marginalised and the disadvantaged in society. One of the largest minority groups in India—who have suffered long years of neglect, deprivation, segregation and exclusion—are persons with disability. Though trained social workers have been working with people with disability in a wide variety of settings, the disability rehabilitation field has voiced a strong need for the social work profession to create a cadre of professional social workers, with competency in empowering people with disability and all stakeholders. An M.A. Social Work in Disability Studies and Action programme is the first of its kind in the country. This M.A. programme is designed to equip students with sound theoretical knowledge about issues and concerns of persons with disability and all stakeholders, and to help students to develop skills and insights into working with, through and for people with disability at the individual, group and community levels and their representatives, stakeholders and network with other groups and professionals working on similar issues. The programme consists of classroom work, which includes lectures, discussions, student presentations, and seminar discussions with experts on disability issues; observation study of disability and related organisations and related activities. Field work and rural practicum under supervision provides opportunities to develop practical skills in disability rehabilitation social work. All students of the programme are expected to conduct a research project as a compulsory part requirement for the M.A. degree. A workshop on qualitative and quantitative research is offered to the students in the third semester to further strengthen their research capacity. Field work is concurrent for both the years. The three week rural practicum is a graded activity carrying one credit as community-based rehabilitation, especially in rural India, is an important rehabilitation programme.

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Information Brochure: Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013

Thus, at the end of the two years, the M.A. Disability Studies and Action graduate is equipped with a range of competencies to work with all groups of persons with disability and other stakeholders in social work and allied fields, at the practice, training, policy and advocacy levels. The M.A. Social Work in Disability Studies and Action will offer its graduates a wide range of field work opportunities in non-governmental, inter-governmental and governmental organisations working at the micro and macro levels simultaneously at the local, regional, national and international levels. The M.A. Social Work in Disability Studies and Action is recognised by the Rehabilitation Council of India. The programme equips its graduates to work in a wide range of settings, such as, hospitals, clinics, early detection and intervention centres, special and integrated school settings, vocational rehabilitation centres, community based rehabilitation programmes, parents' associations and associations of persons with disability and other rehabilitation settings. Distribution of Credits Year

Detail

First

Credits

Courses

23

Field Work

12

Courses

20

Field Work

12

Second Rural Practicum

1

Research Project

6

Workshop related to research project

2

TOTAL

76

Semester-wise Listing of Courses Semester Course No. FC 1 FC 2 FC 3 I SWP 1 SWP 3

II

FC 6 SWP 2 SWP 4 SWP 5 BC 2 DSA 1.1

Title of the Courses Understanding Society Introduction to Economics Development Experience, State, Social Conflict and Change Theoretical Perspectives and their Application to Disability Rehabilitation Social Work Process of Social Work Practice in Disability Rehabilitation (across semesters I and II) Human Growth and Behaviour Sanctions, Values and Ethics of Social Work Agency Administration Team Work in Disability Rehabilitation Social Work Qualitative Research Persons with Disability and their Rehabilitation Contexts

Credits 2 2 2 3 4 2 1 1 2 2 2

23

Information Brochure: Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013 Semester Course No. DSA 1.2 DSA 2 DSA 3 III DSA 4

IV

DSA 5 DSA 6 DSA 7 DSA 8

Title of the Courses Persons with Disability and their Rehabilitation Contexts Human Rights, Social Policies and Law Rehabilitation and Counselling Interventions Family Centred Interventions with Families of Children and Adults with Disabilities Workshop on Analysis in Quantitative and Qualitative Research The Gender Dimensions of Disability in the Indian Context Management of Rehabilitation Programmes for the Disabled Building Disability Awareness through Action Seminar on Issues related to Field Practice

Field Work (2 years) Rural Practicum Research Project

Credits 2 2 4 2 2 2 2 2 2 24 1 6

The research project is a compulsory part requirement for the degree and carries 6 credits.

SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT AND LABOUR STUDIES 3.5

M.A. GLOBALISATION AND LABOUR

The onslaught of globalisation and liberalisation has been causing major changes in the lives of the people in developing countries in general and the working class in particular. This has happened particularly during a short span of just two decades. It is during this period that the world witnessed an intensification of the globalisation process and liberal policies. Moves to counter these forces are present but at times are weak and mostly divided. The ILO has stated specifically that there should be measures that make globalisation more inclusive of the marginalised. There is a need to introduce this debate at a level that is higher than mere rhetoric and sloganeering. It is necessary to equip people engaged in mass-based organisations such as trade unions, cooperatives and other membership-based organisations with adequate knowledge at the theoretical, conceptual and empirical levels so that they can interrogate these processes and take stands that are realistic. It needs to be stated clearly that the M.A. Globalisation and Labour is not a management course. On the contrary, it is geared towards the needs of those working in membership-based organisations. These include trade unions, organisations such as co-operatives, self-help groups, etc. Bright young graduates or post-graduates who do not fall in the above categories but are interested in working in such organisations or would be engaged in labour research are also included. The programme provides a framework to understand the diversity of experiences of globalisation and its impact on work and labour. There will be an emphasis on comprehending the implications of globalisation and labour on economically and socially marginalised sections and bring out the complexities of the

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Information Brochure: Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013

same in forms of mobilisation, protest and resistance. The course content will provide both theoretical analysis as well as empirical studies. The pedagogy for the programme will be through classroom teaching, tutorials, student seminars, project work and field visits. The role of visiting faculty, mainly from trade unions and labour research organisations from different countries, will be a vital input in the pedagogy. Classroom teaching will comprise 50% of the credit hours. Students will be encouraged to make presentations on the different topics covered, based on field visits and their own experiences. For the Trade Union Sponsored Students, classroom teaching will be completed in the first year of the programme. A total of 16 courses (including three common Foundation Courses), comprising 48 credits will be taught in this year. All these students will undergo an internship of six months, which will be equivalent to 16 credits. They will also write a dissertation on a research topic, which will be equivalent to 8 credits. Regular Students will have classroom teaching along with the trade union sponsored students in the first year. In the third semester, they will undergo an internship of 3.5 months (equivalent to 8 credits) in a trade union, membership-based organisation, or any organisation connected with CSR activities. All these students will return for one more semester of classroom teaching, in the fourth semester. Four courses will be taught during this semester. These students will write their dissertation, which is equivalent to 8 credits. Distribution of Credit Hours Year

Detail

Courses Internship Second Dissertation Courses TOTAL First

Credits Trade Union Students Regular Students 48 48 8 16 8 8 8 0 72 72

Semester-wise Listing of Courses Semester Course No FC 1 FC 2 FC 3 GL 4 I GL 8 GL 10 GL 14 GL 15 GL 1 II GL 2 GL 3

Course Title Understanding Society Basic Economics Development Experience, State, Social Conflict and Change One World Seminar Globalisation and Informal Employment Social Protection and the State Labour and Formal Organisation Elements of Macro-Economics Foundation Course in Globalisation and Labour (School Based) Labour Markets in Developing Countries International Labour Standards, Decent Work and Social Dialogue

Credits 2 2 2 2 4 4 2 4 2 4 4

25

Information Brochure: Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013 Semester Course No Course Title Industrial Relations and Trade Unions Strategies in a Global GL 7 Economy GL 9 Organising Informal Labour II GL 11 Research Methodology GL 12 Leadership Development (Compulsory, Non–Credit) World Trade Organisation, World Bank and the International GL 13 Monetary Fund Trade Union Students (6 months) III Internship Regular Students (3.5 months) Trade Union Students Dissertation Regular Students GL 16 Indian Labour Law IV GL 17 Corporate Social Responsibility and Social Audit GL 18 Governance and Public Policy GL 19 Advanced Writing Skills

Credits 4 4 4 4 16 8 16 8 2 2 2 2

Note: GL 16, GL 17, GL 18 and GL 19 are only for the regular students

3.6

M.A. HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT AND LABOUR RELATIONS

The M.A. Human Resources Management and Labour Relations programme (HRM & LR) (and formerly known as M.A. Personnel Management and Industrial Relations) is designed to develop students into professionally competent and socially sensitive management graduates, fully equipped to take on the challenges of the corporate world. This programme presents an outstanding prospect to explore the critical areas of contemporary human resources management, in concert with a comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the key functions of management and business. The broad objectives of this programme are to sensitise students to the social, political, economic, and ecological environments of the society; to enable students to become effective business leaders and decision-makers to contribute to organisational effectiveness; to facilitate the use of systems thinking among the students to evolve possibilities, while addressing various personal and organisational challenges; to develop a global perspective among students to respond to global challenges; and to impart values of intellectual honesty, justice and fairness. Responding to the changes in the external environment, a futuristic orientation and in consonance with the mission of the Institute, this M.A. HRM & LR has undergone a major restructuring of its curriculum. The programme places importance on both theoretical and hands-on learning. While classroom learning through participation in discussions, case study analysis, presentations, simulation games, assignments, etc., emphasises conceptual clarity, practical inputs are provided through the rigorous field work system, which complements the classroom inputs by throwing light on the practical dimension of the profession. The insights that emerge out of such an experience make students conceptually strong and successful in the practice of the profession. Field work is a continuous process, which seeks to facilitate student’s

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Information Brochure: Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013

exposure to varied industry sectors. Students also undertake internships with organisations for a period ranging from 6–8 weeks, which is seen as an opportunity for the student to learn significantly from, and contribute meaningfully to organisations. In brief, the M.A. HRM & LR programme, which benefits from over 4 decades of teaching and research in the same area, is a challenging teaching–learning experience that blends cutting edge theory with innovative practice to develop business leaders for the global industry. The TISS HRM & LR postgraduates are amongst the most sought after in global industry today. They occupy positions of leadership across a wide spectrum of industries and sectors including, IT/ITeS, banking and finance, telecom, manufacturing, public sector, pharmaceutical, retail and management consultancy. Distribution of Credit Hours Year First

Second

Detail

Credit s

Courses (Compulsory)

32

Field Work

12

Courses (Compulsory)

16 12

Field Work Optional Courses (spanning across both First and Second years) Research Project

10 6

TOTAL

88

Notes:· • Research project is compulsory and equivalent to 6 credit hours (i.e., 3 courses). · • Students can opt for any 5 optional courses from the basket of 10 courses, distributed across 4 semesters. • The credits are only indicative and may change.

Semester-Wise Listing of Courses Semester Course No. Title of the Courses

I

Credits

PC 1

Interaction with HR Heads (Part of Induction)

-

PC 2

Round Table Discussion on FW followed by Industrial visits (Part of Field Work)

-

FC 1

Understanding Society

2

FC 2

Introduction to Basic Economics

2

FC 3

Development Experience, State, Social Conflict and Change

2

FC HR 1

Sociology of Organisation, Organisation Theory and Design

2

FC HR 2

Management of Human Resources: Conceptual and Strategic Perspectives

2

FC HR 3

Industrial Relations and Trade Unionism

2

HR 1

Social Research & Case Analysis

2

HR 2

Employment Law – I

2

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Information Brochure: Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013 Semester Course No. Title of the Courses HR 3* I

II

III

IV

Business Environment

2

HR 4*

Business Communication and Presentation Skills

2

PC 3

Understanding Self and Facilitating Relationship (in the form of personal growth laboratory) (Compulsory and non-evaluative)

-

HR 5

Organisation Behaviour –I

2

HR 6

Performance Management and Development

2

HR 7

Learning and Development

2

HR 8

Business Statistics and Quantitative Techniques

2

HR 9

Compensation Management

2

HR 10

Employee Resourcing

2

HR 11

Marketing and Sales Management

2

HR 12

Operations Management

2

PC 4

Development Centre (Compulsory and non-evaluative)

-

HR 13

Organisation Development and Change Management

2

HR 14

Application of IT in HRM

2

HR 15

Employment Law – II

2

HR 16

Labour Economics: Theory and Practice

2

HR 17

Employee Wellness, Decent Work and SHE

2

HR 18

Organisation Behaviour – II

2

HR 19

Financial Accounting & Cost Management

2

HR 20*

Conflict Management and Negotiation Skills

2

HR 21*

Training Process, Delivery and Effectiveness Measurement

2

HR 22*

Advanced Compensation and Benefit

2

PC 5

Assessment Centre: Conceptualisation and Implementation (Compulsory and non-evaluative)

-

HR 23

Corporate Governance and Business Ethics

2

HR 24*

Business Strategy and Strategic Human Resources Management

2

HR 25*

Human Resource Management in International Settings

2

HR 26*

Gender and Diversity Management

2

HR 27*

Talent Management

2

HR 28*

Leadership

2

(PC: Professional Context; FC: Foundation Course; * Optional Courses) Notes: • • • • •

Credits

Total credit hours for the programme, including field work, are 88. PC 1 and PC 2 form part of Induction to the programme. Compulsory courses comprise 48 credit hours. Summer project is non-credit and compulsory. The semester-wise listing of courses is provisional and may change.

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Information Brochure: Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013

3.7

M.A. SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP

The field of Social Entrepreneurship leverages business management and entrepreneurial skills to pursue the multiple bottom-line of the social enterprise by keeping the stakeholder value intact rather than only that of shareholder value. The two-year, full time, M.A. Social Entrepreneurship (MASE) aims at training and developing change leaders for social and environment related problem solving in collaboration with state, market and civil society institutions. The course curriculum blends cutting edge theory with field based experiential learnings to develop appropriate, efficient, effective and economically sustainable entrepreneurial activities. The contents of the course cover an overview of economics and sociology, innovative problem solving, venture creation, business and organisational management and leadership linking with benefits to stakeholders. A distinctive feature of the course curriculum is inductive pedagogy blending classroom teaching and experiential learning through field work; problem solving assignments on social problems at individual and group levels; and meeting and interaction with social and business entrepreneurs. The MASE programme is primarily targeted toward developing entrepreneurial skills. There are 3 major dimensions and components of the MASE programme: (a) Social Context, (b) Entrepreneurship skills, and (c) Management Tools. A designed mix of all the three will be created in each Semester to meet the overall objectives of the programme. As discussed, the entrepreneurial domain is predominantly based on ‘effectual’ logic, while managerial domain is ‘causal’. The MASE programme, explained later in this document, clearly depicts major focus on ‘effectual logic’ during the initial period, gradually exposing the students to ‘causal logic’ at a later stage. Students will be allowed to understand and experience both and take a creative decision to decide to adopt one or mix of both. It is also important to note that since ‘Entrepreneurial Skills’ and ‘Management Tools’ contradict each other, most of the times, the contradictions are made clear to the students at every stage. Students are allowed to make a choice about their preferences, through the creative process of learning. The programme design follows the ‘life cycle approach’ of entrepreneurial process, i.e., creative phase, venture creation phase and growth phase. It is recommended that students should be called for a one-week refresher programme one year after they complete MASE programme and gain substantial experience in social venture management. They should be encouraged to share their experiences with the junior students, too. The proposed approach will be as follows: Course Focus Semester

Social Context Focus High

I

• Understanding society and social dimensions

Entrepreneurial Skill Focus Management Tools Focus High Low · Social entrepreneurship as innovative approach to social problem solving

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Information Brochure: Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013 Semester II

Social Context Focus Moderate · Framework of social problem study Moderate

III

High IV

Entrepreneurial Skill Focus High

Management Tools Focus Moderate · Social enture management tool kit High

High · Framework for innovative problem solving · Social venture planning High High · Social venture · Social venture growth management, operational planning and management problem solving

Distribution of Credit Hours Year

Detail Courses First Field Work/Internship Courses Second Field Work/Internship Research Paper (Dissertation) TOTAL

Credits 24 24 19 6 4 77

Semester-wise Listing of Courses Semester Course No. Course Title Credits FC 1 Understanding Society 2 FC 2 Introduction to Basic Economics 2 FC 3 Development Experience, State, Social Conflict and Change 2 SE 1 Entrepreneurship 1 SE 2 Social Entrepreneurship 1 I SE 3 Venture Plan I 1 SE 4 Basic Accounting 1 SE 5 Quantitative research methods and Computer Aided Applied Statistics 2 Field Work (1 Month) 6 SE 6 Social Sector: Perspectives and Interventions 2 SE 7 Venture Plan II 2 SE 8 Qualitative Research Methodology 1 SE 9 Marketing for Social Ventures and Marketing Research 2 II SE 10 Social Network Analysis 2 SE 11 Financial Management 1 SE 12 Project Management 2 Internship (3 Months) 18

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Information Brochure: Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013

Semester Course No. Course Title SE 13 Evidence based Intervention Advocacy and Policy Making SE 14 Legal Framework for the Social Enterprises SE 15 Fund Raising SE 16 Social Marketing III SE 17 Social Enterprise Management Research Project Phase I(Compulsory, Non-credited Course) Data Collection (compulsory, Non-credited Course) Field Work (1 Month) SE 18 Social Impact Assessment and Policy Evaluation SE 19 Business Ethics SE 20 Risk Management SE 21 Corporate Social Responsibility SE 22 Entrepreneurial Leadership and Motivation IV SE 23 Venture Plan III SE 24 Microfinance SE 25 Performance Management SE 26 Strategic Management (Compulsory, Non-credited Course) Research Project (Dissertation)

Credits 2 1 2 2 1 6 2 1 1 1 1 2 2 1 4

SCHOOL OF HEALTH SYSTEMS STUDIES 3.8

MASTER OF HEALTH ADMINISTRATION

TISS pioneered health and hospital administration programmes in the country and continue to remain as an innovator in curriculum and delivery. The Master of Health Administration programme aims to develop a cadre of professional managers in the health sector. The M.H.A. (Health) Degree is awarded after completing the requirements of all 4 semesters, which may be done over a maximum period of 5 years from the date of registration, failing which the student will be disqualified from receiving the Master’s Degree. This programme includes taught courses, internships and a research project. The Master of Health Administration programme prepares students to take on managerial positions in the national health programmes, the NGO sector and community-based health programmes by building capacities in planning, implementing, monitoring and evaluating those programmes. It also orients the students to macro issues relevant to health policy and programming in the country. Students of this programme are offered managerial positions in national and international health care organisations and projects. Their job description includes designing, planning, implementing, monitoring and evaluation of health care programmes and projects, especially in the community. In the past, students have been employed by key national organisations like the National AIDS Control Organisation, State Health Systems

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Information Brochure: Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013

Resource Centres of the Ministry of Health and major voluntary organisations such as CARE-India, Catholic Relief Service, and Aga Khan Health Services, India. Some are also absorbed in UN organisations such as UNFPA, and international health projects supported by organisations like the World Bank, WHO and DFID. In recent years, they are also finding positions in the IT and the health insurance sectors. Distribution of Credit Hours Institution-based Foundation Courses

4

School-based Foundation Courses

11

Basic Courses

18

Health Administration Courses

18

Internships

20

Research Project

6

Total

77

Semester-wise Listing of Courses Semester Course No. Title of the Courses FC 1 Understanding Society FC 3 Development Experience, State, Social and Conflict and Change SFC 1 Social Science Perspectives on Health SFC 2 Basic Economics and Health Economics SFC 3 Research Methodology – I (Quantitative Methods) I SFC 4 Research Methodology – II (Qualitative Methods) SFC 5 Introduction to Epidemiology and Biostatistics MBC 1 Principles of Health Services Management MBC 2 Evolution of Health Services MBC 3 Organisational Behaviour MBC 4 Financial Accounting MBC 5 Human Resources Management and Labour Legislation MBC 6 Material Management HE 1 Community Health II HE 2 Management of National Health Programmes HE 8 Financing of Health Services HE 9 Comparative Health Systems and Policies First Internship (8 weeks) MBC 7 Operations Research III

Credits 2 2 2 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 8 2

MBC 8

Health Insurance

2

MBC 9

Strategic Management in Health Care Settings

2

HE 3

Health Planning

2

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Information Brochure: Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013

Semester Course No. Title of the Courses HE 6 Gender, Health and Human Rights III

IV

HE 5

Credits 2

Health Education and Communication

2

Second Internship (8 weeks)

8

HE 4

Health Management Information Systems

2

HE 7

Urban Health

2

Third Internship (4 weeks)

4

Research Project

6

Note: The semester-wise listing of courses is provisional, and may undergo some changes.

3.9

MASTER OF HOSPITAL ADMINISTRATION

The Master of Hospital Administration programme aims to develop a cadre of professional managers in hospital sector. The M.H.A. (Hospital) Degree is awarded after completing the requirements of all 4 semesters, which may be done over a maximum period of 5 years from the date of registration, failing which the student will be disqualified from receiving the Master’s Degree. This programme includes taught courses, internships and a research project. The Master of Hospital Administration programme prepares students for leadership roles in the hospital sector through training in planning, operational and project management of hospitals including orientation in the managerial aspects of clinical and support services departments. The programme also imparts training in managing financial, material and human resources as well as planning and managing information systems in hospital settings. Students of the Master of Hospital Administration programme find jobs to manage a variety of specialised services in hospitals — both in the private and government sectors. Their job description includes managing various departments of large hospitals as well as planning and designing new services and new hospitals. In the past, students have found employment in leading corporate- and trust-run hospitals all over the country. Of late, there are also job opportunities arising in hospital consultancy firms, IT industry, and health insurance sector. Distribution of Credit Hours Institution-based Foundation courses

4

School-based Foundation courses

11

Basic Courses:

18

Hospital Administration Courses

26

Internships

20

Project Work

4

Total

83

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Information Brochure: Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013

Semester-wise Listing of Courses Semester Course Title

I

II

III

IV

Credits

FC 1

Understanding Society

2

FC 3

Development Experience, State, Social Conflict and Change

2

SFC 1

Social Science Perspectives on Health

2

SFC 2

Basic Economics and Health Economics

3

SFC 3

Research Methodology – I (Quantitative Methods)

2

SFC 4

Research Methodology – II (Qualitative Methods)

2

SFC 5

Introduction to Epidemiology and Biostatistics

2

MBC 1

Principles of Health Services Management

2

MBC 2

Evolution of Health Services

2

MBC 3

Organisational Behaviour

2

MBC 4

Financial Accounting

2

MBC 5

Human Resources Management and Labour Legislation

2

MBC 6

Materials Management

2

HO 1

Management Accounting

2

HO 2

Organisation and Administration of Supportive Services

2

HO 3

Organisation and Administration of Clinical and Super Specialty Services

3

HO 4

Hospital Planning

2

First Internship (8 weeks)

8

MBC 7

Operation Research

2

MBC 8

Health Insurance

2

MBC 9

Strategic Management in Health Care Settings

2

HO 5

Legal Framework for Hospitals

2

HO 6

Systems Development and Information Resource Management in Hospitals

3

HO 7

Management of Medical Staff, Clinical Services and Medical Committees

2

Second Internship (8 weeks)

8

HO 8

Medical Technology Management

2

HO 9

Quality Management

2

HO 10

Marketing Management

2

HO 11

Financial Management

2

HO 12

Business Development Strategies

2

Internship (4 weeks)

4

Project Work

4

Note: The semester-wise listing of courses is provisional, and may undergo some changes.

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Information Brochure: Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013

3.10 MASTER OF PUBLIC HEALTH IN HEALTH POLICY, ECONOMICS AND FINANCE Health care sector is an important part of economy and is the focus of much technological innovation and biomedical research. Health policy which provides direction and shapes the functioning of this sector is a vitally important area of study. Health systems across the South Asian and African regions also confront challenges such as a lack of evidence-based policies, limited social accountability, lack of expertise in ethical review, health economics, financing and health policy. Given this context, the proposed programme is a response to address the limited institutional capacity in India, South Asia and Africa for strengthening training, research, policy and practice in health sector. The Master of Public Health (MPH) in Health Policy, Economics and Finance aims to broaden understanding of policy issues through a multi-disciplinary approach and develop critical analysis of issues within health policy, economics and financing and enable students to devise appropriate health policy responses. It would provide the required skills and perspectives to be nurtured and engage health expertise to collectively undertake analytical work for generating policy recommendations related to public health action. The programme has been designed for middle level and senior professionals working in the health system of India, South Asia, South East Asia and Africa, allied health professionals and other post-graduates. The programme has been created in collaboration with the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE). The programme will have an international focus and teaching would cover literature from across the globe with specific focus on South Asia and Africa. It is a two-semester, in-campus programme followed by field practicum and research project in the second year. The programme will have 25 weeks teaching (in-campus), and 5 weeks internship in their first year. In the second year, the student will carry out research and field practicum in the respective place of work or within the health system. Working professionals can go back to their respective place of work in the second year. Combination of a strong taught component and extensive fieldwork would enable learners develop a sound knowledge-base as well as professional skill enhancement. The degree is awarded after completion of all programme requirements, which is designed to be completed the two years; but has provision to complete over a maximum period of 5 years from the date of registration. This is a unique master’s programme designed to create high quality professionals with expertise in health policy with strong foundation in economics and financial analysis. The graduates will find employment in a range of sectors including health care delivery, financing, consulting and technology in the governmental, pharmaceutical, international NGOs and bilateral and multilateral agencies.

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Information Brochure: Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013

Distribution of Credit Hours Institution-based Foundation courses School-based Foundation courses Basic Courses: MPH-HPEF Courses Internship Field Practicum Research Project Total

4 11 11 16 5 10 10 67

Semester-wise Listing of Courses Semester Course No. Title of the Courses

I

II

Credits

FC 1

Understanding Society

2

FC 3

Development Experience, State, Social Conflict and Change

2

SFC 1

Social Science Perspectives on Health

2

SFC 2

Basic Economics and Health Economics

3

SFC 3

Research Methodology – I (Quantitative Methods)

2

SFC 4

Research Methodology – II (Qualitative Methods)

2

SFC 5

Introduction to Epidemiology and Biostatistics

2

PBC 1

Health Care Management

2

PHP 1

Foundations of Health Policy and Planning

2

PHP 2

Introduction to Health and Health Systems

2

PHP 3

Foundations of Social Care Policy

2

PHP*

Health Care Standards and Measures of Performance

Nil

PBC 2

Ethics, Legislation and Governance in Public Health

3

PBC 3

Financing Health Care

2

PBC 4

Health Policy and Systems Research

2

PBC 5

Health and Population in Developing and Transitional Societies

2

PHP 4

Comparative Health Systems and Policies

2

PHP 5

Health Insurance

2

PHP 6

Economic Evaluation in Health Care

2

PHP 7

Pharmaceutical Economics and Policy

2

PHP 8

Current Issues in Health Policies

2

Internship (5 weeks)

5

III

Field Practicum

10

IV

Research Project

10

Note: The semester-wise listing of courses is provisional, and may undergo some changes.

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Information Brochure: Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013

3.11 MASTER OF PUBLIC HEALTH IN SOCIAL EPIDEMIOLOGY The Master of Public Health in Social Epidemiology programme aims to train students for a career in public health. The MPH Degree is designed to be completed in two years (4 semesters), but has provision to complete over a maximum period of 5 years from the date of registration. The programme includes taught courses, internships and a research project. This MPH programme has a focus on Social Epidemiology and is designed to orient the students towards the conceptual understanding of public health issues and impart research skills required for developing much needed evidence based planning at the population level. Thus, the students will be capable of undertaking meaningful research for supporting public health policy and planning for the effective implementation of public health programmes. The students can occupy technical and leadership positions in public health programmes after passing out. The graduates of the School of Health Systems Studies have been employed by key national organisations like the National AIDS Control Organisation, State Health Systems Resource Centres of the Ministry of Health and major voluntary organisations such as CARE-India, Catholic Relief Service, and Aga Khan Health Services, India. Some are also absorbed in UN organisations such as UNFPA, and international health projects supported by organisations like the World Bank, WHO and DFID. In recent years, they have also found positions in the IT and the health insurance sectors. Distribution of Credit Hours Institution-based Foundation courses

4

School-based Foundation courses

11

Basic Courses:

11

MPH-SE Courses

24

Internships

16

Dissertation

8

Total

74

Semester-wise Listing of Courses Semester Course No. Title of the Courses

I

Credits

FC 1

Understanding Society

2

FC 3

Development Experience, State, Social Conflict and Change

2

SFC 1

Social Science Perspectives on Health

2

SFC 2

Basic Economics and Health Economics

3

SFC 3

Research Methodology – I (Quantitative Methods)

2

SFC 4

Research Methodology – II (Qualitative Methods)

2

37

Information Brochure: Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013 Semester Course No. Title of the Courses

I

II

III

IV

Credits

SFC 5

Introduction to Epidemiology and Biostatistics

2

PBC 1

Health Care Management

2

PHE 1

Introduction to Public Health

2

PHE 2

Epidemiology of Communicable and Non-Communicable Diseases – I

2

PHE 4

Social and Behavioural Influences on Health

2

PBC 2

Ethics, Legislation and Governance in Public Health

3

PBC 3

Financing Health Care

2

PBC 4

Health Policy and Systems Research

2

PBC 5

Health and Population in Developing and Transitional Societies

2

PHE 3

Epidemiology of Communicable and Non-Communicable Disease – II

2

First Internship

8

PHE 5

Advanced Epidemiology

2

PHE 6

Advanced Biostatistics

2

PHE 7

RCH and Adolescents

2

PHE 8

Evaluation Research in Public Health

1

PHE 9

International Public Health

2

PHE 10

Public Health Surveillance and Information Systems

2

Second Internship

8

PHE 11

Health Education and Communication

2

PHE 12

Environmental Health

1

PHE 13

Mental Health

1

PHE 14

Public Health Nutrition

1

Dissertation

8

Note: The semester-wise listing of courses is provisional, and may undergo some changes.

SCHOOL OF SOCIAL SCIENCES 3.12 M.A. COUNSELLING The M.A. Counselling programme is anchored by the School of Social Sciences, and conducted in collaboration with the School of Social Work and the Centre for Lifelong Learning. Periods of abrupt change require individuals and groups to adapt to new situations. The process of economics, social, environmental and political changes at the household, community and national levels has been a challenge to individuals and families. And the forces beyond the control of individuals, households and communities are adding complications impacting lives of people in Economic, Social, Cultural and Psychological spheres, in rural and urban areas. People experiencing economic and social disadvantages,

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Information Brochure: Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013

subjected to gender discrimination at public and private spheres of life, differentially abled, and those living with HIV/AIDS and other life threatening health problems face stigma and difficulties in adjustment. People in certain professions are also encountering tremendous strain in fulfilling their duties, like the police force. Growing up in different socio-cultural and economic contexts by itself has an element of adjustment. Adaptation and adjustment is, therefore, likely to require professional assistance and counselling is one of them. The primary focus of the M.A. Counselling programme is to impart professional education in the developmental and contextual approach to counselling. In addition, it will impart skills to work with individuals encountering difficulties in coping with different situations and experiences. The core courses include Psychology and Human Development, knowledge to assess counselling situations, the problems and skills practice. This is strengthened by courses providing analytical frameworks to comprehend the larger social-cultural reality as well as a grasp of the contextual premise in which counselling will have to occur. The practice of skills will take place under both close supervision by trained professionals and also more independently in practice settings. The theory and practice are important part of the curriculum. Research supports practice and practice needs to be documented and disseminated. Research is spread over two years and amounts 8 Credits. The field of counselling is applicable in a wide range of groups and settings: parent and child counselling; counselling of armed forces; settings like the school, hospitals, industries and work places; NGOs that work with various human relationship related problems; for issues involving trauma or intense difficulties in dealing with self or others, like violence situations, marital and family problems, disaster situations, etc. Counselling is emerging as an important area, and professional counsellors are required in various settings. The candidates after completion of this degree programme can expect to be working in such settings and contribute to building a body of knowledge in the field. Distribution of Credit Hours Year

Detail Foundation Courses Counselling Courses First Practice Research Counselling Courses Second Optional Course and Practice Research TOTAL

Credits 6 22 8 2 10 18 8 74

Semester-wise Listing of Courses Semester Course No. FC 1 I FC 2 FC 3

Title of the Courses Understanding Society Introduction to Basic Economics Development Experience, State, Social Conflict and Change

Credits 2 2 2

39

Information Brochure: Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013 Semester Course No. CN 1 CN 2 CN 3 CN 4 I CN 5

II

III

IV

Title of the Courses Credits Introduction to Counselling 2 Personal and Interpersonal Development of the Counsellor – I 2 Human Growth and Development I: Child and Adolescent Development 2 Theories for Counselling 2 Research Methods – I 2

CN 6

Introduction to Social Psychology

2

CN 7

Ethics in Counselling

1

CN 8

Practicum – I

2

CN 9

Counselling Assessment – I

2

CN 10

Understanding Psychological Problems

2

CN 11

Personal and Interpersonal Development of the Counsellor – II

1

CN 12

Human Growth and Development – II: Adulthood and Ageing

2

CN 13

Theoretical Approaches and Techniques of Counselling

5

CN 14

Socio-cultural Context of Counselling

2

CN 15

Practicum – II

6

CN 16

Research Project – I: Development of Research Proposal



CN 17

Counselling Assessment – II

2

CN 18

Emerging Approaches & Techniques in Counselling

3

CN 19

Research Methods – II: Analysis and Interpretation of Data

2

CN 20

Personal and Interpersonal Development of the Counsellor – III

1

CNO A

Optional Course – I (Theory)*

CNO

Optional Course – I (Practical)

CN 16

Research Project – II: Data Analysis

CNO B

Optional Course – II (Theory)

CNO

Optional Course II (Practical)

CNO 16

Research Project – III

6

CN 21

Personal and Interpersonal Development of the Counsellor – IV

1

CN 22

Internship

2

CN 23

Seminar

2

8 – 8

Note: Optional Courses A and B are offered in Semesters III and IV. Two courses have to be chosen from the following set of Optional Courses. They are: CNO 1: School Counselling CNO 2: Rehabilitation Counselling CNO 3: Marriage and Family Counselling CNO 4: Child, Adolescent and Parent Counselling CNO 5: Counselling Older Persons CNO 6: Psycho-Social Interventions With Children (the course is being developed) n n n n n n

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Information Brochure: Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013

3.13 M.A. DEVELOPMENT STUDIES The two-year (four-semester) M.A. Development Studies Programme combines the perspectives of social science disciplines such as Anthropology, Economics, Geography, History, Political Science and Sociology to understand the social, cultural, economic, and political changes and the major theoretical and policy-related challenges in the process of development and change. The Programme provides a broad understanding and appreciation of the processes involved in formulating development-related policies and implementing development projects. While the Programme’s major focus is on India, many of the issues raised and lessons delivered are essentially global in scope and significance. The Programme offers a number of significant theoretical and applied courses and encourages students to research on contemporary development-related issues and problems. Students in this Programme are helped to acquire the analytical and practical skills they need to engage critically and creatively in development issues and debates from an interdisciplinary perspective, and to work across the intersections of development policy, research and practice. They are taught to develop the ability to work collaboratively with others to identify solutions to both global and local development- related challenges. The other main aim of the Programme is to facilitate the formation of a group of intelligent students who are engaged in the problems confronting weaker sections and in the issues related to social justice. The Programme provides a supportive learning environment that encourages sharing of diverse perspectives, approaches and ideologies in both social research and social practice. The Programme prepares students for professional careers in the area of both governmental and non-governmental organisations. In addition to their regular coursework and research, students in the Development Studies Programme are encouraged to do an internship directly related to their studies. They are also encouraged to organise/participate in regular events such as the Programme-based cultural festival, expert panel discussions on development issues and job placement opportunities. There is a Programme-based placement cell that provides career advising services to students. Students from previous batches have been offered jobs with well-known organisations such as IFMR, Centre for Good Governance, CII, ICICI-SIG, ICR, IFPRI, IMRB, Syntel, TERI, FES, ISB, AC Neilsen, IL&FC and WWF. Curriculum and Assessment The 68-credit M.A. Programme in Development Studies consists of three integral parts — (a) Compulsory Courses (50 Credits), (b) Optional Courses (10 Credits), and (c) Dissertation (8 Credits). The optional courses have been categorised into two groups: Pool 1 and Pool 2. The First and Third Semester students will choose optional courses from Pool 1, and the Second and Fourth Semester students will choose optional courses from Pool 2. Other than optional courses in these two pools, the students may choose not more than two courses (totalling 4 Credits) from other Master's Degree Programmes of the Institute to complete their optional course requirements.

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Information Brochure: Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013

Progress of the students is assessed through various modes of evaluation such as term papers, book-reviews, individual or group presentations, and written examinations. Finally, students submit a dissertation based upon review of literature, secondary data and a short period of field work. Students are encouraged to do internship (optional) as it provides them with hands-on skills and practical experience, and valuable contacts and a competitive edge in the job market. The Centre for Development Studies has a list of organisations for placing the Interns. Distribution of Credit Hours Year

Detail Compulsory Courses (including FCs)

First

Internship

Second

Credits 26 Noncredit

Compulsory Courses

24

Dissertation

8

Optional Courses (across 2 years)

10

TOTAL

68

Semester-wise Listing of Compulsory Courses Semester Course No. FC 1 FC 3 I DS 1 DS 2 DS 3 DS 4 DS 5 II DS 6 DS 7 DS 8 DS 9 DS 10 III DS 11 DS 12 DS 13 DS 14 DS 15 IV DS 16 DS 17 DS 18 Dissertation

Credits Title of the Courses Understanding Society 2 Development Experience, State, Social Conflict and Change 2 Concept, History and Theories of Development 4 Contemporary Indian Economy 2 Methods of Social Research 4 Development Economics 4 State, Democracy and Civil Society 4 Political Economy of Space, Development and Uneven Development 2 Women, History and Social Change 2 Tutorial on Database for Development Research Non-credit Development and the Social Sector 4 Agrarian Relations, Agriculture and Rural Development 2 Social Movements and Social Change 2 Inequality, Poverty and Financing Human Development 2 Law, Institutions, Society and Development 2 Sustainable Development and Climate Change 4 Globalisation, Industrialisation and Labour 2 Social Exclusion and Social Justice: Theories and Process 4 Project Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation 2 Round Table on Development Processes Non-credit 8

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Information Brochure: Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013

Pool-wise List of Optional Courses Pool

I

II

Course No. Title of the Courses (Opt for a Total of 10 Credits)

Credits

DS 01

Principles of Economics: Micro-Economics

2

DS 02

Perspectives in Science, Technology and Society

2

DS 03

Philosophical Foundations to Development Research

2

DS 04

Public Policy: Theories and Processes

2

DS 05

Political Economy of International Trade

2

DS 06

Development and Crime

2

DS 07

Principles of Economics: Macro-Economics

2

DS 08

Advanced Quantitative Research Methods

2

DS 09

Society, Culture and Development

2

DS 10

Urban and Regional Development

2

DS 11

Social Psychology and Development

2

DS 12

Media and Mediated Development

2

DS 13

GIS, Remote Sensing and Development Research

2

3.14 M.A. EDUCATION (ELEMENTARY) The M.A. Education (Elementary) programme aims to enhance knowledge, capacities and orientations that are relevant to strengthening elementary education in the country. Students completing this programme would develop a critical and reflective understanding of core and foundational areas of education, including theory and research, with special reference to India. The programme is designed to include thematic, issue-based courses that are of current significance in the Indian context. Students will also develop special expertise in the chosen areas of study relating more directly to professional needs: for example, curriculum, pedagogy, teacher development, material development, education of children with special needs, leadership and management issues, etc. Supported by the Sir Ratan Tata Trust, Mumbai, and the ICICI Bank, Mumbai, the programme is a collaborative endeavour involving 5 educational organisations, including TISS, that have contributed significantly to elementary education research and innovative practice. The collaborators are: i) Homi Bhabha Centre for Science Education (HBCSE) ii) Vidya Bhawan Society (VBS) iii) Digantar Shiksha Evam Khelkud Samiti iv) Eklavya Career Opportunities In government and non-government institutions, funding agencies, University and college departments of education; as teacher educators in teacher training institutions

Information Brochure: Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013

43

(both pre-service and in-service), curriculum development, material development, in text book writing institutes, education coordination, programme evaluation and research. Dual Mode The M.A. Education (Elementary) programme has 12 courses (10 basic and 2 optional) and one field attachment spread over 4 semesters. The programme is conducted in the dual mode — viz., it involves 4 weeks of contact classes and 12 weeks of distance learning in I and III Semesters and 3½ weeks of contact classes and 12½ weeks of distance learning in II and IV Semesters. In general, by studying 3 courses per semester, a student would be able to complete the programme in 2 years. Students may opt for the flexible option of taking fewer courses in a semester and completing the programme over 3 years (or more). This is based on the prerequisites for each course. During the distance period, each course requires an average of 8–10 hours of study per course per week. The contact classes are held at the Mumbai campus of TISS. Teaching–learning during the rest of the semester will be carried out based on planned weekly/fortnightly readings and regular assignments, primarily through web-based medium. Distribution of Credit Hours and Semester-wise Listing of Courses Contact Distance Total Credits Credits Total Time Title of the Course (1 credit = (1 credit = Credits Spent 15 hours) 30 hours) (in hours) Semester I (Odd Semester): 4 weeks of contact and 12 weeks of distance period BC 1 Philosophy of Education 2.5 2.5 5 112.5 BC 10 History of Education 2.5 2.5 5 112.5 BC 4 Child Development, Cognition and Learning I 2.5 2.5 5 112.5 Semester II (Even Semester): 3½ weeks of contact and 12½ weeks of distance period BC 2 Sociology of Education I 2.5 2.5 5 112.5 BC 7 Curriculum and School 2.5 2.5 5 112.5 OC A Optional Course 2.5 2.5 5 112.5 Semester III (Odd Semester): 4 weeks of contact and 12 weeks of distance period BC 5 Child Development, Cognition and Learning II 2.5 2.5 5 112.5 BC 6 Language, Mind and Society 2.5 2.5 5 112.5 BC 8 Research Methods 2.5 2.5 5 112.5 Semester IV (Even Semester): 3½ weeks of contact and 12½ weeks of distance period BC 3 Sociology of Education II 2.5 2.5 5 112.5 BC 9 Policy, Institutions and Practices 2.5 2.5 5 112.5 OC B Optional Course 2.5 2.5 5 112.5 FA Field Attachment and Paper Presentation 1 5 6 165 Total 31 35 66 1515 Note: BC: Basic Course; OC: Optional Course; FA: Field Attachment. Course No.

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Information Brochure: Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013

Basic Courses: The basic courses are compulsory and draw on the foundational areas of philosophy, sociology, economics, history and psychology. These address the need for an understanding of education in relation to areas such as metaphysics and the nature of knowledge, human nature, human development, learning and cognition, language and thought, the nature of Indian society and culture, education as a means of social transformation and social reproduction, etc. Basic courses introduce students to important theories, concepts and debates in these areas. Optional Courses: There are two groups of optional courses. Group I relates to pedagogy areas and includes courses which relate to the school subjects/academic disciplines and examine curriculum and pedagogy in these areas. The courses in this Group aim towards comprehending the nature of school knowledge and how children learn. It also includes organisation of learning processes covering curriculum, pedagogy and evaluation. Group II relates to thematic areas of contemporary significance. The courses in this Group provide opportunities to examine specific issues of particular relevance to Indian education. Optional Courses A, B, and C are to be chosen from the following with at least one option from each group. OC 1 OC 2 OC 3 OC 4

Optional Group I First Language Pedagogy Pedagogy of Mathematics Pedagogy of Social Studies Science Education

Optional Group II OC 5 Education Leadership and Management OC 6 Materials Design and Development OC 7 Teacher Professional Development OC 8 Gender and Education OC 9 Education of Children with Special Needs OC 10 Caste, Tribe and Education

Field Attachment: A compulsory Field Attachment is included to give students an opportunity to engage with professional practice, linked to a short research/project writing, to engage with documentation and research. The field attachment is linked to the subject area of one of the courses. The objective is to introduce the learner to a variety of field-based situations and work in elementary education and to provide an opportunity for reflection and writing on the same. Students’ field participation would enhance learning about innovations and practical issues on the ground. The duration of the Field Attachment is 50–60 hours or approximately 2 weeks, which is to be spent at a site of field activity, either within a government or non-governmental organisation. 3.15 M.A. WOMEN’S STUDIES The M.A. Women’s Studies is an interdisciplinary programme informed by contemporary feminist theory and praxis, focusing on processes for producing critical and socially relevant and interventionist knowledge. Women’s Studies is about integrating women’s experiences, realities and perspectives in mainstream/codified knowledge from where they have been left out or made invisible. It is about making women’s perspectives visible and central to understanding society, social structures and operations. It is about reclaiming women’s contributions to the development of cultures,

45

Information Brochure: Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013

nations and civilisations. It is also about changing structures of oppression, exploitation and neglect that have not only stifled women as individuals, but have also contributed to developing a lopsided/male-centric form of knowledge across disciplines. Women’s Studies is, thus, about creating a multi-disciplinary new knowledge wherein feminism has an integral, ideological and foundational relevance. The students will have an opportunity to experience a wide range of courses linking feminist theories, women’s movements, women’s development, and critiques of mainstream development that excludes women; while also preparing students to do feminist research and documentation and learn organisational skills needed to work with women and institutions. The course is flexible to accommodate students with focus on both research and field work/intervention-related knowledge and skills. Students doing this Master's Degree Programme may find their professional careers in diverse settings such as in academia as researchers and teachers; in journalism; as development workers and activists; in civil and administrative functions of the government, especially women and gender departments; in national and international organisations working on women and gender issues. In fact, this programme will be useful to people from all development fields who would like to use feminist knowledge to question, critique and make for changes in whatever area of work they may be involved in. Distribution of Credit Hours Courses

Credits

Foundation Courses

6

Women’s Studies (WS) Courses

46

Research Method Courses

4

Research Project with Dissertation (Optional)

6

Field Attachment

6

TOTAL

68

All Courses and the Field Attachment are compulsory. However, in lieu of the Research Dissertation, students may select 3 optional courses from other concurrently running M.A. Programmes across the Schools, in 2nd, 3rd and 4th Semesters. Semester-wise Listing of Courses Semester Course No. Title of the Courses

I

Credits

FC 1

Understanding Society

2

FC 2

Introduction to Basic Economics

2

FC 3

Development Experience, State, Social Conflict and Change

2

WS 1

Women, History and Society: Feminist Theories and Perspectives

4

WS 2.1

Women’s Movement in India: Part – I

2

DS 3

Methods of Social Research

4

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Information Brochure: Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013

Semester Course No. Title of the Courses

II

III

IV

Credits

WS 2.2

Women’s Movement in India: Part – II

2

WS 4

Gender, Caste, Class, Religion and Tribe

4

WS 5

Feminist Research Methodology/Practices

2

WS 6

Women and Work: History of Transformation

2

WS 7

Working with Women: Understanding Interventions

2

WS 8

Women, Sexualities and Violence

2

WS 3

Feminist Science Studies: An Introduction

2

WS 9

Women’s Writings

2

WS 10

Gender Media and Culture

2

WS 11

Gender, Poverty and Livelihoods

4

WS 12

Women, Development Practice and Politics

2

WS 13

Gender, Health and Rights

2

WS 14

Engendering Governance

2

WS 15

Genderr, Ideology and Education

2

WS 16

Women’s Bodies, Women’s Knowledges: Historical and Feminist Perspectives

2

WS 17

Eco-Feminism, Environment and Sustainable Development

2

WS 18

Women’s Rights and Legal Advocacy

2

WS 19

Gender and International Development

2

Research Dissertation (Optional)

6

Field Attachment with Analytical Report

6

Note: The semester-wise listing of courses is provisional and may change.

SCHOOL OF HABITAT STUDIES 3.16 M.A./M.SC. IN HABITAT POLICY AND PRACTICE The School of Habitat Studies (referred henceforth as the school) is a pioneering initiative of Tata Institute of Social Sciences. The initiative is focused on interdisciplinary studies in the arena of habitat studies, cutting across the boundaries of physical, technical, and social sciences. Habitat is understood by the school as an inclusive term encompassing the space, location, physical environs of human settlements, as well as the inhabitants and social environs of these settlements in urban, peri-urban, and even rural areas. For the school, study of Habitat, includes study of diverse factors and aspects of Habitat such as livelihoods activities, social composition, and rights of the inhabitants as well as the resources, infrastructure, and services needed by inhabitants of these habitats for conducting their lives and livelihoods and for satisfying their diverse needs. The school’s scope also encompasses broader consideration of the relationships between science, technology, innovation and society.

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Information Brochure: Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013

The M.A./M.Sc. in Habitat Policy and Practice program is envisaged to be focused on policy, planning and practice. Here, the term ‘policy’ is meant to cover different official-legal and administrative-instruments, for example, laws, rules, regulations, policy recommendations, project guidelines, government resolutions, procedures, and norms. These instruments, together, provide an official (policy) framework for the stakeholders to operate in the Habitat sector. Further, the term practice is used here to identify activities that more directly engage with formulating, implementing, analysing, evaluating, and advocating policies on behalf of different stakeholders. The program will involve training in policies from different sectors which are directly connected with the Habitat sector. The programme is aimed at creating a cadre of professionals-having multidimensional understanding and multifarious capabilities-who would be able to comprehend and deal with the complex challenges thrown up by the recent developments on the urban scene. Key Features The focus of the programme — as discussed before — is on policy and related practice. Further, as far as the substance is concerned, the programme, to begin with, will be focused on urban and peri-urban issues and processes. The programme will start with multi-disciplinarity and strive to achieve inter-disciplinarity, the transition being driven by the needs and demands of the ground-reality. It would strive to bring together disciplines not only within social sciences or within physical or engineering/technical sciences, but disciplines from all these three groupings. Efforts to impart multidimensional understanding and multifarious capabilities will be founded on efforts-through a group of courses-to develop a perspective among students that is broad, socially inclusive, democratic, technically informed, and culturally as well as environmentally sensitive. Another distinguishing feature of the program will be its strong linkages with the ground-reality and commitment to respond to the needs and aspirations of different stake-holders, especially the disadvantaged and vulnerable sections of society. This understanding will permeate through and shape all the different components of the programme. n n

n

n

n

n

Semester-wise and Component-wise Distribution of Credits Component (Total Credits) Foundation Courses (6 Credits) Perspective Course (10 Credits) Concepts and Theory Courses (11 Credits) Sectoral and Policy Courses (16 Credits) Elective Courses (2 Credits) Methods and Skills Courses (NC + 17 Credits) Field and Practical Work (NC + 4 Credits) Practice Concentration (12 Credits) Total Credits (Total Credits 78)

Sem. I 6 2 7 4 NC + 2 NC 19

Sem. II 2 4 6 6 1 19

Sem. III 6 6 7 NC + 1 4 24

Sem. IV 2 2 2 2 8 16

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Information Brochure: Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013

Semester and Listing of Courses Semester Course No. Title of the Courses FC 1 Understanding Society FC 2 Introduction to Basic Economic FC 3 Development Experience, State, Social Conflict and Change HP 1 Sociological Perspectives on Urban and Regional Development HP 2 Public Policy and Governance: Theory, Analysis and Advocacy HP 3 Ecology and Urban Environment I HP 4 Basic Technical Capabilities of Habitat Professionals HP 5 Urban Livelihood and Housing – I HP 12 Habitat Planning: Theory and Practice HP 7 Communication HP 8 Quantitative Research Methods Practical Field Work — Exposure Visit HP 10 Political Economy of Urbanization in South HP 9 Qualitative Research Methods HP 11 Urban Economics and Urban Finance II (cont.) HP 6 Urban Transport and Infrastructure: Policies and Practices HP 13 Public Finance HP 14 Urban Livelihood and Housing – II HP 15 Urban Water and Sanitation and Solid Waste – I HP 16 Urban Governance in India: Policies and Practices HP 17 Planning Studio 1 II HP 18 Comprehensive Assessments of Projects Group Field Work HP 19/ Sustainable Development and Climate Change DS 15 HP 20 Gender, Design and Urban Experience HP 21 Social Sector Issues in Cities HP 22 Urban Water and Sanitation and Solid Waste – II HP 23 Community Group Work HP 24 Introduction to GIS III HP 25 Advanced Econo-Financial Analysis HP 26 Analysis of Legal Instruments HP 27 Analysis of Macro Data Policy Practicum Purposive Field Visits HP 28 Concentration Work – I HP 29 Concentration Work – II

Credits 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 2 2 Non-Credit 2 Non-Credit 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 4 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 Non-Credit 2 2

Information Brochure: Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013 Semester Course No. Title of the Courses HP 30 Seminar: Contemporary Issues and Topics in Habitat Sector HP 31 Elective Project Management IV HP 32 Policy Assignment Project/Dissertation

49 Credits 2 2 2 2 8

JAMSETJI TATA CENTRE FOR DISASTER MANAGEMENT 3.17 M.A./M.SC. IN DISASTER MANAGEMENT Disaster Management is emerging globally as a full-fledged academic discipline. The M.A./M.Sc. programme in Disaster Management aims at enhancing knowledge, capacities, skills and perspective on disasters. While enabling an understanding of disasters from the vantage point of science and technology in prediction, mitigation and response, the programme will also foster a critical and reflective appreciation of current debates in disaster management within the framework of social and environmental justice, state and civil society dynamics, development, conflict and displacement and globalisation. Students of social sciences, environmental sciences, engineers, medical and health professionals, architects, mid-career bureaucrats and armed forces personnel have joined this programme. The design of this Master’s programme includes thematic and issue-based courses, such as the relationship between environment, livelihood and disasters; hazards, risks and vulnerability; institutions, governance and disaster-preparedness and response; and knowledge systems and disaster management. In the first year, the programme offers a strong multi-disciplinary knowledge base and will enhance critical skills essential for intervention in disasters and their prevention. In the second year, the programme provides the opportunity to develop expertise in a range of areas such as governance, geo-informatics, logistics and supply chain management, public health, peace, conflict and human security, etc. It also enhances research aptitude through research dissertation and term papers. The programme, however, will follow a pre-determined calendar. As an emerging field, the need for qualified personnel within disaster management is high. Students graduating with this degree are likely to be employed as disaster/ emergency management specialists in India and abroad. Prospective employers include government and non-government agencies and research institutions. Each state in India is mandated to set up a State Disaster Management Authority, State Institute of Disaster Management, and an Emergency Operation Centre at State level. Most of the districts are also implementing the Disaster Risk Management programme and initiating a Disaster Management Planning process with the establishment of a District Control Room. With an increased understanding of the relation between poverty, empoverishment and vulnerability to disasters, voluntary agencies as well as international organisations and funding organisations are also taking keen interest in Disaster Management. All this

50

Information Brochure: Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013

offers career opportunities to graduates of Disaster Management. The field also offers significant scope of engagement as independent professionals with government and non-government sectors. Equipped with a capacity for critical reflection, students of this programme could also go on to pursue research, training and teaching careers in diverse disciplines. Distribution of Credit Hours Year

Semester Detail Courses I Study Visit First Courses II Internship III Courses Second Internship IV Research Project/Courses TOTAL

Credits 16 2 14 6 18 8 6 70

Semester-Wise Listing of Courses Semester Course No. Title of the Courses FC 1 Understanding Society

I

II

Credits 2

FC 2

Introduction to Basic Economics

2

FC 3

Development Experience, State, Social Conflict and Change

2

MDM 1

Introduction to Hazards and Disaster Management

2

MDM 2

Technology, Environment and Disasters

2

MDM 5

Introduction to Remote Sensing and Geographical Information System (GIS) Techniques

2

MDM 6

Research Methodology – I

2

MDM 13

Public Health and Disasters

2

MDM 29

Study Visits and Tutorials

2

FC 4

Human Development, Identity, Culture and Media

2

FC 5

Disasters and Development: Bridge Foundation Course

2

MDM 3

Disaster Risk Reduction and Development Planning

2

MDM 4

Approaches and Planning for Response: Standards in Humanitarian Aid, Relief, Rehabilitation and Development

2

MDM 7

Research Methodology – II

2

MDM 11

Governance, Law and Policy in Disaster Management

2

MDM 12

Seminar Course in Disasters

2

MDM 30

Field Work — Internship – I

6

51

Information Brochure: Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013 Semester Course No. Title of the Courses MDM 8 Project Management in Disaster Contexts

III

IV

Credits 2

MDM 9

Introduction to Disaster Financing

2

MDM 10

Principles of Management and Introduction to Supply Chain Management

2

Concentration Courses – I

6

Concentration Courses – II

6

MDM 31

Field Work — Internship – II

8

MDM 32

Research Dissertation/Concentration Courses

MDM 33

Optional — Term Paper (2)

6

Concentrations Students who opt for research dissertation will choose any two concentrations. Students who opt out of research dissertation will have to complete the two credit self-study courses and two other courses in addition to any two concentrations. The table below presents the four courses under each concentration. The first course listed for each concentration is a compulsory course for all students and will be completed over the first, second and third semesters. Sl. No.

I

II

III

IV

Public Health and Disaster Management

Courses MDM 13: MDM 14: MDM 15: MDM 16:

Governance in Disaster Management

MDM 11: MDM 17: MDM 18: MDM 19:

Concentration

MDM 11: Conflicts, Peace MDM 20: and MDM 21: Development MDM 22: MDM 10: Logistics MDM 23: Management and Service Delivery MDM 24: Systems MDM 25:

Public Health in Disasters Public Health Planning and Management for Disasters – I Public Health Planning and Management for Disasters – II Seminar Course in Emerging Issues in Public Health with regard to Disasters Governance, Law and Policy in Disaster Management Transnational Governance, Politics and Disasters Governance and Disaster Risk Reduction Empowerment, People-Centred Governance and Disaster Risk Reduction Governance, Law and Policy in Disaster Management Conflicts and Conflict Analysis Conflicts and Humanitarian Crises Conflict Transformation, Peace and Just Development Principles of Management and Introduction to Supply Chain Management Fundamentals of Logistics and Disaster Management Distribution Networks in Disasters: Transportation, Warehousing and Inventory Management Strategic Planning in Disaster Logistics and Performance Analysis

52

Information Brochure: Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013

Sl. No.

V

Courses MDM 5:

Concentration

Introduction to Remote Sensing and Geographical Information System (GIS) Techniques MDM 26: Digital Image Processing and GIS Data Management MDM 27: Application of Remote Sensing in Disaster Management MDM 28: Application of Geoinformatics in Disaster Studies

Geographical Information Systems in Disaster Management

Facilitating Multi-Level Entry Exit The programme is also aimed at facilitating multi level entry and exit for mid-career professionals. The following tables illustrate the placement and distribution of courses and credits across semesters. Disaster Management – Year I

Certificate Diploma Masters

9 9 9

Year – I 18 18 8 18 8

2 2 2

Total Credits

Internship

Credits

Courses

Study Visits

Credits 16 16 16

Semester II Total Credits

Semester I

Courses

Programme

Total of I & II *

14 14

6 6

20 20

38 38

*Master’s students would have accumulated 38 credits in Semesters I and II

Disaster Management – Year II

Masters 9 18 Total Credits of First and Second Year

-

CENTRE FOR MEDIA

18

AND

6

Total Credits

Internship 8

Research/ Course

Semester IV Total Credits

Study Visits

Credits

Semester III

Courses

Programme

14

Total of III & IV

32 38 + 32 = 70

CULTURAL STUDIES

3.18 M.A. MEDIA AND CULTURAL STUDIES The M.A. Media and Cultural Studies aims at honing the skills of media production and research within a framework that enables the development of a critical perspective on media, culture and society. In contemporary society, media and

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Information Brochure: Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013

culture are crucial sites where identities are produced and popular ways of seeing are consumed. Cultural Studies enables us to meaningfully engage and interact with these new modes of being and doing. By making us conscious of the many complex ways in which power impinges on our lives and constructs our cultures, it has the potential of empowering us to critically read the media and other cultural institutions and texts, to understand how they shape our identities and to think about how we could possibly shape them. This programme imparts intensive hands-on training in video production, including direction, research, scripting, editing, cameras and sound. It also has a strong research focus. This will enable students to produce documentaries and short films. The programme culminates in the production of a documentary and a dissertation. It also teaches basic skills in community radio, graphics and web design. The students have access to the well-equipped facilities and the visual archive of the Centre. The teachers of the programme would include Centre and TISS faculty as well as visiting professionals. With its unique blend of theory and practice, the M.A. Media and Cultural Studies works towards the creation of a lively group of media ‘thinking do-ers’ and ‘doing thinkers’ who could then choose to branch out into a diverse range of work or educational situations. The students of this programme are equipped to work in the areas of media and television production, independent media practice, media education, advocacy and research. Potential employers include television production houses, educational and research institutions, NGOs, and governmental agencies. Distribution of Credit Hours Year First

Detail Courses Courses Media Project Second Dissertation Internship TOTAL

Credits 35 21 6 4 4 70

Semester-Wise Listing of Courses Semester Course No. FC 1 FC 2 FC 3 MC 1 I MC 2 MC 3 MC 4 LC 1

Title of the Courses Understanding Society Introduction to Basic Economics Development Experience, State, Social Conflict and Change Media Studies: An Introduction Cultural Studies: An Introduction Ways of Knowing Image Making – I Video Production

Credits 2 2 2 2 3 2 2 4

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Information Brochure: Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013

Semester Course No. Title of the Courses MC 5 Working with Video – I MC 6 Image Making – II MC 7 Media and Cultural Studies Research II MC 10 Reading Film LC 2 Writing Skills LC 3 Video Post-production MC 8 Mediated Development MC 9 Working with Video – II OC 1 Television Studies OC 2 Gender, Media and Culture III OC 3 ICTs for Development OC 4 Cyberculture-An Introduction MC 15 Seminar II: Presentation of Media Project LC 4 Visual Design LC 5 Community Radio MP MCS Media Project MR MCS Research Project Term Paper MC11 Seminar I: Presentation of Research Project Alt to MR 2 additional optional courses plus a term paper IV +MC 11 OC 5 Web Design OC 6 Understanding Art and Music OC 7 Gender, Culture and Space OC 8 Media and Law Internship

SCHOOL

OF

Credits 3 2 2 3 2 4 2 4 2 2 2 2 2 3 2 6 4 2 2 6 2 2 2 2 4

RURAL DEVELOPMENT

3.19 M.A. SOCIAL WORK IN RURAL DEVELOPMENT The M.A. Social Work in Rural Development programme has been designed to meet the need for trained social work professionals in designing and managing rural development programmes and to cater to the increasing demand for development professionals with advanced social work skills. The graduates of this Master’s programme will, therefore, command greater acceptance and recognition by organisations of national and international repute. The Tuljapur Campus of TISS offers an excellent environment for learning and practice of rural development through its innovative academic curriculum and opportunity to interact with field practitioners and social activists in the region. A strong, multidisciplinary faculty drawn from social work, philosophy, sociology, economics, agriculture, etc. teach this programme.

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Information Brochure: Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013

TISS students are highly valued in governmental and non-governmental organisations and agencies for their sound professional skills and rigorous field-based training. The MA Social Work in Rural Development post-graduates command excellent job opportunities with such organisations. Distribution of Credits Year

Detail Foundation Courses First Core Courses Field Work Core Courses Electives Second Field Work Dissertation and Viva-Voce TOTAL

Credits 16 14 10 22 4 5 5 76

Semester-wise Listing of Courses Semester Course No. Course Title

I

FC 1

Understanding Society

2

FC 2

Introduction to Political Economy

2

FC 3

State, Democracy and Polity

2

FC 4

Professional Social Work: History and Ideologies

2

CC 1

Social Work Methods: Working with Individuals, Groups and Communities

2

CC 2

Philosophy of Social Sciences Research

2

CC 6

Rural Development Experience: A Cross Country Analysis

2

Field Work

II

5

FC 5

India's Development Experience

2

FC 6

Social Aspects of Poverty and Theories of Justice

2

FC 7

Social Movements and Rural Transformation

2

FC 8

Indian Constitution and Decentralised Rural Development

2

CC 3

Quantitative and Qualitative Research Methods

2

CC 4

Concept, History and Theories of Development

2

CC 7

Advanced Social Work Skills and Tools for Rural Development

2

CC 8

Environment, Climate Change and Development

2

Field Work

III

Credits

5

CC 5

Social Policy Analysis

2

CC 9

Farm Non-Farm Linkages and Livelihood Issues

2

CC 10

Modes of Natural Resources Use and Sustainable Rural Development

2

CC 12

Technology and Development Rural Development Projects: Policy

2

56

Information Brochure: Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013

Semester Course No. Course Title

Credits

CC 18

Planning and Management

2

CC 17

Development Organisation and Management

2

Executive Courses (choose any One Elective from the List) III

EC 1

Gender and Development

EC 2

Advanced Dalit and Tribal Social Work Practice Skills

EC 5

Multilaterial Institutions and Rurla Development

Field Work

IV

2

5

CC 11

Food Security, Right to Food and Rural Livelihoods

2

CC 13

Rural/Agro-Based Industries and Rural Marketing

2

CC 14

Models of Rural Entrepreneurship

2

CC 15

Financial Inclusion and Microfinance

2

CC 16

Financial Management and Accounting

2

Executive Courses (choose any One Elective from the List) EC 2

Development Communication

EC 4

Corporate Social Initiatives

EC 6

Disaster Management

EC 7

Microfinance Institutions and Rural Insurance

Dissertation

2

2 5 (4+1)

4 Fees, Deposits and Other Charges 4.1

TOTAL PROPOSED FEES FOR 2011–2013 BATCH (In Rupees) SEMESTER FEES FOR HOSTELITES

Programme

SEMESTER FEES FOR NON- HOSTELITES

I

II

III

IV

I

II

III

IV

Social Work

47,650

33,650

32,650

28,650

26,000

17,900

16,900

12,900

Social Work in Disability Studies and Action

47,650

33,650

32,650

28,650

26,000

17,900

16,900

12,900

Globalisation and Labour

43,150

31,650

28,150

26,650

21,500

15,900

12,400

10,900

Human Resources Management and Labour Relations

48,150

31,650

33,150

26,650

26,500

15,900

17,400

10,900

Social Entrepreneurship

43,150

31,650

28,150

26,650

21,500

15,900

12,400

10,900

Health Administration

45,150

33,650

30,150

28,650

23,500

17,900

14,400

12,900

Hospital Administration

45,150

33,650

30,150

28,650

23,500

17,900

14,400

12,900

Public Health in Health Policy, Economics and Finance

45,150

33,650

30,150

28,650

23,500

17,900

14,400

12,900

Public Health in Social Epidemiology

45,150

33,650

30,150

28,650

23,500

17,900

14,400

12,900

Counselling

46,650

35,150

31,650

30,150

25,000

19,400

15,900

14,400

Development Studies

43,150

31,650

28,150

26,650

21,500

15,900

12,400

10,900

Elementary (Education)

34,650

23,150

19,650

18,150

21,500

15,900

12,400

10,900

Women's Studies

43,150

31,650

28,150

26,650

21,500

15,900

12,400

10,900

Habitat Policy and Practice

44,650

34,650

29,650

29,650

23,000

18,900

13,900

13,900

Disaster Management

56,650

34,150

28,150

30,150

35,000

18,400

12,400

14,400

Media and Cultural Studies

53,150

41,650

38,150

36,650

31,500

25,900

22,400

20,900

Social Work in Rural Development

44,300

35,800

27,300

26,800

23,400

20,800

12,300

11,800

58

4.2 1.

Information Brochure: Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013

FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE For students of M.A. Education (Elementary) programme, the following types of financial assistance are available on merit-cum-means. Fee Waiver Travel and Stay Support (for contact classes and field attachment) Computer and Internet Support (at home station) Award of these will be decided based on the application of selected candidates during the Semester I contact period. For students of other Master’s Degree Programmes, a few Scholarships on the basis of Merit, and ‘Merit-cum-Need basis are available. Financial assistance may also be available from the Students’ Welfare Fund of the Institute. n n n

2.

5 Students’ Support Services 5.1

STUDENTS’ AFFAIRS OFFICE

The Students’ Affairs Office is the fundamental link between students, faculty and the administration of TISS. Headed by the Dean (Students’ Affairs), the purpose of the Office is to create a climate which promotes personal and academic development of students by offering them both support and challenges. Support is provided by assisting students directly or through referrals. The Office seeks to provide challenge by holding students accountable for their actions and by assisting them in developing problem-solving skills. The Office, thus, strives to help students in their adjustment to TISS life and help them to take full advantage of the academic or social environment here. Towards this, the Students’ Affairs Office looks into the physical and mental well-being of students through services such as counselling, extra-curricular activities such as yoga and gymming, as well as promoting cultural activities. Maintaining tolerance and respect for cultural diversity and plurality is an essential cornerstone of student life at TISS. Students at TISS are welcomed regardless of religion, caste, ethnic background, age, sexual orientation or physical status. Several well-established committees for Student Aid, Gender Amity, Support Facilities for Students, Medical Health Services, as also a team of professional counsellors and male and female wardens — all coordinated by the faculty at TISS — form the backbone of this office. The Institute expects that all student members of its community assume responsibility for their conduct. However, when they infringe on the rights of others, the Institute may intervene through the laid down established procedures. 5.2

STUDENTS’ UNION

The Institute has a healthy tradition of electing a Students’ Union by secret ballot. Returning Officers are appointed to oversee the process. Office bearers of the Union have been responsible students who have contributed to student life through their leadership. During critical periods, such as disasters and relief work, they have been at the forefront of volunteering for tasks as well as mobilising their colleagues. 5.3

ACCOMMODATION/HOSTELS

Admission to the hostels is restricted to full-time, bona fide, Master’s degree students. Hostel admission is not guaranteed. Deputed candidates, holding government accommodation in Mumbai (general category or SC/ST), will not be allotted hostel accommodation. Due to limited seats in the hostel, accommodation is not available for students who ordinarily reside in the Mumbai Metropolitan Region. Out-of-town students, who have close relatives in Mumbai, will also not be given hostel accommodation.

60

5.4

Information Brochure: Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013

DINING HALL

The Dining Hall serves both vegetarian and non-vegetarian meals. It is managed by the DH Committee with student representatives as members and with a member of the Faculty as its Chairperson. It is open for all the Master’s degree students, M.Phil. and Ph.D. scholars, Institute staff, participants of all the short-term courses and seminars held at the Institute. The Dining Hall will be closed by 11.00 p.m. Default in the payment of dining hall charges will result in penalties and cancellation of dining hall membership and even hostel residence. Re-admission may be considered on payments of all dues as a fresh candidate. The Institute is currently working with the students to encourage them to take greater control of the management of the DHs. Students on campus also enjoy a canteen facility which was initiated in June 2006. In keeping with the overall ethos of the Institute, management of the canteen has been given to an NGO devoted to women’s empowerment. The canteen is run by a self-help group of woman rag-pickers. 5.5

HEALTH CARE

Two Medical Officers visit the Institute — one every Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 4.00 p.m. to 6.00 p.m. and the other every Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday from 4.30 p.m. to 6.30 p.m. The Institute provides free medical consultation service only. The medical officers also provide referrals as and when required. The programme is coordinated by the Coordinator (Medical and Counselling), who is a faculty member of the Institute. 5.6

COUNSELLING SERVICES

Trained professionals provide counselling services from Monday to Saturday for 3 hours every day. The counsellors help the students in their day-to-day concerns and also enhance their overall functioning. A senior faculty member from TISS coordinates the Medical and Counselling services. Workshops on topics relevant to increasing the capacities of the students are regularly conducted by the counsellors. 'Time Management', 'Stress Management', 'Building Emotional Resilience', and 'Enhancing Inter-personal Relationships'. The Counselling Centre also has an established Peer-support Programme and provides training to student volunteers. The counsellors also maintain a notice board where posters, charts and cartoons pertaining to various issues are exhibited. The e-mail is yet another medium of communication for the students and the counsellors wherein the students can write to the counsellors for appointments or asking for help. The counsellors use e-mails to communicate information about workshops, send articles, and even for follow-up with students needing frequent attention. This has evoked a positive response from the students.

Information Brochure: Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013

5.7

61

HEALTH INSURANCE

The Institute has a Group Mediclaim and Group Personal Accident Insurance Policy for students, the details of which are hosted on wwww.tiss.edu/insurance. The premium for the same is to be paid at the time of paying the first semester and third semester tuition fees. 5.8

SPORTS AND RECREATION

The M.K. Tata Memorial Gymkhana and Recreation Centre includes facilities such as gym, yoga, table tennis, carom, badminton. An aerobics programme is being introduced from this academic year to encourage physical fitness activities amongst students. The Gym is located on the first floor of the Gymkhana and is well equipped with the latest equipment. Gym training is conducted under the supervision of trained instructors (6.00 to 9.00 a.m. and5.00 to 8.00 p.m. from Monday to Saturday. Yoga programme is conducted every morning (700 to 8.00 a.m.) and evening (6.00 to 7.00 p.m.) from Monday to Saturday, at the ground floor of the M.K. Tata Memorial Gymkhana. The Students’ Union organises friendly sporting events (both outdoor and indoor), and the Annual Sports day is a much awaited day in the sports calendar for students, staff and faculty alike. Cultural activities such as celebration of national holidays, the Spic-Macay music festival, food festivals, and the three-day 'TISS Cultural Fest — Quintessence’ (fondly referred to as Quinty) — form some of the cultural highlights of life on the campus.

6 Information for International Students, Applying for Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013 6.1

INTRODUCTION

Admission of International Students to all the Master’s Degree programmes offered by TISS is done through the International Students’ Office (ISO) of TISS. Students are admitted in the beginning of the degree programme. In addition, students can be admitted at any time during the year to customised short-term courses. All foreign nationals (holding citizenship other than Indian or in addition to that of Indian) are eligible to apply as International Students. 6.2

ELIGIBILITY

The qualifications required for eligibility for admission to the different programmes courses can be checked in detail from the Information Brochure. Only those students who have qualified from foreign Universities or Boards of Higher Education, recognised as equivalent by the Association of Indian Universities (AIU) are eligible for admission. When required, a reference will be made to the AIU to check the equivalence. The student should submit the documents mentioned in the eligibility form in order to check equivalence through the AIU, along with the applications. For all Master’s degree programmes at TISS, International Students from non-English speaking countries or those who have not completed their degree course in the English medium should submit the TOEFL scores. Students from developed countries should submit the GMAT scores for M.A. HRM&LR. For all other Master’s Degree programmes, GRE scores are necessary. Institute code for all these examinations are (1) GRE D12102, (2) TOFEL 2102 and (3) GMAT 66X-QL-51. 6.3

TRANSFERS AND CHANGE OF PROGRAMMES

An International Student who has been granted admission to a particular programme shall not be allowed to change the programme. In exceptional cases, the ISO may permit this, based on eligibility rules and permission of the Competent Authority of the Institution. 6.4

GOVERNMENT OF INDIA SCHOLARS

International students who are awarded scholarships by the Indian Council for Cultural Relations (ICCR), New Delhi, will get preference, while granting admission. Sponsored candidates from different foreign governments for training studies will also be given preference for the same.

Information Brochure: Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013

6.5

63

PROCEDURE FOR ADMISSION

Stage 1: Preliminary Procedure (February 28, 2011) 1. Apply for admission in the prescribed Application Form, downloadable from the Institute Website, along with a demand draft of US$120 drawn in favour of Tata Institute of Social Sciences, payable at Mumbai, towards application processing charges for first programme, and US$ 30 for each additional programme (non-refundable). A candidate may apply upto three programmes. Send the Application Form along with the Demand Draft to the Institute’s International Students’ Office. 2.

Fill and submit the eligibility form, along with copies of certificates listed in the eligibility form. (a) Degree certificate along with transcript from his/her university as proof of eligibility. (b) Write a note on motivation for applying to the programme (upto 500 words). (c) Give two references, one of whom should be his/her teacher at the undergraduate level. The referees should provide information regarding the candidate’s academic interest and calibre, character and suitability for the programme in a sealed envelope. These two references should accompany the application. (d) After the student is admitted to a programme he/she will be required to pay a fee of US $100 for AIU equivalence.

Stage 2: April 9 to 10, 2011 Once the Institute ascertains the eligibility of the candidate to apply for the programme, the following steps are initiated: 1.

Write an essay upto 1500–2000 words in the English language on a topic intimated through e-mail and submit the same through e-mail as well. Intimation on the essay topic will be given on April 6, 2011, and the completed essay must be submitted on the same day after 1.5 hours, which will be timed by the ISO

2.

Candidates will go through a telephone interview on a designated day between April 19 and 23, 2011.

3.

List of selected candidates will be announced on April 30, 2011.

Stage 3: Obtain Student Visa, Pay Fees 1. A provisional admission letter will be sent to the candidate to secure a student visa to India. 2.

The student visa is a compulsory GoI requirement for admission to the Institute. The visa should indicate: (i) the name of the Institute, (ii) title of the programme, and (iii) the period of study at the Institute.

64

Information Brochure: Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013

Stage 4: Report to the Institute by June 1. Undergo the medical examination and get the medical fitness certificate. All International Students will be required to pay medical fees of US $60. 2.

The candidate should produce original documents at the time of verification of documents. Once verification is over, the original documents will be returned to the candidates immediately.

3.

Admission of International Students will be confirmed only after verification of original certificates, medical fitness test and payment of required fees.

4.

All International Students should register their names with the police in the Foreigner Regional Registration Office (FRRO) of the local Police, within 2 weeks of arrival in India.

6.6

FEE STRUCTURE FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS

6.6.1 Fees for International Students from SAARC Countries (except Nepal and Bhutan) and Low Income Countries (in Indian Rupees) SEMESTER Total Proposed Fees for 2011–2013 Batch I

II

III

IV

Social Work

28,600

19,690

18,590

14,190

Social Work in Disability Studies and Action

28,600

19,690

18,590

14,190

Development Studies

23,650

17,490

13,640

11,990

Women’s Studies

23,650

17,490

13,640

11,990

Health Administration

25,850

19,690

15,840

15,840

Hospital Administration

25,850

19,690

15,840

15,840

Public Health in Health Policy, Economics and Finance

25,850

19,690

15,840

15,840

Public Health in Social Epidemiology

25,850

19,690

15,840

15,840

Human Resources Management and Labour Relations

23,650

17,490

13,640

11,990

Social Entrepreneurship

23,650

17,490

13,640

11,990

Globalisation and Labour

23,650

17,490

13,640

11,990

Disaster Management

38,500

20,240

13,640

15,840

Media and Cultural Studies

34,650

28,490

24,640

22,990

Social Work in Rural Development

28,600

19,690

18,590

141,90

Note: All Students have to pay US $500 as Entrance Fee at the time of admission.

65

Information Brochure: Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013

6.6.2 Fees for International Students from Developed Countries (in US Dollars) SEMESTER Total Proposed Fees for 2011-2013 Batch I

II

III

IV

Social Work

3,710

3,000

3,060

3,000

Social Work in Disability Studies and Action

3,710

3,000

3,060

3,000

Development Studies

3,310

2,600

2,660

2,600

Women’s Studies

3,310

2,600

2660

2,600

Health Administration

3,710

3,000

3,060

3,000

Hospital Administration

3,710

3,000

3,060

3,000

Public Health in Health Policy, Economics and Finance

3,710

3,000

3,060

3,000

Public Health in Social Epidemiology

3,710

3,000

3,060

3,000

Human Resources Management and Labour Relations

3,710

3,000

3,060

3,000

Social Entrepreneurship

3,710

3,000

3,060

3,000

Globalisation and Labour

3,710

3,000

3,060

3,000

Disaster Management

4,210

3,500

3,560

3,500

Media and Cultural Studies

4,710

3,500

3,560

3,500

Social Work in Rural Development

3,710

3,000

3,060

3,000

6.7

DISCIPLINE

International Students will abide by all rules of the Institute and the code of conduct as applicable to Indian students doing the same programme. 6.8

EXAMINATION AND AWARD OF DEGREES AND DIPLOMAS

The procedure for examination, payment of examination fees, issue of grad cards, issue of passing certificates and award of degrees will be same as for the Indian students doing same course.

7 Location, Access and Communication 7.1

MUMBAI CAMPUS

The two Mumbai Campuses of TISS — the Main Campus and the Malti and Jal A.D. Naoroji Campus Annexe — are both located in Deonar in the North-East Section of Greater Mumbai. The Main Campus is situated opposite the Deonar Bus Depot on V.N. Purav Marg (also earlier known as the Sion–Trombay Road). The Main Campus houses most of the Schools, Centres and the Administration. The Naoroji Campus is situated off V.N. Purav Marg on Deonar Farms Road. The nearest local railway station is ‘Govandi’. State Transport (ST) buses from Kolhapur, Solapur, Goa, Pune, and other cities pass by the Institute and the nearest ST bus stop is ‘Maitri Park’. The BEST bus stop near TISS is ‘Deonar Bus Depot’. Locations From Dadar Station From Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminus From Bandra Station From Kurla Station

: :

Bus Routes 92, 93, 504, 506, 521 (all Ltd.) 6 352, 358, 505 (all Ltd.) and 371 362 and 501 Ltd.

Taxi Fares (Approximate) Dadar to TISS CST to TISS Bombay Central to TISS Bandra to TISS Kurla to TISS

: : : : :

Rs. 140/Rs. 220/Rs. 175/Rs. 100/Rs. 60/-

Postal Address

:

V.N. Purav Marg, Deonar, Mumbai - 400 088

Admission Process Enquiries TISS C.A.R.E. :

022-4011 0457

Fax

:

91-22-2552 5050

E-mail

:

[email protected]

URL

:

http://www.tiss.edu

Information Brochure: Master’s Degree Programmes, 2011–2013

7.2

67

TULJAPUR CAMPUS

The Tuljapur Campus of the Tata Institute of Social Sciences is situated on the North-West hills of Tuljapur town on Apsinga Road. Tuljapur town is in Osmanabad districtof Marathwada region, Maharashtra. It is on the National Highway No. 211. State Transport buses from Mumbai, Aurangabad, Solapur, Pune, and other cities (and buses from Karnataka and A.P.) pass through Tuljapur town. The nearest railway stations are Osmanabad and Solapur. Mosst trains from Mumbai and Pune towards South pass through Solapur. Some of the major trains are: Siddeshwar Express, Udyan Express, Karnataka Express, Hutatma Express, Jayanti Janata Kanyakuamri Express, Chennai Express, Hussain Sagar Express, Kurla Coimbatore Express, etc. Postal Address

:

Admission Process Enquiries TISS C.A.R.E. : URL

:

Tata Institute of Social Sciences School of Rural Development Tuljapur-413 601, District-Osmanabad Maharashtra, India 022-4011 0457

http://www.tiss.edu

NOTES ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________

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