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GRADUATE STUDENT MANUAL Spanish & Portuguese Program A guide for current and incoming graduate students and instructors.

Effective since Spring 2016

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CLASSICAL AND MODERN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES SPANISH & PORTUGUESE PROGRAM GRADUATE STUDENT MANUAL

TABLE OF CONTENTS GRADUATE STUDIES IN SPANISH AND PORTUGUESE AT CMLL WELCOME .......................................................................................................................................................................... 4 Graduate Studies in Spanish and Portuguese .......................................................................................................... 5 Admission Process ....................................................................................................................................................... 6 Readmission Process/Deferment Policies from the Graduate School ............................................................... 7 The Statement of Intent for M.A. or Ph.D. Applicants ......................................................................................... 8 FINANCIAL SUPPORT ......................................................................................................................................................... 9 Scholarships and Fellowships ................................................................................................................................... 11 Conditions of Employment For Teaching Assistants and Graduate Part-Time Instructors ......................... 14 Teaching for the Spanish Heritage Language Program ........................................................................................ 16 Departmental Termination Policy ........................................................................................................................... 17 M.A. IN ROMANCE LANGUAGES —SPANISH AND PH.D. HISPANIC LITERATURE CURRICULUM ...................... 18 M.A. IN ROMANCE LANGUAGES —SPANISH AND PH.D. IN SPANISH LINGUISTICS CURRICULUM ................... 19 PORTUGUESE PROGRAM: MINOR AT THE M.A. AND PH.D. LEVELS CURRICULUM ............................................ 20 THE ROMANCE LANGUAGE M.A. IN SPANISH HISPANIC LITERATURE TRACK..................................................................................................................................... 21 SPANISH LINGUISTICS TRACK ....................................................................................................................................... 22 Language Requirements for the M.A. Degree ....................................................................................................... 23 Degree plan forms for the M.A. student ................................................................................................................ 23 The M.A. Thesis Option ........................................................................................................................................... 26 The M.A. Thesis Declaration Form ........................................................................................................................ 27 The M.A. Exams ........................................................................................................................................................ 28 The M.A. Exam Committee Form .......................................................................................................................... 31 M.A. Thesis Proposal Guidelines ............................................................................................................................ 32 M.A. Reading List: Hispanic Literature .................................................................................................................. 34 M.A. Reading List: Spanish Linguistics................................................................................................................... 43 M.A. and Ph.D. Reading Lists: Portuguese ............................................................................................................ 46 Eligibility for the Doctoral Program ....................................................................................................................... 47 THE PH.D. IN SPANISH Degree Description .................................................................................................................................................... 48 HISPANIC LITERATURE TRACK..................................................................................................................................... 49 SPANISH LINGUISTICS TRACK ....................................................................................................................................... 49 Language Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree...................................................................................................... 51 Degree Plan forms for the Ph.D. student .............................................................................................................. 51 The Ph.D. Candidacy Process .................................................................................................................................. 54 The Ph.D. Exam Committee form.......................................................................................................................... 55 The Ph.D. Dissertation Committee Form ............................................................................................................. 56 External Committee Member................................................................................................................................... 57 The Dissertation Proposal ........................................................................................................................................ 58 Dissertation Proposal Guidelines ............................................................................................................................ 59 The Ph.D. Exams ....................................................................................................................................................... 61 Application for Doctoral Candidacy ....................................................................................................................... 64



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Changes in Dissertation Topic/ Changes on Dissertation Committees ........................................................... 64 The Ph.D. Dissertation ............................................................................................................................................. 65 ABD Report of Progress on Dissertation .............................................................................................................. 66 The Dissertation Defense ......................................................................................................................................... 67 SEVILLE TEACHING APPOINTMENT Seville Teaching Appointment Guidelines ............................................................................................................. 68 September Application Form ................................................................................................................................... 69 January Application Form ......................................................................................................................................... 70 M.A. AND PH.D. GRADUATE STUDIES PROCEDURES AND FORMS Registration for courses ............................................................................................................................................. 71 Schedule Approval Form .......................................................................................................................................... 72 Annual Reports ........................................................................................................................................................... 73 Academic Probation and Suspension ...................................................................................................................... 73 Continuous Enrollment ............................................................................................................................................ 74 M.A. AND PH.D. PETITIONS AND REQUIREMENT CHANGES DESCRIPTION .................................................................................................................................................................. 75 Independent Study Courses ...................................................................................................................................... 76 Independent Study Course Petition Form ............................................................................................................. 77 Courses outside of CMLL......................................................................................................................................... 78 Courses outside of CMLL Petition Form .............................................................................................................. 79 Leave of Absence ....................................................................................................................................................... 80 STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS WITHIN CMLL CÉFIRO: ENLACE CULTURAL Y LITERARIO .................................................................................................................. 81 Céfiro Journal ................................................................................................................................................................. 81

APPENDIX Graduate Application Change Form ....................................................................................................................... 82 Foreign Language Requirement for M.A. and Ph.D. students ........................................................................... 83 General Fellowships and Scholarships List ............................................................................................................ 84 Letter of Intent M.A. Exams .................................................................................................................................... 85 Letter of Intent Ph.D. Exams .................................................................................................................................. 86 M.A. Exams Report ................................................................................................................................................... 87 Qualifying Exam/ Ph.D. Exams Report ................................................................................................................ 88 Form for Reporting Changes of Thesis/Dissertation Title or Committee ....................................................... 89 M.A. Degree Plan ....................................................................................................................................................... 90 Ph.D. Degree Plan ..................................................................................................................................................... 91 Annual Report for M.A. and Ph. D. students ........................................................................................................ 92



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Welcome to the Texas Tech Spanish & Portuguese Graduate Program! We are pleased that you have chosen to continue your studies with us, and we are committed to providing a quality graduate learning environment that will enable you to pursue your advanced studies guided by graduate faculty with a passion for teaching, scholarship, and service. This Graduate Student Manual is your guide to the policies and procedures of our graduate programs. It explains curricula, contains sample forms, and communicates as much as possible how our programs work. In addition to this manual, all graduate students should obtain and carefully read the Texas Tech Catalog as well as the Graduate School webpage, which contain all updated policies, forms, deadlines and procedures required by the University.

Department Chair..................................................................................................... Dr. Erin Collopy Director of the Spanish & Portuguese Division ................................................. Dr. Susan Larson Spanish Graduate Advisor ............................................................................... ..Dr. John Beusterien Director of Lower-Level Spanish ....................................................................................................... Director, Spanish Heritage Language Program ................................................. Dr. Diego Pascual



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Graduate Studies in Spanish and Portuguese at CMLL The Spanish & Portuguese Program seeks to offer a wide range of compelling courses not only in the languages, literatures and cultures of the Spanish and Portuguese-speaking world but also in linguistics, film, critical theories, and a variety of interdisciplinary approaches that reflect the research and teaching interests of our dynamic and professionally active faculty. As a community of active scholars, we strive to offer to all our graduate students the opportunity for intellectual growth, for the development of critical and analytical skills, for the acquisition of a theoretical foundation for their work, and for the attainment of their professional development as teachers. In our M.A. program, we strive to provide our students with a comprehensive knowledge of major fields of expertise in the discipline through a curriculum that will encourage them to learn broadly and think deeply. At the Ph.D. level, we endeavor to help our students build on that comprehensive knowledge as they strengthen their theoretical framework and achieve a more advanced level of expertise in a chosen area of research in which they will make a contribution to the field through their doctoral dissertations.



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Admission Process ü To be admitted within our programs you must first apply to the Graduate School. ü Obtain official transcripts from all universities attended. ü Provide two recommendation letters from former professors. Applicants should complete and submit their applications on time and in accordance with the instructions provided on our webpage. This procedure lessens the chance of late or misplaced supporting documents and gives applicants more control over the entire process. Application Checklist • • • •

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GRE scores (for students whose undergraduate degree was completed within the United States). Unofficial TOEFL/IELTS scores (for International Students or students whose native language is other than English)* Official transcripts from all previously-attended universities. Statement of Purpose (500-700 words in Spanish): State the reasons why you are applying to this program, including a) your experience with the Spanish language, b) your experience with Hispanic cultures and literatures and c) their relationship to your future plans (See details below). Two letters of recommendations (at least one should be from a university professor). Brief curriculum vitae (1-2 pages). Academic writing sample in Spanish (5-7 pages for MA prospect students; 10-12 pages for PhD prospect students).

* Admitted students whose native language is other than English, and who do not submit GRE scores must complete one of the Texas Tech University approved English exams with a score of: 50 on a TOEFL paper exam 213 on a TOEFL computer exam 79 on a TOEFL Internet exam 6.5 on the IELTS If the student has a degree from a U.S. university, the TOEFL and/or IELTS may be waived provided that he/she is proficient in English.

English Proficiency Students' English proficiency will be determined by an approved ITA (International Teaching Assistant) staff member through a performance test or a Skype interview. All non-native speakers of English should contact Carla Burrus to comply with TTU requirements.



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For questions about your application to our programs, contact: Stephanie Santos CMLL Academic Advisor Texas Tech University Box 42071 Lubbock, TX 79409-2071 Email: [email protected]

Readmission Process/Deferment Policies from the Graduate School Students who fail to register or who leave school during a spring or fall semester must submit the “Graduate Application Change Form” (See Appendix) plus a non-refundable application change fee; the form and the current application change fee are both available on the website www.depts.ttu.edu/gradschool. Automatic readmission is not guaranteed. As specified in the TTU Catalog, departments will consider students on a case-by-case basis. The Office of Graduate Admissions will notify the applicant of the department’s decision via the Raiderlink portal. International and domestic students who wish to defer admission to a semester for which they did not originally apply must submit the “Graduate Application Change Form” plus a non-refundable application change fee; the form and the current application change fee are both available at www.depts.ttu.edu/gradschool. Deferral of admission is not guaranteed; departments will consider students on a case-by-case basis. The Office of Graduate Admissions will notify the student of the department’s decision via the Raiderlink portal.

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The Statement of Intent for M.A. or Ph.D. Applicants All applicants should state their reasons for applying to our graduate programs in a narrative format. This document is one of the most important components of the application and should be prepared thoughtfully. It may be written in English or Spanish. M.A. APPLICANTS For applicants to the M.A. program, the statement should include a description of their undergraduate studies, their experiences with the Spanish language, Hispanic cultures, and any additional practical knowledge; which bear on their qualifications or interest in graduate studies. The narrative should state a clear indication of the reasons for pursuing a graduate degree. Applicants should describe their specific interests within the programs offered by the Division of Spanish and Portuguese within CMLL, and should indicate why they have chosen Texas Tech University. In addition, applicants should outline their future career plans in as much detail as possible. The M.A. is a professional degree, and applicants need to indicate why they are qualified to undertake this professional training and how they intend to use it in the future. PH.D. APPLICANTS The Ph.D. is a research-oriented degree that presupposes both the ability and the interest in undertaking sustained original research including publication, scholarly presentations, and teaching. Applicants to the Ph.D. program should outline their previous graduate studies with as much detail as possible. They should also describe their specific interests, including possible dissertation topics, collateral areas, and related research. To the extent possible, students should identify resources that might contribute to the success of their doctoral studies. In addition, they should justify the choice of Texas Tech University as the appropriate institution for their doctoral career. Finally, and most importantly, they should elaborate on their academic background and their abilities to conduct original in-depth research, and should describe their future professional plans and aspirations. Language Interview Applicants to our graduate program will be interviewed via Skype to establish an initial communication with the current graduate recruiters. The interview will cover a variety of topics (i.e. interest in our program and university, previous academic experience, etc.) in English and Spanish to determine language competency and suitability to our graduate program. This will also provide the applicant an opportunity to ask questions about our programs.

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FINANCIAL SUPPORT CMLL strives to offer financial support to promising graduate students enrolled in our programs via assistantships and instructorships. Support is often based on the typical academic year (fall-spring), and may include summer assignments (as long as CMLL opens enough undergraduate courses). Applications to be considered for financial support can be found on the respective graduate program pages. (Note: Enrollment in a CMLL graduate program is not an automatic guarantee of support.) When financial support is offered, it is usually in the form of employment in one of two position types: Teaching Assistant (TA) or Graduate Part-time Instructor (GPTI). A Teaching Assistant (TA) position is supportive in nature, both on the employment and professional development levels. Teaching Assistants typically provide support to a faculty member's instruction (completing a variety of duties), or may act as the leaders of discussion sections (which run in concert with large enrollment courses). Graduate students receive training, guidance, and mentoring on how to teach effectively in their discipline, manage a classroom, devise materials, and other important related tasks. A TA is not eligible to be the instructor of record for a course, and commonly has less than 18 graduate credit hours in the subject area being taught. A Graduate Part-time Instructor (GPTI) is usually an instructor of record, meaning that the individual is generally responsible for the teaching and care of his or her own class(es). GPTI's also receive training, guidance and further professional development. As opportunities allow, advanced Graduate students (i.e. Ph.D. students and ABDs) may have the opportunity to teach upper level courses (beyond the lower-level "two-year" language sequence). Funding Period for M.A. and Ph.D. Students According to university policy, M.A. students may expect two academic years of support as a TA/GPTI. Each student needs to keep track of his/her own progress by filling out the form “M.A. Candidate Policy on Degree Progress and Funding’’ (See Appendix), and provide a copy to the Graduate Advisor at the end of each semester. Ph.D. students may ordinarily expect four academic years of support as a GPTI after the M.A. degree or its equivalent. A fifth year of support may be granted, subject to satisfactory progress in the judgment of the graduate faculty, and with the approval of the Department Chair. In order to keep track of his/her own progress, each student will need to fill out the form “Ph.D. Candidate Policy on Degree Progress and Funding” (See Appendix), and provide a copy to the Graduate Advisor.



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Stipend/Salary Requirements All supported graduate students are expected to enroll full-time, and to maintain that enrollment successfully (i.e., 9 credit hours or more in long semesters, at least 3 hours or more during any summer session in which employed). There is also the expectation, unless carefully articulated in advance, that all course enrollment will be within CMLL. Dual or interdisciplinary programs, courses for a minor or the pursuit of a professional certification needs to be approved by the student's committee Chair and the Graduate Advisor. Most Teaching Assistants and Graduate Part-time Instructors work at half-time (i.e., 50%), although exceptions occasionally occur. Continuous support as a TA or GPTI is contingent upon several factors, including academic performance, academic progress and teaching performance (See the Instructor's Handbook to comply with the teaching expectations). Graduate Instructors selected to teach in our TTU Seville Center have all expenses paid (i.e. round-trip airfare, housing expenses and a stipend) during the summer session or the regular spring/fall semesters when they teach. Note: An offer of employment with the department is not a "contract" with the University, or any other binding agreement. See TTU OP 70.31, part 2. Stipend/Salary Ranges The initial stipend a supported graduate student can expect depends on several factors: the educational level of the person, the academic program concerned (M.A./Ph.D.), professional experience, and the type of position actually assigned (these are usually all interconnected). To obtain a copy of the most recent "Financial Planning Guide" for international graduate students, contact Carla Burrus ([email protected]). Fee & Tuition Waivers Students who have a 50% appointment in the department are eligible for certain fee waivers. CMLL Advisors can assist individual graduate students with forecasting how such fee and tuition waivers will reduce their cost. Please also see the Graduate School Financial Information Web page for updated information on tuition and related costs at TTU: www.depts.ttu.edu/gradschool/funding



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Health Insurance Texas Tech University requires non-immigrant students to maintain the health, evacuation, and repatriation insurance offered through the university. For more information, visit: www.depts.ttu.edu/international/isss/f1/healthinsinfo.php

Scholarships and Fellowships We encourage eligible students to take advantage of the excellent opportunities presented by the following scholarships and fellowships for graduate students: v General Fellowships/Scholarships (See Appendix or click here to see the list). Applicants do not have to be officially admitted to a TTU graduate program when applying for our fellowships. Additionally, applying to the Graduate School does not automatically qualify applicants for our fellowships. There is only one application for all student-initiated Graduate School Scholarships and Fellowships. Deadlines are in the spring of each year for awards for the upcoming fall and spring semesters. Average awards range from $3,000–$5,000/yr. The application process is student-initiated, and there is only one application for all General Fellowships. Application period opens mid-November; deadline is midJanuary. Awards are announced mid-March. Click here for the online application. v Scholarships and Financial Assistance for International Students. Texas Tech offers several scholarships for International Students such as: o Florence Terry Griswold Scholarship. One award for $2,500 for a woman who is a citizen of a Pan American country (other than the United States). Check deadlines with the Office of International Affairs. Click here. o Good Neighbor Scholarship Program (Number and amount of scholarships vary). Awards are based on academic merit. International students from countries in the Caribbean and North, Central, and South America are welcome to apply. Check deadlines with the Office of International Affairs. Click here. o Tuition Assistance for Students of Mexico (Assistance amount varies). For citizens or permanent residents of Mexico. Deadline is always ten days prior to the start of each semester. Click here. o Study Abroad Competitive Scholarship (SACS). All international students are eligible to apply for the Study Abroad Competitive Scholarship program. Applications are due by a designated deadline. For international student awardees, the SACS may provide a certain monetary award for an appropriate academic term or summer session. Every TTU student pays the SACS fee every academic term that he or she is enrolled at Texas Tech University, and therefore, is eligible to apply each term. Interested students can get more information here.



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v Gertrude Cross Suppe Spanish/Music Scholarship Endowment. This scholarship is for undergraduate or graduate students who combine serious interests in music and Spanish. This might be evidenced by majoring in one area and minoring in the other. Preference will be given to applicants who wish to work with the Gertrude C. Suppe Collection of Hispanic church music. The scholarship will be housed in, and maintained by, the Department of Classical and Modern Languages and Literatures. The scholarship will be awarded only in years where there are worthy applicants. For more information, click here. v The Grant-in-Aid Program. This program is for Texas Tech University graduate students who are in need of funds to successfully complete their research (thesis/dissertation or non-thesis based). Funds may only be used for expenses directly related to research (e.g., supplies, software, research-related training, etc.). Funds may not be used for tuition and fee purposes. It is anticipated that there will be two grant cycles during the academic year, one in the fall and one in the spring. The award range is expected to be $300-$500. Click here for details and the online application. v Doctoral Dissertation Completion Fellowship. These awards are designed to increase the completion rate of Ph.D. students and to enhance recruitment of new students. Recipients must be advanced to candidacy for the Ph.D. and expect to complete their dissertation during the year of their fellowship. Support will be available for up to 12 months to enable students to dedicate their time exclusively to dissertation research. The stipend level will be the equivalent of their current assistantship stipend, and it may be augmented from other sources. Per CMLL policy, applicants must have the approval of their main dissertation advisor prior to applying. Application opens December 1st; deadline is mid-February. Awardees are notified by early March. For the online application and further information, click here. v External Fellowship, Scholarships and Grants. External fellowships for graduate and postdoctoral studies are available from many organizations outside Texas Tech University, including state and federal agencies, private foundations, non-profit groups, and international organizations. A variety of support is offered, from one-time awards to multi-year support for living expenses, educational fees, conference travel and/or research for beginning to advanced graduate students and postdoctoral levels. In addition to helping fund your education, external grants and fellowships are a great academic honor and help distinguish your academic scholarship. The Office of Graduate and Postdoctoral Fellowships will help you find and apply for fellowship opportunities that meet your needs. Click here for details, and here for resources. Some examples of external funding are, but are not limited to:

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o Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad Program (DDRA). The DDRA Program provides grants to colleges and universities to fund individual doctoral students who conduct research in other countries, in modern foreign languages and area studies for periods of six to 12 months. Click here for details. o Harry Ransom Center. The Ransom Center encourages discovery, inspires creativity, and advances understanding of the humanities for a broad and diverse audience through the preservation and sharing of its extraordinary collections. Click here for details. o The John Carter Brown Library fellowship program was created to give scholars from this country and abroad an opportunity to pursue their work in proximity to a distinguished collection of primary sources. Approximately forty fellowships are awarded each year for periods of two to ten months. The fellowship competition is open to any qualified researcher, the main criteria for appointment being the merit and significance of the candidate’s proposal, the qualifications of the candidate, and the relevance of the project to the holdings of the Library. The fellowship selection committees look closely at the potential shown by the candidate for creative utilization of the Library’s resources. For more information, click here. Search for more external funding opportunities here.



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CONDITIONS OF EMPLOYMENT FOR TEACHING ASSISTANTS AND GRADUATE PART-TIME INSTRUCTORS EXPECTATIONS: As graduate instructors and teaching assistants you serve as role models for your students. CMLL encourages you to act in a professional manner in and outside the classroom. It is also expected that you will support the department, the faculty, and fellow graduate students by attending and helping to organize departmental functions such as lectures, workshops, conferences and cultural events. Such active participation enriches your intellectual life and professional preparation and contributes to the vital exchange of ideas within CMLL and the University as a whole. Note. All instructors who are non-native English speakers must comply with the International Teaching Assistant Workshop and Special Interviews and successfully pass their language assessment requirements in order to be qualified to teach for CMLL. GENERAL CONDITIONS: Deviation from the rules stipulated here constitutes a breach of contract and may result in termination. All Teaching Assistants/Instructors will: v Teach the class assigned by the Director of Lower-Level Spanish (DLLS) or Department Chair and follow the class schedule as specified in the syllabus. v Follow all guidelines and rules of the syllabus. v Attend all meetings called by the Director of Lower-Level Spanish and/or Department Chair. v Attend Orientation Week activities conducted at the beginning of each semester (usually during week before a semester begins). v Enroll in LING 5322: Theoretical and Research Foundations of Language Teaching, during the first fall semester of employment at CMLL, regardless of prior teaching or methodology experience elsewhere. v Keep at least 120 minutes office hours per week (including summer semester), post these hours on the Blackboard page and the respective announcement boards outside the instructor's office. Remember: Encourage your students to attend your office hours.



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v Keep office hours as posted, if office hours are changed, inform your supervisors, the coordination team or the DLLS. Communicate these changes to your students. v If sick, or otherwise unable to teach an assigned class, contact your substitute (available on Blackboard page: Instructor training) and the coordination team. Upon your return, fill in the absence form and take it to the Director of Lower-Level Spanish. v Follow any other rules or regulations set forth by the DLLS (in the Instructor Handbook), the Coordination Team, the CMLL Chair, and the Spanish Graduate Advisor. v Graduate Instructors must maintain a minimum of 9 credit hours of approved graduate courses for the entire duration of the term for which the assistantship is awarded. Any change of registration which a) causes the total number of hours to drop below this minimum, or b) has not been appropriately approved by the Graduate Advisor may result in an immediate revocation of the teaching assistantship. If you have difficulties with a student consult the Director of Lower-Level Spanish.



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TEACHING FOR THE SPANISH HERITAGE LANGUAGE PROGRAM Since the fall semester of 2014, CMLL has offered a series of courses specifically designed with the Spanish heritage language learner in mind. Spanish heritage language learners are students who grow up speaking Spanish (or perhaps just listening to it) at home but whose dominant language is clearly English. With this initiative, CMLL joins a growing number of departments across the country that recognize the different needs of the heritage speaker population as opposed to those of the more traditional second language learner population. The ultimate goal of our program is to provide a supportive and effective learning environment that not only considers the bilingual/bicultural background of our diverse student body but that also fosters and encourages its development. We hope to meet their specific needs by exploring topics related to their own cultural backgrounds and by offering exciting learning opportunities both inside and outside the classroom. Every Spring semester, we will select two students to shadow our classes for bilingual/heritage students during the following semester. After successfully shadowing our courses for a semester, each selected student will be considered to be ready to teach this class in future semesters. Selected instructors will be expected to: o shadow the current courses for at least 12 class periods; o attend weekly meetings; o play an active role in the preparation of teaching materials and exams as well as in grading a number of assignments; Students interested in this teaching opportunity must submit a one-page description of why they want to teach Spanish courses for heritage speakers and a copy of their CV before the semester starts. Email your application dossier to Dr. Diego Pascual. Applications will be evaluated by a committee using the following criteria (where applicable): 1. Quality of written proposal 2. Academic standing 3. Prior teaching experience



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DEPARTMENTAL TERMINATION POLICY CMLL is committed to providing reasonable expectations of continued support to our graduate instructors. CMLL also is committed to provide training and mentoring that will enable TAs and GPTIs to perform their duties in a satisfactory manner. Nevertheless, on occasion problems with TA/GPTI performance may be sufficiently severe that termination becomes necessary. 1) GROUNDS FOR TERMINATION MAY INCLUDE, BUT ARE NOT LIMITED TO: a) b) c) d) e) f) g) h) i) j) k) l) m)

Insufficient English proficiency. Failure to teach material. Failure to meet class. Failure to keep appropriate records. Failure to carry out TA/GPTI Supervisor's instructions. Arbitrary or capricious grading practices. Persistently low teaching evaluations or other evidence of not teaching to an acceptable standard. Failure to enroll in and complete LING 5322 or other pedagogy courses when required the first time they are offered after employment commences. Refusal to complete required courses or workshops. Failure to participate satisfactorily in training sessions. Sexual harassment. Other inappropriate conduct. For further examples, see TTU O.P. 70.31. Unsatisfactory progress towards the degree or performance as a graduate student.

Students are encouraged to take advantage of the mentoring, supervising, monitoring, and systematic pedagogical training opportunities as TAs and GPTIs. CMLL is committed to provide such mentoring, supervising, monitoring, and systematic pedagogical training including workshops and requiring enrollment in LING 5322 or other appropriate pedagogy courses that may be required.



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Master of Arts in Romance Languages, Spanish and Ph.D. Hispanic Literature Curriculum M.A. Thesis: 36 Hours (30 course hours + 6 thesis hours) M.A. Non-Thesis: 36 Hours of coursework Ph.D. 60 hours of course work (45 hours in the "major area" + 15 in an optional "minor area") Note: Hours earned at the M.A. level at a different institution are applicable and graduate students may transfer up to 21 hours of credit maximum, at the discretion of the Spanish Graduate Advisor. Texas Tech M.A. to Ph.D. students may count all hours earned at the M.A. level (B or better) except for the courses marked with an asterisk below (*).

Required Courses SPAN 5301: Writing for the Profession* SPAN 5352: Methods of Literary Criticism (Required for Spanish Ph.D. students, encouraged for all others) SPAN 5354: Hispanic Literary Concepts (for M.A. students with no prior Hispanic literature courses at the undergraduate level or another M.A. degree)* LING 5322: Theoretical and Research Foundations of Second Language Teaching (for all TAs/GPTIs. Encouraged for all others)* SPAN 53XX: Any Spanish Linguistics course Hispanic Literature Core Courses: Peninsular SPAN 5361: Medieval Literature SPAN 5362: Golden Age Literature SPAN 5364: Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Spanish Literature SPAN 5366: Twentieth- and Twenty-First-Century Spanish Prose SPAN 5368: Twentieth- and Twenty-First-Century Spanish Theater and Poetry Spanish American SPAN 5370: Colonial Spanish-American Literature SPAN 5374: Nineteenth-Century Spanish-American Literature SPAN 5375: Modernism SPAN 5376: Twentieth- and Twenty-First-Century Spanish-American Prose SPAN 5378: Twentieth- Twenty-First-Century Spanish-American Theatre and Poetry



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Other Courses SPAN 5345: History of the Spanish Language SPAN 5355: Seminar in Hispanic Literature (Latin American, Peninsular or Transatlantic) SPAN 5381: Hispanic Literature of the Southwest Mexican Literature (1821-1848) Mexican-American Literature (1849-present) ------------------------------------------------------------------------SPAN 6000 M.A. Thesis hours SPAN 7000 Independent Study (Seville) SPAN 8000 Dissertation Hours (ABD Students)

Master of Arts in Romance Languages, Spanish and Ph.D. in Spanish Linguistics Curriculum M.A. Thesis: 36 Hours (30 course hours + 6 thesis hours) M.A. Non-Thesis: 36 Hours of coursework Ph.D. 60 hours of course work (45 hours in the "major area" + 15 in an optional "minor area") Note: Hours earned at the M.A. level at a different institution are applicable and graduate students may transfer up to 21 hours of credit maximum. Texas Tech M.A. to Ph.D. students may count all hours earned at the M.A. level (B or better) except for the courses marked with an asterisk below (*).

Required Courses for the M.A. Degree LING 5322 —Theoretical and Research Foundations of Language Teaching (for all TAs/GPTIs. Encouraged for all others)* SPAN 5340 — Spanish Language & Linguistics (Intro) SPAN 5343 — Studies in Spanish as a L2 (Part 1&2) SPAN 53XX— One Spanish Literature course Required Courses for the Ph.D. Degree LING 5322 —Theoretical and Research Foundations of Language Teaching (for all TAs/GPTIs. Encouraged for all others)* SPAN 5343 (2) — Studies in Spanish as a L2 (Part 1&2) SPAN 53XX— One Spanish Literature course EPSY 5380 Quantitative Analysis EPSY 5382 Qualitative Analysis



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Spanish Linguistics Courses SPAN 5340 Spanish Language & Linguistics (Up to 2 courses) SPAN 5343 Studies in Spanish (Part 3) SPAN 5345 History of the Spanish Language SPAN 5382 Spanish in the U.S. SPAN 5383 Spanish in Contact with Other Languages SPAN 5384 Acquisition & Development of Skills SPAN 5385 Seminar in Hispanic Linguistics (Up to 3 courses) SPAN 5386 Seminar in Second Lang Acquisition (Up to 3 courses) ----------------------------------------------------- SPAN 6000 M.A. Thesis hours SPAN 7000 Independent Study (Seville) SPAN 8000 Dissertation Hours (ABD Students)

PORTUGUESE PROGRAM

The Luso-Brazilian languages, literatures and cultures share many similarities with those of Spanish America. Graduate students in Spanish should consider minoring in Portuguese at the M.A. or the Ph.D. levels considering the many options this minor would allow them in a competitive job market. In addition, coursework in Portuguese will enhance students' understanding and appreciation of all Latin America and the Iberian Peninsula. At the M.A. level, a minor in Portuguese is obtained by taking 6 hours of coursework (PORT 5341 and PORT 5342). If Portuguese is an M.A. exam area, 9 hours of coursework are required.

Portuguese Minor at the M.A. and Ph.D. Levels Curriculum M.A. Minor: 6-9 Hours of coursework Ph.D. Minor: 15-18 Hours of coursework PORT 5341: Intensive Portuguese for Graduate Students I PORT 5342: Intensive Portuguese for Graduate Students II PORT 5355: Readings in Luso-Brazilian Literature: Advanced topics in Luso-Brazilian literatures. May be repeated up to 12 credit hours with different content. PORT 7000: Research. May be repeated up to 6 credit hours with different content.



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The Romance Languages M.A. in Spanish Texas Tech University offers the Romance Language M.A. in Spanish with two tracks: Hispanic Literature and Spanish Linguistics. Students are encouraged to minor in Portuguese by taking two graduate level courses in two consecutive semesters. Financial assistance is provided by the CMLL department via assistantships and instructorships to promising graduate students enrolled in our programs. Support is often based on the typical academic year (fall-spring), and may include summer assignments as long as students remain in good standing. Degree Description The Romance Language M.A. in Spanish is offered in two tracks: Hispanic Literature and Spanish Linguistics. The M.A. is offered under Option I: Thesis, and Option II: Coursework/ Non-Thesis. The Thesis option requires 30 hours of coursework + 6 thesis hours, the Master's examinations (in two areas) and a thesis. The Coursework Option requires 36 hours of coursework and the Master's examinations (in three areas). All coursework counted toward the M.A. credit requirements must be in courses approved by the Department at the 5000-level or above. 1. Hispanic Literature Track (30-36 hours) 18-21 hours must come from Spanish American and Peninsular Spanish courses (See "Degree Plan Forms") from different time periods. Required courses: LING 5322 —Theoretical and Research Foundations of Second Language Teaching, for all current and prospect TAs/ GPTIs (Fall). SPAN 5301 —Writing for the Profession. SPAN 5354 —Hispanic Literary Concepts (for incoming M.A. students with no prior Spanish literature courses at the undergraduate level, and at the discretion of the Graduate Studies Director). SPAN 53XX—One Spanish Linguistics course Other areas: 3-6 hours of elective courses such as: SPAN 5345: History of the Spanish Language SPAN 5381: Hispanic Literature of the Southwest/Mexican Literature (1821-1848)/ Mexican-American Literature (1821-1848) SPAN 5355: Seminar in Hispanic Literature (1 course max.) ------------------------------------------------------------------SPAN 6000: M.A. Research (for Thesis Option only) SPAN 7000: Independent Study (Seville)



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2. Spanish Linguistics Track (30-36 hours) 18-21 hours must come from the core courses designated as Spanish Linguistics and/or Second Language Acquisition sections (See "Degree Plan Forms"). Required courses: LING 5322 —Theoretical and Research Foundations of Language Teaching (for all TAs/GPTIs. Encouraged for all others)* SPAN 5340 — Spanish Language & Linguistics (Intro) SPAN 5343 — Studies in Spanish as a L2 (Part 1&2) SPAN 53XX— One Spanish Literature course Other courses: SPAN 6000 MA Thesis (Up to 6 credits) SPAN 7000 Independent Study (Seville) 3. Minor A Minor at the M.A. is optional. Any minor consists of 6 hours of coursework as part of the 30-36 hours for the degree. Should the student choose to be evaluated in the minor area in the M.A. exams; he/she may take up to 9 hours of coursework. A student can choose a minor in consultation with the Graduate Studies Director or his/her committee of studies' chair. Recommended minors: • • • • • • • •



Portuguese Applied Linguistics Comparative Literature Medieval and Renaissance Studies Women's Studies Classics, Greek or Latin English as a Second Language German, French or Russian

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Language Requirements for the M.A. Degree All M.A. candidates must possess reading knowledge of a third language other than English or Spanish. This requirement can be met in one of the following ways: a. Students may fulfill the reading knowledge requirement by passing with a grade of C or better the second course of the sophomore sequence of the required language. Intensive language courses at the graduate level are usually offered in the summer sessions. Students that complete Summer I and Summer II of a particular language at the graduate level can waive this requirement. b. Passing a standardized examination. Consult with the advisor in the Department of Classical and Modern Languages and Literatures for proficiency exams furnished by the department or the Educational Testing Service. Arrangements for these examinations should be made in the applicable unit. The CMLL faculty in charge will provide test results using a "Foreign Language Requirement for the M.A. Degree Form" (See Appendix). Arrangements for testing for other foreign languages will be approved by the graduate dean.

DEGREE PLANS FOR THE M.A. STUDENT After admission to a degree program, every applicant for the Master's degree is required to complete and submit one copy of a degree plan form to the Graduate School for approval before the second semester of enrollment in the program. See the Graduate School form in the Appendix. To help students keep track of the requirements of our program and the general university requirements, please follow the guidelines of the form applicable to your degree in the following pages. Using this form may answer many questions before visiting with the current Graduate Advisor.



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M.A. IN LITERATURE



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M.A. IN LINGUISTICS



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THE M.A. THESIS OPTION M.A. candidates in Spanish have the option of writing a Master’s thesis in lieu of 6 hours of graduate coursework. Students taking the thesis option will still take two areas of the Master’s examinations. There are both pros and cons to writing a M.A. thesis: for some students, the additional coursework is vital, while for others, the ideas developed in a Master’s thesis may serve as a nucleus for a doctoral dissertation or may have practical applications. Students interested in pursuing the thesis option should consult the Spanish Graduate Advisor by the end of their second semester in their M.A. program. All M.A. theses in literature shall use the style sheet of the Modern Language Association of America (MLA). All M.A. theses in linguistics shall use the style sheet of the Linguistic Society of America (LSA), as exemplified in its journal Language. Consult the Texas Tech Graduate School website for additional information on thesis preparation and format. Students doing a thesis must turn in to the Graduate Advisor a Thesis Declaration form one month into the students third semester (See "Thesis Declaration Form" below). Once a student has registered for thesis hours (SPAN 6000) they must continue to take thesis hours every semester (including one summer session) until they have completed the thesis and turned it in to the Office of Graduate Studies.



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CMLL — SPANISH PROGRAM M.A. THESIS DECLARATION FORM The Thesis Declaration from should be completed the beginning of the third semester of study. Please complete the following form and attach a copy of your thesis proposal and return to the Graduate Advisor and your thesis committee Chair. Student’s Name: __________________________________________________________ Proposed title of thesis: _____________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ Date approved: ___________________________________________________________ Committee Members/ Print names

Committee Signatures

______________________________ Committee Chair

______________________________ Committee Chair

______________________________

______________________________

______________________________

______________________________

Comments:



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THE M.A. EXAMS The Master’s examination is designed to test the students’ ability to demonstrate extensive knowledge of the assigned texts, apply critical skills in the analysis of those texts and organize and write coherent, substantial essays in Spanish. M.A. students must take courses in as many areas of specialization as possible before choosing their exam areas. For literature students, the areas of specialization are: 1. Medieval Literature 2. Golden Age Spanish Literature 3. 18th & 19th-Century Peninsular Literature 4. 20th & 21st-Century Peninsular Literatures 5. Colonial Literature 6. 19th-Century Spanish American Literature 7. Spanish American Modernism and early 20th-Century Literature 8. 20th & 21st-Century Spanish American Literature 9. Chicano/US Latino Literature/ Portuguese M.A. Thesis students select two exam areas: one from the Peninsular Group, and one from the Spanish American Group, and complete the Thesis project. Non-M.A. Thesis students select three exam areas: one from the Peninsular Group, one from the Spanish American Group and one from another area (See "Other areas" in the curriculum above). For linguistics students, the exam areas are: 1. Second Language Acquisition (Required for all M.A. Students) + one additional area from the list below for Thesis Option, or two additional areas from the list below for Non-Thesis Option: 2. Applied Linguistics & SLA 3. Sociolinguistics and Dialectology 4. History of the Spanish Language 5. Phonetics and Phonology 6. Morphology and Syntax The Thesis Option After successfully completing 18 hours of coursework, the student must form his/her thesis committee (usually by the end of the second semester). A thesis committee consists of three members, including the committee chair, who will be the student’s major supervising professor. The chair must be a tenured or tenure-track member of the Spanish and Portuguese Division. The student, in consultation with the committee chair, selects the remaining committee members and chooses a tentative topic for the Master's thesis. The thesis topic may be chosen from any of the fields in literature or linguistics. The M.A. thesis proposal must be submitted by the end of the third semester to the committee members (See M.A. Thesis

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proposal guidelines below). After completing the required coursework, degree candidates must take two comprehensive exams and complete a Master’s thesis. Literature students will select the two exam areas from number 1-9 above. For Linguistic students, the SLA area (1) is required for the M.A. degree. In addition, thesis students must select an additional area from numbers 2-5 above. The Non-Thesis Option After completing 18 hours of coursework, the student must select the three areas in which he/she will be tested. He/she will also select three graduate faculty members who will form his/her M.A. exams committee, one of which will be the committee chair. Each committee member will create his/her portion of the comprehensive exam. For Literature students, the three exams will include: One Peninsular literature area, one Spanish American Literature area and a third area from numbers 1-9 of the literature areas of specialization listed above. The third area could also be a minor in a third language (i.e. Portuguese, French, etc.) or a Spanish linguistics area (in which case it would be the SLA area). For Linguistic students, the SLA area (1) is required for the M.A. degree. In addition, non-thesis students must select two additional Linguistics areas from numbers 2-5 above. Scheduling of the M.A. Exams Exams will ordinarily be given during the fourth semester of the student's M.A. courses. Financial support (four semesters) is dependent on timely completion of the degree. Exams must not be postponed more than one semester beyond the fourth. Part-time students must complete the exams by the semester following the last course that counts toward the degree. Postponements will be granted only for unusual and extenuating circumstances. The student must inform the Graduate advisor in writing, 8-10 weeks in advance of the day set for the exam of his/her intention to take the M.A. exams, the names of the three committee members and the areas in which he/she will be examined and the area in which he/she will write the thesis (for Thesis Option students). All M.A. students must fill out the form “Letter of Intent to take the M.A. Exams’’ from our graduate academic assistant and have it signed by the Graduate Advisor (See Appendix). Exams will be given three times yearly: • • •

The second Monday in October (December graduation) The first Monday after spring break (May graduation), and The first Monday in June (August graduation).

Exact dates will be determined at the beginning of each semester according to the current academic calendar. Any exceptions will require special permission from the graduate faculty.



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Logistics For Thesis Option students, the written portion of the two exams will be administered over a six-hour period (three hours per exam) during the scheduled date at the CMLL Language Laboratory. The thesis defense and M.A. exam will be given a few days following the written exams (no later than two weeks) at the discretion of the student's committee prior to the deadline set by the graduate school. The committee will meet then with the M.A. candidate, who will defend his/her thesis and will answer questions about the thesis and the content of the exams. It will be desirable that the student establishes connections between his/her thesis topic and critical approaches and the other areas in which he/she is to be examined. For Non-Thesis Option students, the written portion of the three exams will be administered over a nine-hour period (three hours per exam) during the scheduled dates. The student will take two exams on the first day (Exam 1: morning, and Exam 2: afternoon), and one exam on the second day (Exam 3: either morning or afternoon) during the Language Laboratory schedule. Oral Exam After grading the written exams, the committee will decide if: 1) The exam is passed with no oral exam, or 2) The exam needs to be defended orally. If the oral exam is deemed necessary, the oral exam must be scheduled at the discretion of the committee as soon as possible following the written exam, but no later than ten class days. In either case, the committee chairperson will be responsible for directing the thesis (for the Thesis Option), organizing and administering the exam, and reporting the results to the Graduate Dean, the student, and the Spanish Graduate Advisor. The M.A. candidate must pass both written and oral exams, and for the Thesis Option, the thesis must be approved in order for the student to earn the M.A. degree. If one area is not approved, the student will have to re-take that area after a period of at least four months and no later than twelve months. If the student fails two or more areas, the student will have to be re-examined in all three areas after a period of at least four months and no later than twelve months. The chair will notify the Dean of the Graduate School using the M.A. Comprehensive Exam Report from their website (See Appendix). If the student does not pass all three areas in the second examination, no degree will be granted.



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THE M.A. EXAM COMMITTEE FORM 1. The Committee should be named by the end of the first year of M.A. Program. 2. Select a chair of the committee (chair is student's major supervising professor) 3. A Committee consists of at least 3 members, including chair.

Student: ________________________________ R#_________________________ (printed)

________________________________ Date: _________________________ (signature)

Circle one: Thesis / Non-Thesis Chair: Professor ______________________________ Date: ___________________ (printed)

_______________________________ (signature)

Member: Professor _____________________________ Date: ___________________ (printed)

_____________________________ (signature)

Member: Professor _____________________________ Date: ___________________ (printed)

_____________________________ (signature)

Major/ Areas of Examination : ______________________________________________ Minor: _________________________________________________________________ Language Requirement: ____________________________________________________



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M.A. THESIS PROPOSAL GUIDELINES I. COVER SHEET. TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF CLASSICAL AND MODERN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES — SPANISH PROGRAM M.A. THESIS PROPOSAL COVER SHEET Please complete the following form and attach a copy of your proposal and return to your thesis committee. Student’s Name: __________________________________________________________ Date M.A. exams: _________________________________________________________ Date M.A. Thesis proposal due: ______________________________________________ Proposed title of thesis: ________________________________________________ Date approved: ___________________________________________________________ Committee Members

Committee Signatures

Print names

_____________________________

________________________

_____________________________

________________________

_____________________________

________________________

_____________________________

________________________

Committee Chair

Committee Chair

Comments: ______________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________



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II. The PROPOSAL text should include, in the following order: (a) Full Working Title (b) Abstract or thesis statement: The abstract is limited to 350 words in length, on the central problem(s) and major aims of the study. What preliminary results have been found? (c) Significance: What contributions will the thesis make to the particular area of study and to Hispanic studies in general? What are the broader implications of this project for the Humanities in general? (d) Background: How is your project unique? Include a concise review of the most important literature on the proposed topic(s), method(s), and theoretical approaches of the study. (e) Data/ Sources: An overview of the primary and secondary sources to be investigated. Indicate what data have been collected, what sources consulted, and what field contacts made to date (if appropriate). (f) Methodology/ Theory: What methods of analysis will be employed? What working hypotheses will inform these analyses? (g) Pilot study: where applicable, include the results of a pilot study to illustrate how the analysis will be conducted and what the possible results are (For Linguistics Students) (h) Plan: Outline the probable chapters with a brief notion of what is to be included in each. (i) Timetable: Design a 6 to 12-month feasibility projection indicating the progress of your research and writing. How can this project be realistically completed in the time allotted? III. SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY For the Literature concentration: A list of published sources that are most pertinent to the proposed study (archival, manuscript, and field sources will be described under “Data” above). The entries should be divided into topic areas, and presented in a form consistent with the MLA citation style. For the Linguistics concentration: A list of all sources cited in the paper. This should be a comprehensive review of the literature in the field. They should be presented in a form consistent with APA citation style.



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M.A. READING LIST: HISPANIC LITERATURE PENINSULAR SPANISH LITERATURE Medieval Poema del Cid Juan Ruiz: Libro de buen amor Fernando de Rojas: La Celestina Gonzalo de Berceo: Milagros de nuestra señora —y siguientes cuentos: "El ladrón devoto," "La abadesa encinta," and "El clérigo embriagado" Don Juan Manuel: El conde Lucanor (selecciones) Jorge Manrique, "Coplas por la muerte de su padre" Romances: Ciclo de don Rodrigo, último rey godo: "El reino perdido: 'Los huestes de don Rodrigo / desmayaban y huían'" Ciclo del Cid: "Cabalga Diego Laínez," "--Morir vos queredes, padre," and "En Santa Gadea de Burgos", "Romance del Cid y del juramento que tomó al Rey don Alonso", "Romance de doña Urraca" Del infante Arnaldos: "¡Quién hubiera tal ventura" Del Prisionero: "Que no por mayo era por mayo" De Abenámar: "--¡Abenámar, Abenámar, / moro de la morería" De una morilla: "Yo me era mora Moraima, / morilla de un bel catar" De la linda Alba: "--¡Ay cuán linda que eres, Alba" De la linda Melisenda: "Todas las gentes dormían" "Fontefrida, Fontefrida, / Fontefrida y con amor" Arcipreste de Talavera: El Corbacho Teresa de Cartagena: Arboleda de los enfermos and Admiracion operum dei Diego de San Pedro: Cárcel de amor Alfonso el Sabio: selecciones de la Primera crónica general (Estoria de España), Siete partidas, and Cantigas de Santa Maria See Appendix For an updated list of references, consult with the area expert. Golden Age Lazarillo de Tormes Miguel de Cervantes: Don Quijote de la Mancha Mateo Aleman: Guzman de Alfarache Lope de Vega: Fuenteovejuna Ana Caro: Valor, agravio y mujer Tirso de Molina: El burlador de Sevilla Calderón de la Barca: La vida es sueño



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Golden Age Poetry: Santa Teresa de Jesús, glosa: "Vivo sin vivir en mí". Garcilaso de la Vega, sonnets X, XI, XXIII ("¡Oh dulces prendas...," "Hermosas ninfas que...," "En tanto que de rosa y azucena"); Egloga I and Egloga III. Fray Luis de León, Odas I, III, VIII ("Vida retirada," "A Francisco Salinas," and "Noche serena"). Fernando de Herrera, "Canción en alabanza de la divina majestad por la victoria del Señor Don Juan," and Soneto XXXVIII ("Serena Luz..."). San Juan de la Cruz, Canciones I, II, and III ("Cántico espiritual," "La noche oscura," and "Llama de amor viva"). Luis de Góngora y Argote, Sonetos CLXV and CLXVI, ("Ilustre y hermosísima María..." and "Mientras por competir con tu cabello"); romancillo XLIX ("La más bella niña"); "Fábula de Polifemo y Galatea". Lope de Vega, romances: "Hortelano era Belardo," "A mis soledades voy"; sonnets LXII, CLXXXVIII, XIV ("Pasando el mar el engañoso toro," "Suelta mi manso, mayoral extraño," and "Pastor que con tus silbos amorosos"). Francisco de Quevedo y Villegas, Sonetos 2, 29, 471, 522 ("'¡Ah de la vida!'...¿Nadie me responde?" "Miré los muros de la patria mía," "Cerrar podrá mis ojos...," and "A un hombre de gran nariz"). Leonor de la Cueva y Silva: Sonetos II and VIII ("Quiéroos pintar el miserable estado," "Ni sé si muero ni si tengo vida"); octava XVII ("Cual sale el alba aljófares feriendo") See Apprendix For an updated list of references, consult with the area expert. 18th and 19th Century Padre Feijoo, “Voz del pueblo” y “Defensa de las mujeres” del Teatro Crítico Cadalso, Cartas marruecas (Introducción, 3, 4, 7, 21, 34, 41, 69, 70). L. F. de Moratín, El sí de las niñas or La comedia nueva o El café Selecciones de Larra ("El castellano viejo", "Vuelva Ud. mañana", "La Nochebuena de 1836", "El día de difuntos de 1836") Duque de Rivas, Don Alvaro o la fuerza del sino Zorrilla, Don Juan Tenorio Juan Valera, Pepita Jiménez Leopoldo Alas "Clarín": • Su único hijo • “Doña Berta”, “Adiós, Cordera” or “Pipá”, or La Regenta* Emilia Pardo Bazán: • La cuestión palpitante (Selections) • Los pazos de Ulloa, La madre naturaleza or Insolación (select TWO) Benito Pérez Galdós: • Fortunata y Jacinta or "La novela en el tranvía" • La de Bringas • Doña Perfecta or another novel from the early novels or one Episodio Nacional



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Poetry: Gaspar Melchor de Jovellanos. "Carta de Jovellanos a su hermano Francisco de Paula, dedicándole sus poesías" Tomás de Iriarte. "El burro flautista" Juan Meldez Valdés, “De la paloma de Filis” Nicolás Alvarez Cienfuegos, "Mi paseo solitario de primavera" José de Espronceda, "Canción del pirata", "El canto del cosaco", "A Jarifa en una orgía" Rosalía de Castro, En las orillas del Sar (XXIX, L: II, LVI: I, II) Gustavo Adolfo Bécquer, Rimas y Leyendas Leyendas: "El rayo de luna," "Los ojos verdes," and "La promesa" Rimas: Roman numerals refer to the 187a edition of Rimas and most subsequent editions; Arabic numerals to the order given the "Rimas" as included in Libro de los gorriones) IV (39), "No digáis que agotado su tesoro..." XVII (50), "Hoy la tierra y los cielos me sonríen..." XXI (21), "¿Qué es poesía" XLI (26), "Tú eras el huracán y yo..." LII (35), "Olas gigantes que os rompéis bramando..." LIII (38), "Volverán la oscuras golondrinas..." LVI (20), "Hoy como ayer, mañana como hoy..." LXVI (67), "¿De dónde vengo"...El más horrible..." LXVIII (61), "No sé lo que he soñado..." LXXIII (71), "Cerraron sus ojos..." *For your M.A. exam, you must read either La Regenta or Fortunata y Jacinta. If you read La Regenta, then you may read Galdós’ short story “La novela en el tranvía” instead of Fortunata y Jacinta, and vice-versa, if you read Fortunata then you may choose one of Clarín’s short stories instead of La Regenta. See Appendix For an updated list of references, consult with the area expert. 20th-21st Century Prose Atxaga, Bernardo. Obabakoak (1988): “Infancias” Unamuno: Niebla, San Manuel Bueno or Tres novelas ejemplares Baroja: El árbol de la ciencia o Camino de perfección. C.J. Cela: La familia de Pascual Duarte or La colmena Miguel Delibes: El camino or any other novel Buero Vallejo: Historia de una escalera or Concierto de San Ovidio Ana María Matute: Fiesta al noroeste or Primera memoria Martín-Santos, Luis. Tiempo de silencio. Belén Gopegui: Tocarnos la cara Javier Marías: El hombre sentimental Rodoreda, Mercè. La plaza del Diamante. Rosa Chacel, Carmen Conde, or Carmen Martín Gaite (novel approved by committee)



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Theater Benavente, Jacinto. Los intereses creados. Buero Vallejo, Antonio. Historia de una escalera. García Lorca, Federico. Bodas de sangre. Pedrero, Paloma. Resguardo personal. Romero, Concha. ¿Tengo razón o no? Sastre, Alfonso. Escuadra hacia la muerte. Poetry selections Juan Ramón Jimenez. Poemas agrestes: "El viaje definitivo", "Intelijencia dame el nombre exacto..." Rafael Alberti. Marinero en tierra: 1, 2, "Elegía del niño marinero"; Sobre los ángeles: "Los ángeles colegiales" Jorge Guillén. "Más allá" IV, "Perfección", "Primavera delgada". Luis Cernuda. "Diré como nacisteis", "No decía palabras", "Peregrino" Blas de Otero. "Aquí tenéis en canto y alma", "Crecida", "Un relámpago apenas" José Hierro. "Marzo", "Los claustros", "El niño" María Victoria Atencia. "Sazón", "Marta y María" Ana Rossetti. "Calvin Klein. Underdrawers", "Diotima a su muy aplicado discípulo" Fuertes, Gloria. “Nací para poeta o para muerto”, “Ni tiro, ni veneno, ni navaja...”, “Poeta de guardia” y “Sale caro ser Poeta”. Hernández, Miguel. Viento del pueblo: “El niño yuntero,” “Canción del esposo soldado” For an updated list of references, consult with the area expert. LATIN AMERICAN LITERATURE Colonial Spanish America Periodo precolombino Popol Vuh (Eds. Mercedes de la Garza, Miguel León-Portilla. Trad. Adrián Recinos. Caracas: Biblioteca Ayacucho, 1980): Introducción pp. 3-9, Preámbulo, Primera parte (Caps. I-IX), Segunda parte (Caps. I- XIV), Tercera parte (Caps. I-V). Ritos y tradiciones de Huarochirí. Ed. Gerald Taylor. Editorial Instituto Francés de Estudios Peruanos. Selection: Chapters 1-9. Periodo colonial Cristóbal Colón, Diario del primer viaje y su testamento. 1492-93 "Carta de Colón a Luis de Santangel," 1493 [www.elaleph.com] Hernán Cortés, “Segunda carta de relación,” 1520. Alvar Nuñez Cabeza de Vaca, Naufragios, 1542. Alonso de Ercilla, La araucana, 1554: Parte I, (1569). Prólogo, Cantos I, II y X; Parte II, (1578). "Al le(c)tor", Cantos XVI, XX, XXI, XXVII y XXVIII; Parte III, (1589). Cantos XXXIV y XXXVII. 37



Bernal Díaz del Castillo, Historia verdadera de la conquista de la Nueva España, 1576 (Edición recomendada de Alberto Yañez Rivas, ed. Madrid: Castalia Didáctica): Prólogo y Caps. XIX al LXIII, LXIV- XCII, XCIII- CLVI. Bartolomé de las Casas, Brevísima relación de la destrucción de las Indias, 1552. —. Historia de las Indias (1527 - 1559 circulando en forma manuscrita) Prólogo, Libro primero: Capítulos V, XL, XLI y XLIV; Libro tercero: Capítulos CXXV, CXXVI y CXXVII. Bernardino de Sahagún, Historia general de las cosas de la Nueva España, ca. 1570: Prólogo, Introducción, Libro XII. Bernardo de Balbuena. La grandeza mexicana, 1604: Introducción; Capítulo I: "De la famosa México el asiento"; Capítulo V: "Regalos, ocasiones de contento"; Capítulo VI: "Primavera inmortal y sus indicios"; Capítulo VII: "Gobierno ilustre" Gaspar Pérez de Villagrá, Historia de la Nueva México, 1610 (ed. Encinias, Rodríguez & Sánchez, UNM Press, 1992): Cantos 1-6, 12-24, 27-30, 32-34. Inca Garcilaso de la Vega, Comentarios reales de los Incas, 1609 (ed. Miró Quesada, Biblioteca Ayacucho): Proemio; Libro primero: I-VI, VIII-X, XIV-XV; Libro segundo: I-II, VII-IX, XIII, XXI, XXVII; Libro tercero: XI, XIII; Libro cuarto: IVIII, IX; Libro quinto: XII, XXI; Libro sexto: VII-VIII, XXIV, XXXVI; Libro séptimo: IV, VIII, XIV; Libro nono: I, II, XIV, XXXI. Felipe Guaman Poma de Ayala, Nueva corónica y buen gobierno, 1615 (ed. Franklin Pease, Biblioteca Ayacucho): Folios: 1-3, 5-7, 8-10, 11, 15-18, 22-25, 42-59, 80-82, 120-21, 182[184], 264[266]-265[267], 298[300]-299[301], 302[304]-303[305], 307[309], 309[311], 312[314], 351[353], 358[360]-359[361], 360[362]-361[363], 364[366]365[367], 366[368]-367[369], 370[372]-372[374], 376[378], 384[386]-385[387], 391[393], 454[456]-455[457], 504[508]-505[509], 521[526], 525[529]-526[540], 565[579], 574[588], 575[589], 590[604], 609[623]-610[624], 631[645]-632[646], 635[649]-636[650], 703[717], 704[718]-705[719]-710[719], 960[974]-962[976]. Catalina de Erauso, Vida y sucesos de la Monja Alférez, 1625. Sigüenza y Góngora, Los infortunios de Alonso Ramírez, 1690 o Alboroto y motín, 1692. Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, “Respuesta de la poetisa a la muy ilustre Sor Filotea de la Cruz,” 1691. —. Romance: “Finjamos que soy feliz,” redondilla: “Hombres necios que acusáis”; sonetos: “Este que ves, engaño colorido,” “En perseguirme, Mundo, ¿qué interesas?” “Detente sombra de mi bien esquivo,” “Que no me quiera Fabio, al verse amado,” “Feliciano me adora y le aborrezco,” “Al que ingrato me deja, busco amante”, “Respondiendo a un caballero”. Juan del Valle y Caviedes, Diente del parnaso, 1693: “Para ser caballero”; “Lo que son riquezas del Perú”; “Coloquio que tuvo con la muerte un médico, estando enfermo de riesgo”; "Respuesta de la muerte al médico" y "Décimas"; "Habiendo enfermado el autor de tercianas..."; "Dando los años a un viejo"; “A una vieja del Cuzco”; "Privilegios del pobre"; "Para ser caballero"; "Para labrarse fortuna en los palacios"; "A una fea"; "Define la vida de los hombres"; "A una dama en un baño"; "Carta que escribió el autor a la monja de México..." Terralla y Landa, Esteban. Lima por dentro y fuera. Alonso Carrió de la Vandera, Lazarillo de ciegos caminantes, 1773: “Prólogo y dedicatoria a los contenidos en él”; “Buenos Aires: descripción de la ciudad”; “El Cuzco, descripción de la ciudad”; “Acusaciones a los españoles. Los repartimientos de indios”; “El corregidor y el indio”; “El nombre de Concolorcorvo”; “El idioma castellano y el Quechua”; “Los negros, cantos, bailes y

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músicas”; “Comparación entre el imperio peruano y mexicano." "Anécdota de las cuatro PPPP de Lima. Fin” Terralla y Landa, Esteban. Lima por dentro y fuera, ca.1790. For an updated list of references, consult with the area expert. 19th Century Spanish American Literature Simón Bolívar, “Carta de Jamaica” y “Discurso ante el Congreso de Angostura” Andrés Bello, “La agricultura de la zona tórrida” Gertrudis G. de Avellaneda, Sab (Editorial Cátedra) Esteban Echeverría, “El matadero” Domingo F. Sarmiento, Facundo Ignacio Altamirano, El Zarco Jorge Isaacs, María Ricardo Palma, Tradiciones peruanas (Editorial Cátedra) José Hernández, Martín Fierro Juan León Mera, Cumandá Clorinda Matto de Turner, Aves sin nido Reference Books: Sommer, Doris. Foundational Fictions. The National Romances of Latin America. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1991. Pérez, Alberto Julián . Los dilemas políticos de la cultura letrada. Buenos Aires: Corregidor, 2002. Luis Iñigo Madrigal, coordinador. Historia de la Literatura Hispanoamericana. Tomo 2. Del neoclasicismo al modernismo. Madrid: Cátedra, 1987. For an updated list of references, consult with the area expert. Latin American: Modernism-c. 1950 Essay: José Enrique Rodó: Ariel. José Carlos Mariátegui, Siete ensayos de interpretación de la realidad peruana. Narrative: Mariano Azuela, Los de abajo. Teresa de la Parra, Memorias de Mamá Blanca. Rómulo Gallegos, Doña Bárbara, o Ricardo Güiraldes, Don Segundo Sombra. María Luisa Bombal, La última niebla. Jorge Luis Borges, Ficciones. Jorge Icaza, Huasipungo. Ernesto Sábato, El túnel. Miguel Ángel Asturias, El Señor Presidente. Poetry: Selections from Jiménez, José O. Antología crítica de la poesía modernista hispanoamericana, Madrid: Hiperión, 1985.

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José Martí, "Musa traviesa, " Poética, " "Yo soy un hombre sincero". Manuel Gutiérrez Nájera, "La duquesa Job," "De blanco," "Non omnis moriar". Rubén Darío, "Era un aire suave," "Yo soy aquel que ayer nomás decía," "A Roosevelt". Julio Herrera y Reissig: "La iglesia," "Epitalamio ancestral," "El abrazo pitagórico". Delmira Agustini, "Lo inefable," "La musa," "El vampiro". Selections from Jiménez, José O. Antología de la poesía hispanoamericana contemporánea. Madrid: Hiperión, 1971. Vicente Huidobro, "Arte poética, " "Marino," "La raíz de la voz". César Vallejo, "Los heraldos negros," Trilce VI, "Considerando en frío, imparcialmente...", “Intensidad y altura”. Pablo Neruda, "Sólo la muerte," "Walking around," "La verdad". Gabriela Mistral, "Los sonetos de la muerte," "Dios lo quiere," "Puertas". Selections from Alfonsina Storni, Poesías "Tú me quieres blanca," "La caricia perdida,". "Ecuación". Drama: Florencio Sánchez, Barranca abajo o La gringa. Alejandro Tapia, La cuarterona. Virgilio Piñera, Electra Garrigó. Xavier Villaurrutia, Invitación a la muerte. René Márquez, La carreta. Rodolfo Usigli, El gesticulador. Reference Books: Cathy Jrade, Modernismo Modernity and the Development of Spanish American Literature. Jean Franco, An Introduction to Spanish American Literature. Ed. Cátedra, Trinidad Barrera, editor, Historia de la literatura Hispanoamericana vol. III, Siglo XX. Alberto Julián Pérez, Revolución poética y modernidad periférica, Corregidor, 2009. For an updated list of references, consult with the area expert. Latin American: c. 1950-Present Narrative: Carlos Fuentes: La muerte de Artemio Cruz. Alejo Carpentier: Los pasos perdidos o El reino de este mundo. Juan Rulfo: Pedro Páramo. José María Arguedas, Los ríos profundos. Julio Cortázar: Rayuela, “Axolotl”, “Las babas del diablo”, “La noche boca arriba”, “Continuidad de los parques”. Gabriel García Márquez: Cien años de soledad o El otoño del patriarca. Cristina Peri Rossi: La nave de los locos. Manuel Puig: El beso de la mujer araña. Elena Poniatowska: Hasta no verte, Jesús mío. Guillermo Cabrera Infante: Tres tristes tigres. Leonardo Padura Fuentes, una de las novelas de la serie de Mario Conde o La novela de mi vida. Arturo Uslar Pietri, Las lanzas coloradas o La visita en el tiempo. Mario Vargas Llosa: La casa verde o La ciudad y los perros. Juan José Saer: El entenado.

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Ricardo Piglia: Respiración artificial. Fernando Vallejo: La virgen de los sicarios. Roberto Bolaño: Estrella distante. Mario Bellatín: Salón de belleza. Drama: José Triana: La noche de los asesinos. Egon Wolff, Flores de papel. Emilio Carballido, Yo también hablo de la rosa. Roberto Ramos-Perea: Malasangre. Roberto Cossa: La nona. José Díaz: El cepillo de dientes. Griselda Gambaro, Los siameses. Myrna Casas: El gran circo eucraniano o Cristal roto en el tiempo. Poetry: Nicolás Guillén: "Llegada," "La muralla," “La ballada de los dos abuelos”. Octavio Paz: "Himno entre ruinas," "Viento entero," "El prisionero". Ernesto Cardenal: "Oración por Marilyn Monroe," "En el lago de Nicaragua," "La noche". Nacy Morejon: “Mujer negra” “Chiriboga” “Cimarrones”. Essay: Rosario Castellanos: “Mujer que sabe latín”. Roberto Fernández Retamar “Calibán”. Octavio Paz: El laberinto de la soledad. For an updated list of references, consult with the area expert. Latin American: U.S. Latino Literature Narrative: Sabine Ulibarrí, short story collection (Tierra Amarilla; El Cóndor and other stories; Governor Glu Glu and other stories; Mi abuela fumaba puros; or The Best of Sabine R. Ulibarrí). Rolando Hinojosa-Smith, Estampas del valle y otras obras or Klail City y sus alrededores. Tino Villanueva, Crónica de mis años peores. Sandra Cisneros, La casa en Mango Street or Woman Hollering Creek. Gloria Anzaldúa, Borderlands/La frontera. Rosario Ferré, Maldito Amor or Papeles de Pandora. Cristina García, Soñar en cubano. Richard Rodriquez, Hunger of Memory. Esmeralda Santiago, When I was Puerto Rican. Junot Díaz, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao. Poetry section: Sandra Cisneros, “You bring out the Mexican in Me”, “Original Sin”, “Las Girlfriends” Pat Mora, “Legal Alien”, “Desert Women”, “Aztec Princess”. Lorna Dee Cervantes, “Refugee Ship”, “Poem For The Young White Man Who Asked Me How I, An Intelligent, Well-Read Person Could Believe In The War Between The Races”, “Oaxaca, 1974”.

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Alurista: “We have played Cowboys;” “Nuestro barrio.” Tino Villanueva: “Day Long-Day;” “Aquellos Vatos;”“Unción de palabras.” Piri Thomas. Down These Mean Streets (1967; 1997). José Antonio Villarreal, Pocho (1959). Rudolfo A. Anaya, Bless me, Ultima (1972). Drama: Selections from On New Ground: Contemporary Hispanic-American Plays, edited by M. Elizabeth Osborn. Luis Valdez, Zoot Suit and Other Plays. John Leguizamo, Spic-O-Rama. Culture Clash, Life, death and Revolutionary Comedy or Culture Clash in America. Essay: Luis Rafael Sánchez, “La guagua aérea”. For an updated list of references, consult with the area expert.



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M.A. READING LIST: SPANISH LINGUISTICS In addition to the books on the following reading list, students will meet with the professors to add pertinent articles or materials to prepare for the particular areas of the exams. Required Area (Second Language Acquisition): Ducate, Lara & Arnold, Nike. (2011). Calling on CALL: From Theory and Research to New Directions in Foreign Language Teaching. San Marcos, TX: CALICO. Geeslin, K. (2014). Handbook of Spanish Second Language Acquisition. Malden, MA: Blackwell. Hualde, José Ignacio et al. (2010). Introducción a la lingüística hispánica. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Lacorte, Manel. (2014). The Routledge Handbook of Hispanic Applied Linguistics. London, UK: The Routledge Publishing House. Lafford, B. & R. Salaberry. (2003). Studies in Spanish Second Language Acquisition: State of the Science. Washington, DC: Georgetown University Press. Azevedo, Milton. (2004). Introducción a la lingüística española. Madrid: Gredos Montrul, S. (2004). The acquisition of Spanish: Morphosyntactic development in monolingual and bilingual L1 acquisition and adult L2 acquisition. Amsterdam: Benjamins. Optional Areas Area: Applied Linguistics And Second Language Acquisition Subareas Skills Hyland, Ken. (2009). Teaching And Researching Writing. New York, NY: Pearson. Manchón, Rosa M. (2011). Learning-To-Write And Writing-To-Learn In An Additional Language. Philadelphia, PA: John Benjamins Publishing Company. Williams, Jessica. (2005). Teaching Writing In Second And Foreign Language Classrooms. Boston, MA: McGrawHill. Technology Ducate, L. & Arnold, N. (2011), Calling on CALL: From Theory and Research to New Directions in Foreign Language Teaching. San Marcos, TX: CALICO. González-Lloret, Marta & Ortega, Lourdes (2014). Technology-mediated TBLT. Phildelphia, PA: John Benjamins Publishing Company. Williams, Larence & J. Pettes (2014). Digital literacies in foreign language education: Research, perspectives, and best practices. San Marcos, TX: CALICO. Area: Bilingualism Beaudrie, S. M., Ducar, C., and K. Potowski (2014). Heritage Language Teaching: Research and Practice. Columbus, OH: McGraw-Hill Education. Beaudrie S. M. and M. Fairclough. (2012). Spanish as a Heritage Language in the United States: The State of the Field. Georgetown: Georgetown University Press.

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Benmamoun, A., S. Montrul, and M. Polinsky. (2010). White Paper: Prolegomena to Heritage Linguistics. Harvard University. Lipski, J. (2008). Varieties of Spanish in the United States. Washington: Georgetown University Press. Montrul, S. (2008). Incomplete Acquisition in Bilingualism. Re-examining the Age Factor. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. Silva-Corvalán, Carmen. 2014. Bilingual language acquisition. Spanish and English in the first six years. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Articles: Montrul, S. (2014). Structural changes in Spanish in the United States: Differential object marking in Spanish heritage speakers across generations. Lingua, (151), 177-196. Montrul, S., & Bowles, M. (2009). Is grammar instruction beneficial for heritage language learners? Dative case marking in Spanish. Heritage Language Journal, 7, 47–73. Montrul, S. & N. Sánchez-Walker. (2013). Differential Object Marking in Child and Adult Spanish Heritage Speakers. Language Acquisition, 20(2), 109-132. Pascual y Cabo, D. and J. Rothman. (2012). The (Il)logical Problem of Heritage Speaker Bilingualism and Incomplete Acquisition. Applied Linguistics 33(4), 1-7. Pascual y Cabo, D. & I. Gómez Soler. (2015). Preposition Stranding in Heritage Speaker Spanish. Heritage Language Journal 12(2), 186-209. Rothman, J. (2009). Understanding the nature and outcomes of early bilingualism: Romance languages as heritage languages. International Journal of Bilingualism 13(2), 155-165. Valdés, G. 2005. Bilingualism, Heritage Language Learners, and SLA Research: Opportunities Lost. The Modern language Journal, 89(3) 410-426. Area: History of the Spanish Language Lathrop, Thomas A.(1989). Curso de gramática histórica española. Barcelona: Editorial Ariel. Núñez Méndez, Eva. (2012). Fundamentos teóricos y prácticos de historia de la lengua española. New Haven And London: Yale UP. Poulter, Virgil L. (1990). An Introduction To Old Spanish: A Guide To The Study Of The History Of Spanish With Selected Readings. New York And Bern: Peter Lang. Series II, Romance Languages And Literature, Vol. 130. Pharies, David A. (2007). Breve historia de la lengua española. Chicago And London: The U Of Chicago Press. Menéndez Pidal, R. (1968). Manual de gramática histórica española. Madrid: Espasa-Calpe. Lloyd, Paul M. (1987). From Latin To Spanish. NP: American Philosophical Society. Spaulding, Robert K. (1975). How Spanish Grew. Berkeley, Los Angeles, And London: U Of California P. Area: Phonetics and Phonology Bybee, Joan L. 2006. From Usage to Grammar: The Mind's Response to Repetition Flege, James. 2003. "Assessing constraints on second-language segmental production and perception." In A. Meyer & N. Schiller (Eds.), Phonetics and Phonology in Language Comprehension and Production, Differences and Similarities, pp. 319-355. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.

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Pierrehumbert, Janet. 2003. "Phonetic diversity, statistical learning, and acquisition of phonology." Language and Speech: 46(2-3), 115-154. Schwegler, Armin, y Juergen Kempff. (2006). Fonética y fonología españolas. 3a ed. New York: Wiley. Simonet, Miquel. 2012. The L2 acquisition of Spanish phonetics and phonology. In J.I. Hualde, A. Olarrea & E. O'Rourke (Eds.), Handbook of Hispanic Linguistics. London: WileyBackwell. Area: Morphology and Syntax MontruL, Silvina (2012). El bilingüismo en el mundo hispanohablante. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell. Zagona, K. (2002). The syntax of Spanish. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Reference Books VanPatten, Bill & Benatti, G. Alessandro. 2001. Key Terms In Second Language Acquisition. New York, NY: Continuum. Ellis, Rod & Shintani, Natsuko (2014). Exploring Language Pedagogy Through Second Language Acquisition Research. New York, NY: Routledge. Ellis, Rod. 1994. The study of second language acquisition. Oxford: Oxford University Press Doughty, C. J. & Long, M. H. (2003). The handbook of second language acquisition. MA: Blackwell Publishing. Gass, S. M. 1989. Linguistic perspectives on second language acquisition. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press Montrul, Silvina. A. (2008). Incomplete acquisition in bilingualism. Philadelphia, PA: John Benjamins Publishing Company.



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M.A. and Ph.D. READING LISTS: PORTUGUESE MA List – Portuguese Minor Memorial do Convento by José Saramago Os Maias ou O Crime do Padre Amaro by Eça de Queirós Memórias Póstumas de Bras Cubas by Machado de Assis. A Força do Destino by Nélida Piñon O Eu Profundo e os outros Eus by Fernando Pessoa. (Rio de Janeiro: Nova Fronteira.1980). Menino de Engenho by José Lins do Rego. For an updated list of references, consult with the area expert. PhD Reading List (Portuguese Minor) José Saramago. Memorial do Convento Almeida Garrett. Viagens na Minha Terra Machado de Assis. Memórias Póstumas de Brás Cubas Eça de Queirós. O Crime do Padre Amaro Fernando Pessoa. O Livro do Desassossego Fernando Pessoa. O Eu Profundo e os outros Eus. (Rio de Janeiro: Nova Fronteira.1980) José Lins do Rego. Menino de Engenho Fernão Mendes Pinto. Peregrinação Luís de Camões. Os Lusíadas Lídia Jorge. A Costa dos Murmúrios Manuel Rui. Quem me Dera ser Onda Manuel Lopes. Os Flagelados do Vento Leste Mia Couto. Cada Homem é uma Raça Camilo Castelo Branco.Amor de Perdição Nélida Piñon. República dos Sonhos. ou A Força do Destino Clarisse Lispector. A Maçã no Escuro. Rachel de Queiroz. As Três Marias. For an updated list of references, consult with the area expert.



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ELIGIBILITY FOR THE DOCTORAL PROGRAM Successful completion of the Master's exam does not guarantee automatic acceptance into the doctoral program. The Master's committee will evaluate the student's examination and recommend in favor of either a terminal M.A. or of eligibility to continue. This assessment will become part of the student's file in the department. If the student wishes to apply for admission to the doctoral program, the Spanish graduate faculty will evaluate the Master's committee's assessment as well as the student's annual review and other factors. If the evaluation is favorable, the student may be accepted in the doctoral program. If the evaluation is unfavorable, a terminal Master's degree will be granted.



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The Ph.D. in Spanish The doctoral program in Spanish requires both greater breadth of study than the M.A. program and greater concentration in the area selected for specialization. To fulfill these requirements the student must demonstrate a reasonable comprehensive knowledge of literature and the ability to engage in original research. Texas Tech University offers the Ph.D. degree at CMLL with major concentrations in Hispanic literature and Spanish linguistics. Financial assistance is provided via assistantships and instructorships to promising graduate students enrolled in our programs. Support is often based on the typical academic year (Fall-Spring), and may include summer assignments as long as the department has enough opened sections. All prospective Ph.D. candidates must hold the M.A. in Spanish or an equivalent degree from another country. Admission to the Ph.D. program in Spanish at Texas Tech is selective, and all applicants are required to follow the same procedures. Degree Description Candidates for the Ph.D. in Spanish (Linguistics or Literature) must complete at least 60 hours of graduate coursework. Students that have obtained a Romance Language M.A. in Spanish at CMLL may count all hours earned at the Master's level with a B or better with the exception of some courses. Literature M.A. to Ph.D. students count all courses with a B or better except SPAN 5301: Writing for the Profession, SPAN 5354: Hispanic Literary Concepts and LING 5322: Theoretical and Research Foundations of Second Language Teaching). Linguistics M.A. to Ph.D. students count all courses with a B or better except LING 5322. Hours earned at the M.A. level from a previous institution are applicable and graduate students may transfer up to 21 hours of credit maximum, at the discretion of the Spanish Graduate Advisor. The Graduate School does not require a formal minor. However, the student may pursue a minor or one may be required by the student’s advisory committee. If a minor is taken, it must include at least 15 graduate hours in a program outside the student’s major (counted towards the 60 hours). The minor will be declared in the student’s doctoral degree plan. If a minor is taken, the major requires a minimum of 45 semester hours. If a formal minor is declared, it must be represented on the student’s doctoral committee and must be covered on the doctoral examination. If no minor is selected, students can take all the necessary credits within the Spanish program. The student must satisfy the preliminary examination requirement, pass qualifying examinations, and prepare and defend a dissertation to be admitted to candidacy.



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1. Hispanic Literature Track (60 hours) At least 45 hours of Hispanic literature courses from different periods and genres of Spanish American and Peninsular Spanish courses (See the literature curriculum above) are needed. Required courses: LING 5322 —Theoretical and Research Foundations of Language Teaching* SPAN 5301 — Writing for the Profession* SPAN 5352 — Methods of Literary Criticism SPAN 53XX — Any Spanish Linguistics course * Ph.D. students that have taken these courses at the M.A. level at CMLL do not need to re-take them unless they want a grade change. Other areas: 3-6 hours of elective courses such as: SPAN 5355: Seminar in Spanish Literature (Latin America, Peninsular or Transatlantic). SPAN 5345: History of the Spanish Language SPAN 5381: Hispanic Literature of the Southwest/Mexican Literature (1821-1848)/ Mexican-American Literature (1821-1848) ---------------------------------------------------------------SPAN 7000 Independent Study (Seville) SPAN 8000 Dissertation Hours (ABD Students) Language Requirement: Ph.D. students must also possess reading knowledge of two languages other than English and Spanish. See "Language Requirement for the Ph.D. degree" below. A minor in a language other than Spanish and English waives this requirement. 2. Spanish Linguistics Track (60 hours) At least 45 hours must come from the core courses designated as Spanish Linguistics and/or Second Language Acquisition sections. Required courses: LING 5322 —Theoretical and Research Foundations of Language Teaching* SPAN 5343 (2) — Studies in Spanish as a L2 (Part 1&2)* SPAN 53XX— One Spanish Literature course EPSY 5380 Quantitative Analysis EPSY 5382 Qualitative Analysis



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* Students that have taken this course at the M.A. level at CMLL do not need to retake it at the Ph.D. level unless they want a grade change. Other areas: SPAN 7000 Independent Study (Seville) SPAN 8000 Dissertation Hours (ABD Students) Language Requirement: Ph.D. students must also possess reading knowledge of two languages other than English and Spanish. See "Language Requirement for the Ph.D. degree" below. A minor in a language other than Spanish and English waives this requirement. 3. Minor A Minor at the Ph.D. level is optional, but encouraged. Any minor consists of 15-18 hours of coursework as part of the 60 hours for the degree. A student can choose a minor in consultation with the Graduate Studies Director or his/her committee of studies' chair. Recommended Minors: • • • • • • • •



Portuguese Applied Linguistics Comparative Literature Medieval and Renaissance Studies Women's Studies Classics, Greek or Latin English Linguistics German, French or Russian

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Language Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree All Ph.D. candidates must possess reading knowledge of two languages other than English and Spanish. This requirement can be met in one of the following ways: a. Students may fulfill the reading knowledge requirement by passing with a grade of C or better the second course of the sophomore sequence of the required languages. Intensive language courses at the graduate level are usually offered in the summer sessions. Students that complete Summer I and Summer II of a two languages other than Spanish and English at the graduate level can waive this requirement. b. Passing a standardized examination for each language. Consult with the advisor in the Department of Classical and Modern Languages and Literatures for proficiency exams furnished by the department or the Educational Testing Service. Arrangements for these examinations should be made in the applicable unit. The CMLL faculty in charge will provide test results using a "Foreign Language Requirement for the Ph.D. Degree Form" (See Appendix). Arrangements for testing for other foreign languages will be approved by the graduate dean. c. Students that minor in a third language other than English and Spanish are waived from the two languages requirement.

DEGREE PLANS FOR THE Ph.D. STUDENT After admission to a degree program, every applicant for the Ph.D. degree is required to complete and submit one copy of a degree plan form to the Graduate School for approval before the second semester of enrollment in the program. See the Graduate School form in the Appendix. To help students keep track of the requirements of our program and the general university requirements, please follow the guidelines of the form applicable to your degree in the following pages. Using this form may answer many questions before visiting with the current Graduate Advisor.



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Ph.D. IN LITERATURE



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Ph.D. IN LINGUISTICS



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THE Ph.D. CANDIDACY PROCESS Establishing the Ph.D. Committee(s) Upon admission to the Ph.D. program, a student will begin planning his/her studies under the advice of the Graduate Studies Advisor. By the second semester, the student should begin planning to form his/her respective exam and dissertation committees. A dissertation committee consists of at least three members, including the committee chair, who will be the student’s supervising professor. The chair must be a tenured or tenure-track member of the Spanish and Portuguese Division. The student, in consultation with the committee chair, selects the remaining committee members and chooses a tentative topic for the dissertation. Also in consultation with the committee chair, the student will select an exam committee (which may be different from the dissertation committee). When a student selects a minor as part of the Ph.D., he/she must be examined on the minor area and thus a faculty member from this area must form a part of the comprehensive exam committee. The following form/s must be turned in by the end of the first year in the doctoral program to the Graduate Advisor and to the academic graduate assistant.

Planning the Ph.D. Exam In the semester prior to taking the Ph.D. comprehensive exams, the student should arrange to meet with the doctoral committee to review reading lists and details of the exam format. Together, they should decide the exam dates (within the deadlines stipulated below), fill out the form "Letter of Intent to take the Ph.D. Exams" from our graduate academic assistant and have it signed by the Graduate Advisor (See Appendix). A copy will be kept with the Graduate Advisor and another one will be placed in the student’s file.



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Spanish & Portuguese Program THE Ph.D. EXAM COMMITTEE FORM 1. The Committee should be named by the end of the first year of Ph.D. Program. 2. Select a chair of the committee (chair is student's supervising professor) 3. A Committee consists of at least 3 members, including chair.

Student: ________________________________ R#_________________________ (printed)

________________________________ Date: _________________________ (signature)

Chair: Professor ______________________________ Date: ___________________ (printed)

_______________________________ (signature)

Member: Professor _____________________________ Date: ___________________ (printed)

_____________________________ (signature)

Member: Professor* _____________________________ Date: ___________________ (printed)

_____________________________ ________________________ (signature)

* If a professor teaches in a different department/university, indicate so in the form. Major/ Areas of Examination : ______________________________________________ Minor: _________________________________________________________________ Language Requirement: ____________________________________________________



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Spanish & Portuguese Program THE Ph.D. DISSERTATION COMMITTEE FORM 1. The Committee should be named by the end of the third semester in the Ph.D. Program. 2. Select a chair of the committee (chair is student's major supervising professor) 3. A Committee consists of at least 3 members, including chair.

Student: ________________________________ R#_________________________ (printed)

________________________________ Date: _________________________ (signature)

Chair: Professor ______________________________ Date: ___________________ (printed)

_______________________________ (signature)

Member: Professor _____________________________ Date: ___________________ (printed)

_____________________________ (signature)

Member: Professor* _____________________________ Date: ___________________ (printed)

_____________________________ ________________________ (signature)

* If a professor teaches in a different department/university, indicate so in the form. Major : ________________________________________________________________ Minor: _________________________________________________________________



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EXTERNAL MEMBER FOR THE COMMITTEE OF STUDIES Students writing an MA Thesis or a PhD dissertation occasionally need to have an external member as part of their committee. If this member is outside of Texas Tech, the process to request permission from the Graduate School is as follows: 1. The student's dissertation advisor initiates the request by emailing Dr. David Doerfert ([email protected] ) Associate Dean. The email must state a reason for adding an external member and include this member's credentials and current CV. 2. The Associate Dean will review this petition and reply directly to the dissertation advisor. 3. The student must notify of the outcome to the Spanish Graduate Advisor.



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THE DISSERTATION PROPOSAL During the final semester of coursework, the student may register for a 7000 course in addition to the required courses for his/her degree plan or his/her status as a GPTI. The purpose of taking a 7000 course this semester is to give the student time to prepare his/her dissertation proposal before taking the written exams the following semester. The dissertation proposal should be at least 20-25 pages along with a working bibliography and methodology. It must be turned in to all the dissertation committee members at the end of that semester. The dissertation proposal defense will be scheduled after the written exams. A dissertation proposal provides an overview of the proposed plan of work, including the general scope of the project, the basic research questions, research methodology, and the overall significance of the study. It should be written in a grant application-style submitted to a review board of scholars not necessarily working in the same area, but with broad research interests in the Humanities. The writing should be straightforward, spare, and substantiated with carefully selected examples and citations that support your own project ideas. It must fall within the parameters stated below and be presented in the following order: I. COVER SHEET. The cover sheet model below should be completely filled out and accompany the proposal when turned into the dissertation committee. II. PROPOSAL: 20-25 double-spaced pages (approx. 8,000 words). III. SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY: At least 3 pages of single-spaced entries with one line between each entry. (The MLA or APA styles SHOULD BE STRICTLY FOLLOWED.)



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DISSERTATION PROPOSAL GUIDELINES I. COVER SHEET. TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF CLASSICAL AND MODERN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES — SPANISH PROGRAM DISSERTATION PROPOSAL COVER SHEET Please complete the following form and attach a copy of your dissertation proposal and return to your dissertation committee. Student’s Name: __________________________________________________________ Date doctoral exams: _______________________________________________________ Date dissertation proposal due: _______________________________________________ Proposed title of dissertation: ________________________________________________ Date approved: ___________________________________________________________ Committee Members

Committee Signatures

Print names

_____________________________

________________________

_____________________________

________________________

_____________________________

________________________

_____________________________

________________________

Committee Chair

Committee Chair

Comments: ______________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________



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II. The PROPOSAL text should include, in the following order: (a) Full Working Title (b) Abstract or thesis statement: The abstract is limited to 350 words in length, on the central problem(s) and major aims of the study. What preliminary results have been found? (c) Significance: What contributions will the dissertation make to the particular area of study and to Hispanic studies in general? What are the broader implications of this project for the Humanities in general? (d) Background: How is your project unique? Include a concise review of the most important literature on the proposed topic(s), method(s), and theoretical approaches of the study (including recent dissertations). (e) Data/ Sources: An overview of the primary and secondary sources to be investigated. Indicate what data have been collected, what sources consulted, and what field contacts made to date (if appropriate). (f) Methodology/ Theory: What methods of analysis will be employed? What working hypotheses will inform these analyses? (g) Pilot study: where applicable, include the results of a pilot study to illustrate how the analysis will be conducted and what the possible results are (For Linguistics students) (h) Plan: Outline the probable chapters with a brief notion of what is to be included in each. (i) Timetable: Design a 6-, 12-, or 18-month feasibility projection indicating the progress of your research and writing. How can this project be realistically completed in the time allotted? III. SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY For the Literature concentration: A list of published sources pertinent to the proposed study (archival, manuscript, and field sources will be described under “Data” above). The entries should be divided into topic areas, and presented in a form consistent with the MLA citation style. For the Linguistics concentration: A list of all sources cited in the paper. This should be a comprehensive review of the literature in the field. They should be presented in a form consistent with the APA citation style.



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THE PH.D. EXAMS Overview The doctoral exams provide the student with the opportunity to demonstrate and integrate comprehensive knowledge of chosen fields of specialization, as well as to demonstrate his/her preparedness to enter candidacy and begin the process of researching and writing the dissertation. Doctoral students must take courses in as many areas outside of their exam areas, but within their main field of studies as possible. The Ph.D. examination is divided into: the written exams in the areas of specialization and minor (if one is previously declared), the oral exam(s) and the dissertation proposal defense. The Written Exams The written exams will be taken after the completion of all requirements on the degree plan. Exams must be scheduled to take place during a period when the student is enrolled (regular semesters or summer sessions). Graduate students may take additional credits of 7000 courses the semester they are taking their exams, but this semester will count as part of their allowed funding period. In order to comply with the university deadlines, Ph.D. exams will be given during: • • •

The first two weeks in October. The two weeks following Spring break. Summer term examinations depend on the availability of the committee.

Note: In order to become ABDs by the beginning of the Fall semester (for the academic calendar year), doctoral students must take their exams in the Spring or the Summer terms, with the committee's approval. Areas of Specialization Exams—Literature 1. Dissertation area: The student and committee chair will draw up an individualized reading list related to the dissertation project, including the works of the author(s) in question, relevant critical/theoretical sources and secondary bibliography. 2. ONE area from the Peninsular Literature Group (Medieval, Golden Age, 18th-19thCenturies and, 20-21st Centuries). 3. ONE area from the Spanish American Literature Group (Colonial, 19th-Century, Modernism, 20th-21st-Centuries Spanish American Literature, Chicano/Latino literature).

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4. A minor chosen in consultation with the dissertation Committee Chairperson and Graduate Studies Advisor. If a minor is not selected, the fourth exam is a fourth literature area. Areas of Specialization Exams—Linguistics 1. Dissertation area: The student and committee chair will draw up an individualized reading list presenting the dissertation project, including the works of the author(s) in question, relevant critical/theoretical sources and secondary bibliography. 2. ONE area from Second Language Acquisition. 3. ONE area from other Spanish Linguistics focus. 4. A minor chosen in consultation with the Dissertation Committee Chairperson and Graduate Studies Director. If a minor is not selected, the fourth exam is a fourth linguistics area. Reading Lists The student will develop his/her reading lists in consultation with the exam committee members. The Master's Exam reading list for the areas chosen by the student does not constitute the list for the doctoral exam, although it may be used as the basis for an expanded list in each area. The student should make sure that the committee chair and members have a final copy of the reading lists well in advance of the exam dates. Administration of the Exams The committee chair: 1) Arranges dates, times, and areas of written exams with student; exams must be scheduled to take place during the dates provided above. 2) Collects questions in envelopes corresponding to the days and topics of the exams. 3) Leaves questions with the staff member in charge who will also reserve rooms for the exam. 4) Distributes copies of answers to committee members. 5) Schedules and chairs oral exam (see below). 6) Informs the Graduate School of the exam results immediately upon completion. The student: 1) Agrees upon date and time of written exams with the committee chair. 2) Makes arrangements with chair about special needs. 3) Turns in exam to the secretary before 5:00 P.M.



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The committee members: 1) Submit questions. 2) Evaluate written exams. 3) Participate in oral exam. Exams Logistics Electronic equipment, backpacks, purses, books, notes, etc., are not allowed in the exam room. Written examinations The student may write the exams on four separate days (which may or may not be consecutive) during a two-week period, taking up to a maximum of eight hours each day. A student who fails only one section of the written exams will be required to repeat that section. If two or more sections of the written exam are failed, the entire set of comprehensive examinations must be repeated and passed. The committee chair will inform the Dean of the Graduate School of the results. The student will be allowed to repeat the exam no sooner than four months and no later than twelve months after the failed exam. A second failure of any part or of all of the written exams terminates the student's candidacy in the department. If any (or all) of the written answers are not satisfactory, the student will be examined orally as well. All exams must be graded as passing by the committee members before the dissertation defense can take place. The Oral Exam(s) and Dissertation Proposal Defense The exam committee will decide if: 1) All parts of the written exam are passed with no oral exams, or 2) One or more sections of the exams need to be defended orally. If oral exams are deemed necessary, the student will have a 1-1.5 hours oral examination in the format of a formal interview, and based on the written exam contents. If no oral exams are needed, the student will defend his/her dissertation proposal in front of the dissertation committee members. All the oral examinations must be scheduled at the discretion of the committee a few days following the written exam (Deadlines established in the TTU Academic Calendar). All exams, written and oral, must be passed; and the dissertation proposal approved before the committee recommends the student be admitted to candidacy to the Graduate School.



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Application for Doctoral Candidacy After a successful comprehensive exam process, the committee will fill out the form "Qualifying Exam Report" from the Graduate School website (See Appendix). All forms are given to the departmental graduate academic assistant to be forwarded to the Graduate School. A copy should be provided to the Graduate Advisor.

Important: Changes in Dissertation Topic/ Changes on Dissertation Committees After the exams, any and all changes (including changes in dissertation topic, reconstitution of the committee, or change of dissertation director) will require consent of the committee chairs and the graduate advisor, and may require that the candidate be examined over other areas. Students that change committees must fill out the "Form for Reporting Changes of Thesis/Dissertation Title and Committee" from the graduate school website (See Appendix).



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THE Ph.D. DISSERTATION There are no firm guidelines for the minimum or maximum length (in pages) for a doctoral dissertation in literature or linguistics. However, a survey of recent dissertations from comparable programs, particularly dissertations which are well received and whose authors have obtained satisfactory employment, suggests that dissertations containing substantially fewer than 200 pages are in the minority. Similarly, few dissertations in this category contain more than 400 pages.1 All Ph.D. dissertations in literature shall use the style sheet of the Modern Language Association of America (MLA). All Ph.D. dissertations in linguistics shall use the style sheet of the American Psychological Association (APA). Students should consult with their chair to ensure that the proper formatting style is used for their topic. Consult the Texas Tech University Catalog and the Graduate School website for additional information on dissertation preparation and formatting.

ABD Report of Progress on Dissertation All ABD (All But Dissertation) students enrolled in 8000-dissertation hours must fill out the form "Report of Progress on Dissertation" below at the end of each regular semester (Spring/Fall). Once the supervising professor’s grade and remarks have been added, a copy will be placed in the student's file, another copy will be kept by the supervising professor and the Graduate Advisor. The student will also receive a copy for his/her records. If this form is not submitted by the last day of each semester, a grade of NCR for the dissertation hours may result.

1 Inside Higher Education. Discussing the Dissertation (November 2014), Web. 30 July 2015.

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ABD Report of Progress on Dissertation This form is to be filled out each semester by students enrolled in 8000-dissertation hours. A copy will be placed in your file, another copy will be kept by your supervising professor, and you will receive a copy for your records once the supervising professor’s grade and remarks have been added. If this form is not submitted by the last day of each semester, a grade of NCR for the dissertation hours will result. The Spanish program follows the policies of the Graduate School office regarding the doctoral progress report on the dissertation. Candidate’s name: _________________________________________________________ Date of Comprehensive Exams: ______________________________________________ Date of Dissertation Proposal approved: _______________________________________ Dissertation’s working title: __________________________________________________ Dissertation Committee Chair: _______________________________________________ Current semester/year: _____________________________________________________ Total number of chapters projected: ___________________________________________ Chapters completed this semester: ____________________________________________ Chapters revised this semester: _______________________________________________ Other research this semester: ________________________________________________ Chapters approved to date: __________________________________________________ Comments by student: _____________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________ Grade:

CR______ NCR________

Signature of supervising professor: ____________________________________________ Comments by supervising professor: ___________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________



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THE DISSERTATION DEFENSE After all members of the Dissertation Committee are satisfied that the dissertation is in acceptable final form, the dissertation is presented at an oral defense with the presence of a Dean's representative. The defense is publicly announced and is open to all interested observers. The purpose of the defense is to allow the candidate to answer specific queries concerning the work presented in the dissertation, to elaborate on points requested by members of the Dissertation Committee or other observers, and to make any additional comments or observations deemed appropriate. It is important that the defense not be scheduled until all members of the dissertation committee have read and approved all parts of the dissertation. Under no circumstances should a defense be scheduled while the candidate is still actively working on the dissertation, and that the necessary additions and improvements can be made after the defense. The defense must be scheduled to take place before the Office of Graduate Studies filing deadline, and a complete draft of the dissertation (which must include all of the following: Table of contents, introduction, all chapters, conclusion, and complete bibliography) must be received by all Dissertation Committee members at least one month prior to the earliest possible date a defense may be scheduled. All material must be turned into the Graduate School in order for the student to graduate. There will be no exceptions to these deadlines. Estimated deadlines (refer to the most updated TTU Academic Calendar for exact dates) To have the degree granted in the

Summer semester (August) Fall semester Spring semester



Must have a complete dissertation to all committee members by Early May

Have your oral defense by

Submit the final documents to the Graduate School by their deadline of

Mid-June

1st week of July

Early August Early February

Late September Mid-March

Late October Early April

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SEVILLE TEACHING APPOINTMENT AWARD This teaching appointment is a good opportunity for graduate students to experience teaching in a study abroad context. Unlike on-campus teaching, study abroad involves having a sound teaching experience and effectiveness at TTU, understanding students’ needs when living abroad, raising students’ cultural awareness, providing a successful and long-lasting experience while learning the language and culture of Spain, and working well and respectfully with students and personnel in the Seville campus. This study abroad program is a very important language experience for the Spanish program, and one which the Spanish faculty wants to preserve and expand. This teaching appointment is the result of a highly competitive application process and reserved only for graduate students who demonstrate that they can work well in the Seville campus. For this reason, after the forms are received, the Spanish faculty as a whole discusses all the candidates, votes, and agrees on the top candidates. The faculty discusses the following areas: • Status in the program: ABDs have a better chance to obtain the position, but only if the student can successfully fulfill the other areas (see below) that are also evaluated. ABDs need to include in the application a written letter from their thesis directors with their approval to apply for the Seville position. If the application does not have the written approval of the thesis director, the application will not be considered. •

Excellent teaching skills: students’ evaluations, teaching observations, ability to teach only in Spanish, being able to promote communicative interactions in the classroom, impartiality when providing grades, professional conduct with students (not fraternizing with their students). If the applicant does not fulfill this requirement, the applicant will not continue to the next step of the process.



Good academic standing: grades, showing seriousness in studies and in the MA/PhD courses, progressing successfully during her/his program and dissertation, etc. Any concerns about the academic standing of the applicant will result in the applicant not being selected.



Good citizenship: works well and respectfully with others—meaning professors, colleagues, coordination team, director of Spanish-lower courses, and other departmental administrative personnel. If the applicant does not show that he/she can work well with others, the applicant will not be selected. Good citizenship also means participating in the life of the department.



Complete the form in a professional manner: complete sentences (no run-on sentences), providing clear statements and reasons for being in the Seville campus.

If the Spanish and Portuguese faculty believes that the applicant fails to complete one or more of the aforementioned requirements, the applicant will not be selected. You will have two times to apply during the academic year: (a) the September application is for the following summer and fall, and (b) the January application is for the following spring semester. Yet, fall applicants who have been accepted to teach in Seville will have preference to teach the following spring semester in case their Seville assigned courses in the fall do not make

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SEVILLE APPLICATION FORM September application Nombre: 1. Marcar la información correcta Estoy completando los cursos para mi MA Estoy completando los cursos para mi Ph. D Cursos completos (ABD) 2. Marcar la información correcta. Éste es mi… Primer semestre Segundo semestre Tercer semestre Cuarto semestre Quinto semestre Sexto semestre ------ semestre. Explicar, 3. Me interesa ir a Sevilla (enumerar por orden de preferencia, 1, 2, etc.) Verano 2018 Otoño 2018* *Note: Fall applicants who have been accepted to teach in Seville will have preference to teach the following spring semester in case their Seville assigned courses in the fall do not make. 4. Razones por las que quiero ir a Sevilla y razones por las que solicito el semestre X (200 palabras) 5. Durante mi estancia en Sevilla (50 palabras): como ABD haré la siguiente investigación… como no soy ABD, haré la siguiente investigación con los cursos de 7000… 6. ¿Cuáles han sido tus logros académicos hasta este momento (ej. Presentaciones en conferencias, proyectos de investigación, publicaciones, etc.)? 7. ¿Qué servicio has prestado al departamento de CMLL?

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SEVILLE APPLICATION FORM January application Nombre: 1. Marcar la información correcta Estoy completando los cursos para mi MA Estoy completando los cursos para mi Ph. D Cursos completos (ABD) 2. Marcar la información correcta. Éste es mi… Primer semestre Segundo semestre Tercer semestre Cuarto semestre Quinto semestre Sexto semestre ------ semestre. Explicar, 3. Me interesa ir a Sevilla (enumerar por orden de preferencia, 1, 2, etc.) Spring 2019* *Note: Fall applicants who have been accepted to teach in Seville will have preference to teach the following spring semester in case their Seville assigned courses in the fall do not make. 4.

Razones por las que quiero ir a Sevilla y razones por las que solicito el semestre X (200 palabras)

5. Durante mi estancia en Sevilla (50 palabras): como ABD haré la siguiente investigación… como no soy ABD, haré la siguiente investigación con los cursos de 7000… 6. ¿Cuáles han sido tus logros académicos hasta este momento (ej. Presentaciones en conferencias, proyectos de investigación, publicaciones, etc.)? 7. ¿Qué servicio has prestado al departamento de CMLL? Enviar por email esta información a la Dra. Elola para el 10 de septiembre a las 10:00 p.m.



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REGISTRATION FOR COURSES All coursework must be approved by the departmental Graduate Advisor BEFORE the student registers for classes. All changes in registration (adding, dropping, changing credit hours, etc.) must be reported to the departmental Graduate Advisor BEFORE the change is made. Failure to obtain prior approval for changes from the Graduate Advisor could result in revocation of financial support. Information about maximum allowable graduate hours is found in the most recent TTU Catalog. The Graduate Advisor must sign the schedule form before the student registers for his/her classes.

ALL BUT DISSERTATION (ABD) STUDENTS REGISTRATION PROCESS ABDs must provide the following information in order to register: 1. Who their dissertation advisor is, 2. Which summer session/semester they need to enroll in, and 3. Whether or not they are going to be distance students. This information is necessary to create a section for each ABD.



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CLASSICAL AND MODERN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES DEPARTMENT SPANISH & PORTUGUESE DIVISION SCHEDULE APPROVAL FORM This form is to be filled out and approved BEFORE registering for any classes. The Graduate Advisor must sign this form and a copy should be given to the Graduate Administrative Assistant before the semester begins or before the add/drop period. Name: _______________________________________ R#: _________________________________________ Date: ________________________________________ Proposed classes: Class number and title

CRN

Days

Time

________________________

_____________

___________

_______

________________________

_____________

___________

_______

________________________

_____________

___________

_______

________________________

_____________

___________

_______

Approved: ____________________________ Graduate Advisor Signature



_________________ Date

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ANNUAL REPORTS Every spring semester all M.A. and Ph.D. students must complete a report describing their activities for the past calendar year and plan for the year to come. These annual reports thus provide the student with an opportunity to review his/her own progress in relation to expectations, and it also keeps the Graduate Advisor aware of a student's progress. The annual report forms (see Appendix) are our means of collecting data on when a student intends to graduate and whether our current graduate teaching assistants wish to renew their teaching appointments for the next academic year. A complimentary progress form is used to keep track of the courses all funded and unfunded M.A. students have completed. This form must be turn in to the Graduate Advisor at the end of each academic semester. See "M.A. Candidate Progress Form" or "Ph.D. Candidate Progress Form" (See Appendix).

ACADEMIC PROBATION AND SUSPENSION Every student enrolled in the Graduate School, whether working toward a degree or not, is required to maintain a high level of performance and to comply fully with the policies of the institution. The Graduate School reserves the right to place on probation or to suspend any postbaccalaureate or graduate student who does not maintain satisfactory academic standing or who fails to conform to the regulations of the university. Students who are admitted to a degree program on condition of maintaining a required GPA are automatically on academic notice. Failure to fulfill the conditions stipulated at the time of admissions will result in termination from the program. Students whose overall graduate GPA falls below 3.0 are placed on academic probation. During the following term, if their overall GPA remains less than 3.0 and their term GPA is greater than 3.0, they are placed on continued probation. They are placed on academic suspension in the second consecutive term in which their overall GPA is less than 3.0. Students placed on academic suspension are required to remain out of the Graduate School for one term. Summer terms and/or trimester count as one term. In accordance with OP 64.07, any student who has been suspended must appeal to the Graduate School if reinstatement is desired. A student who is placed on academic suspension twice will not be allowed to return to the Graduate School.

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Students may be suspended for unprofessional conduct such as cheating, plagiarism and documented misconduct. Any appeal of such action is subject to the provisions of the Code of Student Conduct. See the Student Handbook for further information.

CONTINOUS ENROLLMENT Graduate students on assistantships. Graduate students on an assistantship position (GA/TA/GPTI/RA) must enroll in at least 3 credits during each summer term of employment. If you have an appointment for summer II, you must be enrolled in at least 3 credits during summer II Continuous enrollment. Graduate students who have begun thesis or dissertation research must register for 6000 or 8000 courses, as appropriate, in each regular semester and at least once each summer until all degree requirements have been completed, unless granted an official leave of absence from the program for medical or other exceptional reasons. This means that if a doctoral or master’s (thesis option) student is off campus or does not have an assistantship this summer, they must enroll in 1 credit of 6000 or 8000, as appropriate, during the summer, unless they plan to graduate in August (see below for term of graduation requirements). If you did not enroll for 1 credit of 6000 or 8000, as appropriate, during the summer I, then you must enroll in credit during summer II. Term of graduation. Graduate students in a doctoral or master’s (thesis option) program must enroll in at least 3 credits during the term they graduate. Graduate students in a nonthesis master’s program must enroll in 1 credit of non-thesis coursework in the term they graduate. This means that doctoral or thesis master’s students must enroll in 3 credits this summer and that non-thesis master’s students must enroll in 1 credit this summer. If you did not enroll as required during summer I, then you must enroll during summer II.



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PETITIONS AND REQUIREMENT CHANGES The requirements, regulations, and procedures are established by CMLL and apply to all graduate students. The delineation of these regulations represents the collective effort of the graduate faculty, and only under truly extraordinary circumstances will exceptions be granted. All petitions should be requested in writing to the student's committee of studies and Graduate Advisor. Petitions to the Graduate Committee and Graduate Advisor are required in the following cases: § § §

Permission to take an independent study (7000) course (See form below). Permission to take an elective course outside the department (See form below). Permission to take more than 12 hours of graduate courses per semester.

Written copies of any petitions must be turned in to the Spanish Graduate Advisor and the Departmental advisor (domestic or international). Note: Under university regulations, students retain the option of following the requirements of their program that were in effect at the time of their entrance into the program, even in the face of subsequent changes, or of following the modified requirements. However, each student must meet all requirements for the chosen program. Thus, for example, a student who enters the program under one set of requirements but chooses to be examined under the requirements in effect at the time of the examination must meet all requirements in effect at the time of examination. The Spanish Graduate Committee will not waive this general obligation.



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Independent Study Courses Independent study courses are reserved for the following cases: 1) Students who have exhausted all normal course offerings in a given area and who wish to pursue an advanced topic, with the Graduate Advisor's approval; 2) Doctoral students preparing their dissertation proposal before taking their comprehensive exams, and 3) Students that teach in our Seville Center (See information about the Seville Teaching Appointment above). M.A. students will generally find that each semester a sufficient number of graduate courses in each concentration are offered such that independent studies are rarely warranted for M.A. students. Under no circumstances should an independent study course be given in place of a normally offered course taught in another semester, or to improve an unsatisfactory grade. A student contemplating an independent study should petition the Graduate Committee and the Spanish Graduate Advisor by filling out the "Independent Study Course Petition Form" (See the form below). Once approved, the petition will serve as a syllabus for the course and should include (1) a brief description of the proposed course of study; (2) a working bibliography; (3) a description of the graded work that will be done, with dates for turning in work clearly indicated; (4) the signed agreement of the supervising professor. Fill out form below.



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CLASSICAL AND MODERN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES DEPARTMENT —SPANISH & PORTUGUESE PROGRAM Independent Study Course Petition (SPAN 7000/ PORT 7000) Date:____________________________

Spanish_______

Portuguese_______

Student's name: ______________________________ Raider #: ________________________ Semester: ___________________ Previous Independent Studies? No______Yes*______ *If yes give dates and instructor of previous independent study: ___________________________________________ ___________________________________________ Professor Endorsement: __________________________Signature:__________________ Name

Graduate Committee Endorsement: ___________________________________________ Chair's name and signature

Date: _______________________ Title of class: _____________________________________________________________ Justification of need: Course description: Time line of course work/schedule of class meetings: Graded work to be completed and due dates: Attach working bibliography (MLA or LSA style) Note: Under no circumstances should an independent studies course be given in replacement of a normally offered course taught in another semester, to improve an unsatisfactory grade, or to prepare for comprehensive examinations. Exceptions to this rule are only given to GPTIs that teach in the TTU Seville Center.

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Courses outside CMLL Graduate students may be allowed to take a course outside of CMLL as long as the student's main advisor approves and justifies the need for it. Students seeking to minor in areas outside of CMLL or obtain a graduate certificate should also have their main advisor's approval prior to obtain the Graduate Advisor's approval and signature. All petitions will be directed to the Department Chair who will evaluate these requests in a case-by-case basis. Fill out form below.



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CLASSICAL AND MODERN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES DEPARTMENT —SPANISH & PORTUGUESE PROGRAM Permission to take a course outside of CMLL Date:____________________________ Student's name: ______________________________ Raider #: ________________________ Semester: _________________Previous course outside of CMLL? No______Yes*______ *If yes give dates, course title and instructor of previous course: ___________________________________________ ___________________________________________ ___________________________________________ Committee Chair Endorsement:_______________________________________________ Chair's name and signature

Date: _______________________ Title of class: _____________________________________________________________ Justification of need: Course description:

Graduate Advisor Endorsement: _____________________________________________ Name and signature

Department Chair Approval: ______Yes

_____No

__________________________ Department Chair's signature

Note: Provide a copy of this form to the Graduate Advisor.

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LEAVE OF ABSENCE Any student who fails to register during a fall or spring semester (or during either summer session once thesis or dissertation research has begun), and who does not have an official leave of absence from study is subject to review for readmission by the standards in effect at the time of reconsideration. Official leave of absence, which is granted by the Dean of the Graduate School upon departmental recommendation, may be requested only in case of serious medical conditions and other exceptional reasons. Normally, leaves of absence will not exceed one year. Leaves of absence do not extend the maximum time allowed for completion of the degree. Request for leaves of absence must be sent to and approved by the Associate Dean and by the student’s faculty advisor including any supporting documentation prior to their leaving the university.



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STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS WITHIN CMLL CÉFIRO: ENLACE CULTURAL Y LITERARIO Céfiro is a nationally-recognized Spanish Graduate student organization. The Spanish/Portuguese graduate students are a vital part of this organization, which is responsible for a variety of graduate student activities. Each fall, they host an International Cultural Day in the Foreign Languages Building in which they spotlight the many cultures/ nations represented in the department. Every spring, Céfiro hosts an international graduate conference in which many faculty members and students present academic papers. In addition, the organization produces a yearly journal, giving graduate students opportunities for peer-reviewed publication and editorial experience. Membership Membership is open to any and all graduate students currently enrolled at Texas Tech whose area or interest of study is: Latin American and Iberian languages, literatures and cultures. Membership responsibilities vary depending upon the activity or duty for which each individual volunteers. The annual fee is used to fund the yearly activities. Membership benefits include discounted registration rates for the annual conference and journal subscription. Céfiro, the Journal Since 1999, Céfiro Journal has been publishing insightful essays on the Luso-Hispanic literatures and cultures from the Iberian Peninsula and Latin America. Back issues of the Céfiro Journal are available on Dialnet.

(SEE APPENDIX BELOW)

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APPENDIX 1. Graduate Application Change Form (Download from the Graduate School website)

82



2. Foreign Language Requirement for M.A. and Ph.D. students (Request from the Graduate Advisor)



83



3. General Fellowships/Scholarships



84



4. Letter of Intent M.A. Exams (Request from the graduate administrative assistant)



85



5. Letter of Intent Ph.D. Exams (Request from the graduate administrative assistant)



86



6. M.A. Exams Report (Download from the Graduate School website)



87



7. Qualifying Exam/ Ph.D. Exams Report (Download from the Graduate School website)



88



8. Form for Reporting Changes of Thesis/Dissertation Title or Committee (Download from the Graduate School website)



89



9. M.A. Degree Plan (Request from Spanish Graduate Advisor)



90



10. Ph.D. Degree Plan (Request from Spanish Graduate Advisor)



91



11. Annual Report for M.A. and Ph. D. students (Request from Graduate Advisor) ANNUAL REPORT SPANISH AND PORTUGUESE GRADUATE PROGRAM *This report must be accompanied by a CV _____________(Academic Year) Student Name: __________________________________________________________ Dissertation OR M.A. Committee Chair:_____________________________________ Members: _________________________________________ _________________________________________ Minor (Optional): ______________________________ Entry into the MA/ PhD program (sem/yr): Work completed toward the degree Courses Exams Dissertation chapters completed Give numbers (#) of honors and special achievements in

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

1) Awards, scholarships 2) Presentations (regional, national or international) 3) Publications (academic) 4) Publications (creative)

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5) Céfiro (# of activities involved) 6) Spanish Club (# of activities involved) 7) Other events or services (specify) Honors and special achievements during this academic year (write title of publications, presentations, presentations and awards, fellowships, etc.)

Goals for the next academic year (presentations, grant applications, publications, courses):

Projected timetable (completed and/or anticipated work) completion of coursework:

Year and semester

language(s) requirement: dissertation proposal: M.A and / or Ph.D. exams: completion of dissertation: Qualifying Examinations Area(s): Dissertation Topic:



93



Expected/Desired Graduation Date:

Part II: Excellence in Teaching 1. What courses have you taught previously at Texas Tech?

SPAN 1507: SPAN 2303 Culture





SPAN 3303 Intermediate Conversation





SPAN 3307 Intro to Hispanic Literatures Other

SPAN 2301 SPAN 3306 Hispanic Life and

SPAN 3305 Intermediate Grammar Other:

2. Do you have a teaching portfolio (teaching evaluations; activities you have created; video recordings of classes)?

3. When was the last time you had a teaching evaluation? What did the evaluation say? Have you made improvements to your teaching based on the evaluation?

4. What courses would you be interested in teaching within our program?

Part III: Master / Dissertation Committees: After reading the annual review (and dissertation materials, if applicable), all members of the committee meet with the student and discuss the report (and dissertation progress, if applicable) before January_____, ________. The revised annual review and committee report, signed by the student and the members of the dissertation committee, are due to the Graduate Advisor by ___________, __________. Progress assessment (on schedule,

94



ahead of, lagging behind milestones)

Quality of work (coursework, qualifying examinations, dissertation material)

Recommendations to the student: (courses, professional activities, teaching, etc.)

Signatures: The Student “signs” the Report by emailing it to the Graduate Advisor, as stipulated at the beginning of the Report form. That email must be copied to the members of the Dissertation Committee. Students without a committee will fill out and email this form to the Graduate Advisor. Students without a committee will be assigned a temporary one the day of the annual report (_________, ________). The Committee members “sign” one copy of the Report below after the meeting with the student. The signed form will be part of the student’s permanent file. _______________________________ Faculty's signature

___________________ Date

_______________________________ Faculty's signature

___________________ Date



95



_______________________________ Faculty's signature

___________________ Date

_______________________________ Student's signature

___________________ Date



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graduate student manual - Texas Tech University Departments

GRADUATE STUDENT MANUAL Spanish & Portuguese Program A guide for current and incoming graduate students and instructors. Effective since Spring 2016 ...

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