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Weight Loss Challenge M

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W h a t d o yo u h a v e t o Lo s e?

©2011 Herbalife International of America, Inc. All rights reserved. Printed in USA. #7935-US-02 05/11

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INTRODUCTION

WIN WITH THE WEIGHT LOSS CHALLENGE the Weight loss Challenge is making winners out of everyone. From the participants who are losing weight to the Distributors who are building their business like never before, a Weight loss Challenge is a great way for people to discover the benefits of herbalife® products. each person who has experienced the power of the Weight loss Challenge spreads the word to others, creating incredible momentum. EVERYTHING YOU NEED inside, learn how easy it is to win with the Weight loss Challenge. this manual includes a list of supplies you’ll need and offers class outlines and week-by-week handouts. at a minimal cost, you can get started and duplicate your success within your organization. Make sure to comply with local laws and regulations, including those that apply to advertising the Challenge, use of public and private property, etc. For tips and tools, visit the Weight loss Challenge section on Myherbalife.com (tools & training ➝ Business ➝ Business Methods ➝ Daily Methods of operation (DMos) ➝ Weight loss Challenge). and send Challenge participants to herbalife’s Weight loss Challenge website at herbalifeWlC.com to enhance what they learn in class. EASY TO GET STARTED all you need is a few participants to get started. You may find that 20 participants is ideal, up to an allowable maximum of 40 participants per Challenge. Challenge participants are a motivated group, so they’ll be receptive to your retailing efforts. they already have weight-loss goals – and herbalife® products can help them get there. Retention and recruiting go hand in hand with the Weight loss Challenge, especially since participants may choose to participate in future Challenges. THE FUN FACTOR the most important element to any Challenge is…fun! You’ll find that socialization, community, results and recognition keep the momentum going. as a Weight loss Challenge coach, your enthusiasm will motivate and inspire everyone in your group. With this amazing Business Method, you’ll enjoy coaching people to get incredible results while growing your business at the same time. step up to the Challenge today!

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Section one: Setting Up for a SUcceSSfUl claSS Starting Out . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Distributor Weight Loss Challenge Rules and Guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Section two: phone ScriptS Outgoing Voice Mail Phone Script . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Registration Phone Scripts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Section three: getting ready for claSS Preparing for Week 1 and Beyond... • Before the First Class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • Money . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • Setting Up Stations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • Coaches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • Giveaways . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Registration Handouts for Week 1 • Weigh-Ins and Measures Weekly Record . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • Weight Loss Challenge Participation Agreement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • Weight Loss Challenge Food/Drink Log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • Welcome Letter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • References List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

10 10 10 10 13 14 15 16 18 19 20

Section foUr: oUtlineS for teaching claSSeS Trainer Outline for Week 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Trainer Outline for Week 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Section five: weekly topicS and participant handoUtS week 1: protein • Protein 101 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • Protein Foods At-a-Glance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . week 2: Meal plans, Snacking, water • Meal Plans ❍ Meal Plan “A” – 1,200 Calories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ❍ Meal Plan “B” – 1,500 Calories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ❍ Meal Plan “C” – 1,800 Calories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • Food Lists for Meal Planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • Lose a Pound a Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • Low-Calorie Snacks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • Quiz: Know Your Snacks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • Answer Key: Know Your Snacks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • Water Works . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . W

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

week 3: Metabolism • Rev Up Your Metabolism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 • Metabolism: Truths and Myths . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 • Power Your Metabolism With Protein . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51

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week 4: carbohydrates, Shopping and cooking, cellular nutrition • Good Health On Hand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • Lighten Up Your Meals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • Tasteful Tips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • Recipe Redo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • Protein-Powered Shake Recipes With Herbalife® Formula 1 nutritional Shake Mix . . . . . . • Additional Protein-Powered Recipes With Herbalife® Formula 1 nutritional Shake Mix . . . . • Healthy Breakfast – Feel Good and Control Your Weight . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • Maximize Your Health With Cellular nutrition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

52 55 56 58 60 63 64 65

week 5: nutrition labels, fats, portion control • Look at the Label . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • The Skinny on Fats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • Good and Bad Fats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • Meal Size Matters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • Be Wise to Portion Size . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • Quiz: Portion Distortion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • Answer Key: Portion Distortion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

66 68 70 71 72 73 75

week 6: digestive health • Weight Loss Begins With Digestive Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • Quiz: What Do You Know About Digestive Health? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • Answer Key: What Do You Know About Digestive Health? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • Digest This! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

77 78 80 82

week 7: dining out • Dining-Out Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • Fast-Food Frenzy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • Quiz: The Ins and Outs of Dining Out . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • Answer Key: The Ins and Outs of Dining Out . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

83 85 86 88

week 8: fiber • The Fiber Factor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ❍ Tips for Increasing Fiber Intake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • eat Your Fruits and Veggies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • Fruits and Vegetables – Add Color to Your Life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • Ripe for the Picking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

92 93 94 95 96

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

week 9: Sugar • Surrounded by Sugar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 • Sugar Hide-and-Seek . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 • Sizing Up Sugar for Kids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 week 10: exercise • Shape Up Your Life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • Seven Ways to Look Great – Target These Major Muscle Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • How Often Should You Work Out? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • Calorie Burners: Activities That Turn Up the Heat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ❍ Calorie-Burning Activity Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • How Much Does It Take to Burn It Off? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • exercise for Body and Mind . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • Fitting in Fitness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111

week 11: heart health • Do You Have the Heart of a Champion? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • Heart of the Matter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • Heart to Heart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • Cardiovascular Health – Q & A With Lou Ignarro, Ph.D. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • Take Good Health to Heart – Q & A With Luigi Gratton, M.D., M.P.H. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

112 113 114 115 116

week 12: Maintenance, long-term wellness • Tips for Staying Active . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • Keep Fitness On Track . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • Tip the Scale In Your Favor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • The Deciding Factor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • Calcium Challenge – not Just for Your Bones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • Weight Loss Challenge Feedback Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

117 118 119 122 123 126

week 13: final weigh-ins and Measures appendix • Appendix A: Taking Good Measurements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127 • Appendix B: Products by Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128 • Appendix C: Wellness Questionnaire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129

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SECTION ONE: Setting Up for a Successful Class

STARTING OUT

1. know the rUleS Familiarize yourself with the “Distributor Weight Loss Challenge Rules and Guidelines” (located at the end of this section) and the “Weight Loss Challenge Participation Agreement” (located in the “Registration Handouts for Week 1” at the end of Section Three).



2. reSearch, find and SecUre a location Look for a place with tables, chairs and, ideally, a kitchen setup where teas, shakes and samples can be prepared. Aim for a professional, yet fun, boardroom-type, face-to-face setting. Find a place where you will have enough room to start and grow. You might try a church, library, office space, community center, etc. (with permission). Although you might be able to secure such a space for free, be prepared to pay a fee. A reasonable price range for this type of facility is between $25 to $75 per week.





3. pick a Start date for yoUr weight loSS challenge 4. advertiSe Begin advertising the week prior to the scheduled class start date. Create your advertising plan: ❍ ad slicks. Select the main newspaper/periodical that people receive in the area where you plan on having the classes. One large ad (½-page display) that runs once is better than a small classified ad that runs multiple days. Use the approved ad slicks available to you. (For downloadable ad slicks, go to MyHerbalife.com ➝ Tools & Training ➝ Business ➝ Business Methods ➝ Daily Methods of Operation (DMOs) ➝ Weight Loss Challenge.) ❍ full-page flyers. With permission, distribute or display flyers at businesses within the vicinity of the class location. (For downloadable flyers, go to the “Weight Loss Challenge” section of MyHerbalife.com [see location above].) ❍ word of mouth. Use the “Who do you know?” approach. Also, talk to people who live in the area where the class will be held. ❍ have your guests invite their own. Invite existing customers who live in the area where the class will be held, and ask them to invite guests. This is one of the best ways to bring people in! (note: The results of your advertising will vary, depending on the newspaper or other media chosen, geographical location, size of ad, etc.) ● ●

5. prepare for the phone to ring! Make sure you’re already familiar with the phone scripts in Section Two of this manual, and take care of the following before advertising: ❍ outgoing voice mail message. Use the phone script in Section Two as a guide to recording this message. It should include the phone number for your direct-line or toll-free phone number. ❍ Script for answering calls live or for doing callbacks to preregister people. ❍ registration list. Be ready to start a list of everyone interested in taking the course.



6. prepare for the weight loSS challenge • 6

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See “Section Three: Getting Ready for Class” for details on setting up for your classes. I

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SECTION ONE: Distributor Weight Loss Challenge Rules and Guidelines

Distributor Weight Loss Challenge

RULES AND GUIDELINES the weight loss challenge rules and guidelines set forth below have the force and effect of, and are in addition to, herbalife’s other rules, including the rules of conduct and distributor policies, the U.S. Supplemental rules and the herbalife nutrition club® rules. non-italicized content represents the rule itself and is mandatory. Italicized content represents “best practices” and/or further details. 1. MaXiMUM nUMBer of participantS Each Weight Loss Challenge (“Challenge”) is limited to a maximum of 40 participants. We recommend that you have 20 to 30 participants per Challenge. Keep in mind that a Challenge may include as few as 3 and up to the maximum of 40 participants. For example, if you have 120 people ready to start their Challenge today, you must start 3 or more separate Challenges in order to comply with this Rule. We also recommend that an Independent Distributor be assigned as a personal coach to every 12 to 15 participants. 2. perMiSSiBle feeS participation fee: Participation fees may not be used to generate a profit and, under no circumstance, may they exceed $35.* weight-gain fee: Distributors may charge a weight-gain fee of $1* per pound for weight gained since a participant’s last recorded weigh-in. absence fee: Distributors may charge an absence fee of $5* for each absence from a weekly meeting. One (1) absence is allowed without penalty. The only permissible action for non-payment of weight-gain and absence fees is disqualification from the Challenge; Distributors may not otherwise press or pursue participants (or former participants) for payment. 3. MaXiMUM payoUt First-prize payout for each Challenge may not exceed $599.* There are 2 reasons for this maximum payout amount: • •

Participants should be driven by the results they will achieve, with the “extra” benefit of possibly winning money. Larger funds could encourage participants to engage in unhealthy or excessive weight loss and exercise practices; therefore, we dictate this reasonable maximum prize amount.

4. dUration each Challenge must run for a minimum of 6 weeks. • We recommend that each Challenge runs for 12 weeks. This allows the participants to better reach their goals during the course of the Challenge. • The Weight Loss Challenge Manual, MyHerbalife.com support materials, and Herbalife’s Weight Loss Challenge website for participants (HerbalifeWLC.com) are based on a 12-week program. *Amount is in U.S. dollars.

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SECTION ONE: Distributor Weight Loss Challenge Rules and Guidelines

5. weekly MeetingS Weekly meetings are a required element of any Challenge. They may be conducted in any suitable location or online. Meetings should include a weekly weigh-in, discussion of the participants’ progress, educational talks by the Distributor(s)/coach(es), and formulation of a plan and/or goal for the coming week. 6. recoMMending herBalife® prodUctS Distributors may always recommend, promote and educate on Herbalife® products, but may not require that the products be purchased or consumed as part of a Challenge. 7. refUnding the participation fee The participation fee must be fully refunded if requested by the participant within the first 48 hours of the Challenge start date. Refunds requested more than 48 hours after the Challenge commences may be granted at the discretion of the responsible Distributor(s). 8. advertiSing Herbalife creates a variety of finished ads for the Weight Loss Challenge. These tools can be found at MyHerbalife.com (Tools & Training ➝ Business ➝ Business Methods ➝ Daily Methods of Operation (DMOs) ➝ Weight Loss Challenge). Distributor-created ads must be compliant with all Herbalife Rules, including the Rules of Conduct and Distributor Policies, the U.S. Supplemental Rules and (where appropriate) the Herbalife nutrition Club® Rules. When advertising a Weight Loss Challenge, Distributors may include their name and phone number in the ad. If the Challenge is to take place at a nutrition Club, the ad may include the name of the nutrition Club, name of the Club operator, and the Club’s phone number; however, Distributors may only provide the address for the Challenge through personal interaction, not through the advertisement. In addition, Weight Loss Challenge ads may not state or imply that persons will receive money for the mere act of participating in a Challenge. Only 4 participants in each Challenge actually receive cash payouts. Ads may state or imply that persons who win the Challenge can earn money for doing so. examples of Acceptable Ad Statements • “Weight Loss Challenge winners can earn dollars for losing pounds!” • “Challenge winners can earn cash to lose weight!” examples of Unacceptable Ad Statements • “earn dollars for losing pounds!” • “We pay you to lose weight!” 9. reqUired participation agreeMent every participant must review and sign a Participation Agreement, which must be kept on file by the Distributor(s) for at least 1 year from signing and produced to Herbalife upon request. The Participation Agreement form is included in this manual. (See “Section Three: Registration Handouts for Week 1.”) 10. State of verMont The standard Weight Loss Challenge model, as set forth in this manual and in these Rules, is prohibited by law in the state of Vermont. If you are interested in using this tool in Vermont, you must contact the Herbalife Distributor Relations department for specific guidance. 11. MiniMUM age The minimum age for participation in a Weight Loss Challenge is 14, and persons ages 14 to 17 require written permission from a parent or legal guardian. 8

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SECTION TWO: Phone Scripts

oUtgoing voice Mail phone Script Below is an example of what you would record as an outgoing voice mail message for the phone number that will appear in all of your advertising for the class. It is recommended that you run these calls as a live number, so that you can answer calls as they come in, or have someone do that for you. However, you can record the message below in case you aren’t able to take the call; this will allow people to leave a message so that you can call them later to provide more information or preregister them for the class. outgoing voice Mail Script: Thank you for calling [your business name]. I’m either on the phone or away from my desk. If you are calling to register for the [name of the particular city you are advertising in] Weight Loss Challenge, please identify which class you are registering for, and leave your name and number, and I will call you back as soon as possible! regiStration phone ScriptS next are examples of registration phone scripts. Use them as a guide when taking a call live, preregistering people or returning calls for messages they may have left you. greeting for a live call: [Your business name] this is [your name]! Script for returning a call when a message is left: Hello, this is [your name] with [your business name], and I’m returning a call from [person’s name]. Is he/she available? He/she called to preregister for the class and wanted more information. …then give the person registering the following details about the class: • Start date • location of the class • time for weigh-ins and Measures • class start time. Ask the participant to come to class on time, since it starts promptly, and inform them that it will last about half an hour (30 minutes). • participation fee. To participate in the 12-week Weight Loss Challenge, each person pays a fee of $35. (See Rule 7 regarding refunds in the “Distributor Weight Loss Challenge Rules and Guidelines” at the end of Section One.) explain that, with a minimum of the fee going toward administrative costs, this and all other money collected during the 12-week course will be paid out in cash and prizes at the end of that period to the top three people in class who have lost the greatest percentage of body weight. If they ask whether you offer nutrition or weight-management programs, tell them that Herbalife does have programs and products available and that they may purchase them if they choose. However, explain that they are under no obligation to purchase products in order to take part in the class. Collect their complete contact information. These are great leads! Tell them you look forward to seeing them in class, and briefly give them the class location and start time, as well as the time for Weigh-Ins and Measures, once more. W

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SECTION THREE: Getting Ready for Class

PREPARING FOR WEEK 1 AND BEYOND...

Before the First Class prepare regiStration folderS for participantS Prepare two-pocket folders that participants will receive in the first class; in the folders, insert hard copies of the following registration handouts: (These can be found at the end of this section and are available in the “Weight Loss Challenge” section of MyHerbalife.com, “Before the First Class.”) left-side folder pocket: Weight Loss Challenge Participation Agreement right-side folder pocket: • Weigh-Ins and Measures Weekly Record • Welcome Letter • References List • Weight Loss Challenge Log

Money To take part in the Challenge, each participant pays a $35 fee. A minimal amount of every $35 is used to cover administrative costs (e.g., photocopy and print costs for assorted handouts, and purchasing of the supplies listed below). note: This fee is refundable within the first 48 hours of the Challenge start date. (For more details, see the “Distributor Weight Loss Challenge Rules and Guidelines” at the end of Section One.) The remaining money, in addition to weight-gain and absence fees, will be paid out in cash and prizes to the winners. (See the “Weight Loss Challenge Participation Agreement” for a detailed explanation of these fees and how the prize money is to be divided among winners.) note: First-prize winner payout per each group of participants should not exceed $599. (See the “Distributor Weight Loss Challenge Rules and Guidelines” at the end of Section One.)

Supplies The following is a list of things you may need for the classes: 1. Herbalife pens 2. Receipt pad 3. All four flavors of Herbal Tea Concentrate (to serve in each class) 4. Hot water, if possible 5. Cold water

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SECTION THREE: Getting Ready for Class

6. napkins 7. Honey 8. Stir sticks 9. Spoons 10. Cups 11. Lean-Protein estimator (SKU #6530) 12. Digital scale (Be sure it goes up to a high weight) 13. Digital camera (and extra camera batteries) 14. Herbalife tape measures (120 inches long) 15. Two-pocket folders printed with your main phone number for the class and the participant Weight Loss Challenge website address (HerbalifeWLC.com) 16. Raffle tickets 17. Giveaways for Weeks 2 through 12 (See “Giveaways” in this section of the manual) 18. Protein Bars Deluxe for sampling during Week 1 19. Basic Cellular nutrition product display consisting of Formula 1 Healthy Meal nutritional Shake Mix, Formula 2 Multivitamin Complex, Formula 3 Cell Activator®, Herbal Tea Concentrate, Cell-U-Loss® and Total Control® 20. Products on hand to sell, along with proper Herbalife PROMOTe! items (e.g., shaker cups, tablet boxes, measuring spoons and any other items you would like to include as part of a customer “care pack”) for any new customers 21. Copies of the Product Catalog 22. name tags …and, most of all, have a great positive attitude!

Setting Up Stations Set up the following four (4) stations, keeping flow in mind. note that the number of team members per station below are based on a class size of 20 participants. Of course, with a smaller class you might want to handle multiple stations yourself. Or for a larger class of 40, you may choose to have more team members at a particular station – enough to handle volume. •



registration table. (1 team member) The team member(s) at this station should be friendly and outgoing. Here, participants will: ❍ Sign in ❍ Pay their $35 participant fee and receive a receipt ❍ Be given a name tag ❍ Be directed to the Scale Station Scale Station. (1 team member) The team member(s) at this station should be upbeat and positive. Here, participants will: ❍ Weigh in on a scale ❍ Have their weight recorded in the “Weigh-Ins and Measures Weekly Record” ❍ Take their “Weigh-Ins and Measures Weekly Record” and proceed to the Measure Station W

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SECTION THREE: Getting Ready for Class

PREPARING FOR WEEK 1 AND BEYOND... (CONTINUED) Measure Station. (2 team members – 1 to measure; 1 to record measurements) Here, participants will: ❍ Have all their measurements taken ❍ Have their measurements recorded in the “Weigh-Ins and Measures Weekly Record” (which will be collected at this station) ❍ Be directed to the Photo Station photo Station. (1 team member) Here, participants will: ❍ Have their pictures taken ❍ Be directed to the Table Greeter





Assign the job of table greeter to one or more team members (again, the number depends on the size of your class). The Table Greeter helps participants find seats and asks them to help themselves to refreshments (such as Herbal Tea Concentrate). note: Display all served products in their original containers with the labels, so participants can check labels to be aware of what they are consuming. Special instructions for Scale and Measure Stations each week, participants will go to the Scale and Measure Stations before class begins to weigh in and be measured. The team members assigned to the Measure Station should familiarize themselves with the “Taking Good Measurements” diagram located in Appendix A at the back of this manual. Because some participants may be self-conscious about being weighed and measured in front of other people, both procedures should be done very discreetly. For this reason, when setting up the Scale and Measure Stations, keep participants’ privacy in mind. Separate these stations from the rest of the room by putting up long curtains or by setting up screens. You may also wish to put up signs so others will know not to enter. Lastly, since participants report to these two stations each week, it is important that you keep both of them in the same locations within the meeting room throughout the entire 12 weeks of the Challenge. This prevents confusion and helps the process run smoothly each time.

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SECTION THREE: Getting Ready for Class

Coaches Coaches are team members who teach the classes; they are also known as “trainers.” They should always have a good attitude and make the class fun! aSSigning coacheS Assign each participant a personal coach. If a participant was invited by a coach, that participant, along with anyone he or she brings, will be assigned to that same coach. Participants who answered an ad are divided among the coaches who paid for the ad. Again, people brought in by these participants will be assigned to the same coaches together. So, one coach may have two people assigned to them, while another coach may have more. (It depends on the luck of the draw!) weight-loSS SpreadSheet A spreadsheet that automatically calculates each participant’s percentage of weight loss for each week and for the entire 12-week course is available for download in the “Weight Loss Challenge” section on MyHerbalife.com (Tools & Training ➝ Business ➝ Business Methods ➝ Daily Methods of Operation (DMOs) ➝ Weight Loss Challenge). Assign one team member to be in charge of inputting this data each week. trainer oUtlineS Outlines for teaching the Week 1 and Week 2 classes are included in this manual. (See “Section Four: Outlines for Teaching Classes.”) handoUtS For Weeks 3 through 12, coaches will teach from the handout documents located in “Section Five: Weekly Topics and Participant Handouts” of this manual. These handouts are also available at the HerbalifeWLC.com website. each coach should be prepared to teach their class from the handouts for their respective weeks. The coaches teaching the following weeks will need to provide the following handouts in class for all participants: • Week 1 (“Protein”) – All handouts for this week • Week 2 (“Meal Plans, Snacking, Water”) ❍ “Quiz: Know Your Snacks” ❍ The three (3) different meal plans (Meal Plans “A”, “B” and “C”) • Week 5 (“nutrition Labels; Fats; Portion Control”) – “Quiz: Portion Distortion” • Week 6 (“Digestive Health”) – “Quiz: What Do You Know About Digestive Health?” • Week 7 (“Dining Out”) – “Quiz: The Ins and Outs of Dining Out”

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SECTION THREE: Getting Ready for Class

PREPARING FOR WEEK 1 AND BEYOND... (CONTINUED) teaching week 2 To determine which meal plan to give each participant, the coach teaching Week 2 (“Meal Plans, Snacking, Water”) will need to bring in a Lean-Protein estimator(s). (For more details, see “Trainer Outline for Week 1” in “Section Four: Outlines for Teaching Classes.”) teaching week 4 The coach teaching Week 4 (“Carbohydrates; Shopping and Cooking; Cellular nutrition”) will need to do the following for his/her class: • •

Bring in visuals of good carbohydrates, such as oatmeal, apples, cucumbers, a Formula 1 shake, etc. Bring samples of food labels to read (e.g., for single servings of peanut butter, ranch dressing, popcorn, etc.). Become familiar with the “Shortening Demo.” (MyHerbalife.com ➝ Tools & Training ➝ Business ➝ Business Methods ➝ Daily Methods of Operation (DMOs) ➝ Weight Loss Challenge)



claSS length Coaches should keep the total class time to 30 minutes maximum. (note: The first two classes will run longer due to registration in Week 1 and the assigning of meal plans in Week 2.)

Giveaways From Week 2 through Week 12, you will have giveaways of Herbalife® products. Beginning in Week 2, when a participant’s weigh-in shows that they have lost weight, give them a raffle ticket for the drawing that week, when they will have a chance to win one (1) giveaway of their choice. To prepare for the giveaways, do the following: Purchase Herbalife® products to be given away (e.g., Protein Bars Deluxe, Protein Drink Mix, Liftoff®, Herbal Aloe everyday Soothing Hand & Body Lotion, Radiant C® Face Quencher, etc.). How many will you need for the entire 12-week course? For a class of up to 9 people, draw one (1) giveaway per week (for a total of 12 products); for 10 to 19 people, draw two (2) giveaways per week (for a total of 24 products); and for 20 to 40 people, draw three (3) per week (36 products). Place one (1) product each in an attractive cellophane bag and tie with a ribbon. (You can buy the bags and ribbon at any local dollar store.) Have a festive gift bag or basket ready where raffle tickets will be placed and drawn.



• •

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SECTION THREE: Registration Handouts for Week 1

weigh-inS and MeaSUreS weekly record name: _____________________________________________ Week 1 (Starting Weight)

Date: _______ /________/ _________

Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 Week 6 Week 7 Week 8 Week 9 Week 10 Week 11 Week 12

Weight Weekly Weight Loss/Gain Total Weight Loss % Lost WeightGain Fee Paid Upper Chest

Chest

Waist

Hips

Right Thigh Left Thigh Right Arm Left Arm Total Inches Lost W

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SECTION THREE: Registration Handouts for Week 1

Weight Loss Challenge Participation Agreement Thank you for your interest in the Weight Loss Challenge! Through the Challenge, Herbalife Independent Distributors (also known as “coaches”) are able to help participants work toward their weight-loss goals and improve their overall wellness. We want you to have a great time as you have fun and meet new friends at our Weight Loss Challenge. Remember that any reasonable diet or weight-management program includes exercise and sensible meals, and it’s always a good idea to consult your primary physician before starting an exercise or weight-management program. The coach(es) responsible for this Challenge: name(s): __________________________________________________________________________________ Contact Information: ________________________________________________________________________ Please read this document carefully and sign it to confirm that you understand all of the general terms of the Weight Loss Challenge. •

In return for your Participation Fee of $35* and upon signing this document, you are entitled to participate in the Weight Loss Challenge identified below and you will be eligible for the various prizes and/or payouts which are awarded upon its conclusion. You will also attend weekly weigh-ins where you will have the opportunity to ask questions, receive coaching and education.



This Weight Loss Challenge begins the week of ________ /_______, 20____ and ends the week of ________ /______, 20____.



Coaches are independent businesspersons; they are solely and exclusively responsible for the operation and details of each Weight Loss Challenge.



The purchase or consumption of Herbalife® products in conjunction with your participation is recommended, but not required.



The Participation Fee of $35* covers all prize payouts, plus minimal operational costs.



The Weight-Gain Fee is $1* per pound for weight gained since the last recorded weigh-in.



The Absence Fee is $5* for each absence. One (1) absence is allowed without penalty.



The Participation Fee is fully refundable if requested by the participant within the first 48 hours of the Challenge start date.

*Amount is in U.S. dollars.

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SECTION THREE: Registration Handouts for Week 1



Weight-Loss Payouts are paid to the top 3 weight losers as follows: ❍

1st place: 50 percent will be paid to the person who has lost the greatest percentage of his/her body weight by the end of the Challenge.



2nd place: 30 percent will be paid to the person who has lost the next greatest percentage of his/her body weight by the end of the Challenge.



3rd place: 20 percent will be paid to the person who has lost the next greatest percentage of his/her body weight by the end of the Challenge.



An Inches Payout is paid to the participant who loses the most inches and is not also a top 3 weight loser; this winner receives all money collected from Weight-Gain and Absence Fees.



If, after reading this document, you have any further questions about the Weight Loss Challenge, do not hesitate to ask the coach(es) listed in this Agreement.



As a participant, you should communicate regularly and fully about your progress and never hesitate to ask questions, so you can receive the appropriate advice and coaching.



You must be at least 14 years of age to enter a Weight Loss Challenge; if you are 14 to 17 years old, your parent or legal guardian must sign this Agreement on the line provided.

I, ___________________________________________________ , have reviewed and agree to all of the above. ( PR I nT n AMe )

Signature: ________________________________________________________ Date: ______ /______ /______ Signature: ________________________________________________________ Date: ______ /______ /______ (Parent or legal guardian signature required if participant is under the age of 18.)

Address: _________________________________________________________________________________ City: ______________________________________________________ Zip: _______________ Phone: _________ - _________ - _______________ email: _________________________________________________________________________ How did you hear about this Challenge? (please check) ⇑ Prior participant

⇑ Referred by a friend (name): __________________________________________

⇑ newspaper ad

⇑ Postcard (color of postcard or name listed): ___________________________

⇑ Other: ________________________________________________________________________________ W

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SECTION THREE: Registration Handouts for Week 1

WEIGHT LOSS CHALLENGE FOOD/DRINK LOG name: ___________________________________________________ MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

Week of: _______________ FRIDAY

SATURDAY

Amount of water (in ounces) drank Amount (in grams) of protein eaten Number of calories consumed Amount of exercise (in minutes) – include type Food/Drink Log: Write down everything you eat and drink.

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SUNDAY

SECTION THREE: Registration Handouts for Week 1

WELCOME

We are pleased that you have accepted our invitation to join us for the Weight Loss Challenge, and we trust that the benefits of your participation will meet your expectations. We are excited that you have decided to make a positive change in your life. This is a 12-week program, and your attendance at the weekly meetings is key to learning important facts about proper nutrition and weight management. As part of our commitment to helping you lose those unwanted pounds and inches, each and every one of you will be assigned a personal coach who will monitor and guide you toward your goal. Your coach will be in touch with you prior to our next meeting in order to get acquainted and answer any questions you may have. We encourage you to get involved and join in our group discussions. Some of the various topics we will be discussing in the upcoming weeks are: • • • • • • • • •

Protein intake Calorie intake Digestive health Making sense of carbohydrates The importance of hydration Understanding fats Dining out exercise Heart health

For optimal results, we highly recommend you keep in regular contact with your coach throughout the Challenge.

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SECTION THREE: Registration Handouts for Week 1

REFERENCES

Many of the facts that will be talked about are referenced in the following books, DVDs and websites: BookS • Keep It Simple, Author: Luigi Gratton, M.D., M.P.H. • The L.A. Shape Diet, Author: David Heber, M.D., Ph.D. • What Color Is Your Diet?, Authors: David Heber, M.D., Ph.D., and Susan Bowerman, M.S., R.D., C.S.S.D. • NO More Heart Disease, Author: Lou Ignarro, Ph.D. dvdS • Digestive Health – This informative Herbalife DVD may be borrowed from your coach. • Personalize Your Program – An overview of all of Herbalife’s weight-management and nutrition products. This DVD may be borrowed from your coach. weBSiteS • Weight Loss Challenge (HerbalifeWLC.com) – Handouts for the weekly topics are available here. You can also check out inspiring success stories of past Weight Loss Challenge participants, and find more articles and recipes to help you live healthier. • Start Herbalife (StartHerbalife.com) – This website is a great resource where you can learn more about Herbalife® Weight Management, as well as Targeted nutrition, energy & Fitness and Personal Care | Outer nutrition, products.

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SECTION FOUR: Outlines for Teaching Classes

TRAINER OUTLINE FOR WEEK 1 Topic: Protein

1. welcoMe participantS Once all the participants are seated, welcome them to the Weight Loss Challenge. If you held a previous Challenge, let them know how much fun it was. Be enthusiastic at every class meeting. 2. tell yoUr own perSonal weight-loSS SUcceSS Story 3. paSS oUt regiStration MaterialS Distribute the handout folders containing all of the participant registration documents, which you had prepared in “Section Three: Getting Ready for Class.” (See “Before the First Class” located at the beginning of that section.) Read the “Weight Loss Challenge Participation Agreement” aloud, and ensure that everyone understands it. Have the participants fill out and sign the “Weight Loss Challenge Participation Agreement.” If anyone has been invited by someone, ask them to write down that person’s name in the “How did you hear about this Challenge?” area at the bottom of the agreement. 4. talk aBoUt the following iMportant thingS they’ll need to know: participants and coaches. Let the participants know that they will receive a call sometime during this first week from a personal coach they will be assigned to, so they should list two preferred times when their coaches may contact them to discuss their health goals. (Coaches may find the "Wellness Questionnaire" located in Appendix C helpful.) Let them know that they, the participants, are responsible for their own weight loss and that their coaches are available to help them; however, after Week 1, the participants themselves should contact their coaches with any questions or concerns. Ask participants to hand in their completed and signed agreement. participant standings. Inform participants that, upon their request, you will let them know their standings at any time during the Challenge; however, explain that you may not reveal anyone else’s standings. each participant’s weekly Weigh-Ins and Measures results are absolutely confidential. “whys.” each participant joined the Challenge for a reason. In other words, each of them has a “why” for being there – some for the support and to have someone to be accountable to; some to get healthier; and some, just because it sounded like so much fun! emphasize that each and every one of them is a winner just for being part of the Challenge. Ask them to write down their “why,” and have them keep this in their folders. Tell them to be sure to share this with W

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SECTION FOUR: Outlines for Teaching Classes

TRAINER OUTLINE FOR WEEK 1 Topic: Protein (CONTINUED)

their personal coach during the coach’s initial call that week. explain that this will help keep them on track for the next 12 weeks. class length. Let participants know that you realize everyone is busy, which is the reason each class meeting will be approximately 30 minutes long (45 minutes maximum). To respect participants’ time, it is very important you adhere to this. Let them know, however, that they should expect the meetings for Weeks 1 and 2 to run longer due to the initial Weigh-Ins and Measures in Week 1, and the assigning of meal plans in Week 2. weigh-ins and Measures. Fifteen (15) minutes prior to the start of each class, participants will weigh in and be measured. If the class starts at 6:15 p.m., advise everyone to arrive around 6 p.m. to be weighed. The classes themselves will consist of 20 to 30 minutes of information for healthy living. Out of respect for those who show up on time, do not wait for people to arrive after the scheduled start time. Always begin and end your classes promptly. 5. review the week 1 handoUtS Go over each of the Week 1 handouts in the following order: • welcome letter • references list. Point out that the Herbalife Weight Loss Challenge website (HerbalifeWLC.com) is where they will find the handout documents for each week’s class. Let them know that they are responsible for printing out their handouts from the website before each class. Ask if any participants do not have Internet access and may not be able to print their handouts; make note of their names. The coach assigned to teach a particular week should provide hard copies of the respective handouts for those participants. • weight loss challenge food/drink log. In this weekly log, participants will list anything they eat or drink. Tell them: “If they are biting, they are writing.” Be sure they bring a completed log back each week to hand in to their coach. • “protein 101” and “protein foods at-a-glance.” Protein is the topic for this first class meeting. Show them the “Protein Foods At-a-Glance” list. encourage participants to get their protein from a variety of sources. Ideally, protein intake should be roughly half animal sources (like meats, fish, poultry, egg whites, milk and milk products), with the remainder coming from plant sources, such as soy protein, tofu, edamame and other soy products, and other plant proteins such as beans, peas and lentils. Vegetarians can select their proteins from various plant sources; protein powders are one of the best ways to obtain high-quality protein for the fewest calories. nonvegetarians should still attempt to get about half of their protein from animal sources. Ask participants to raise their hands if they have ever had a protein bar; ask them how it tasted. Then 22

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SECTION FOUR: Outlines for Teaching Classes

give everyone a sample of the Herbalife® Protein Bar Deluxe. (Prepare samples by cutting the bars into bite-sized pieces to distribute among the participants.) 6. adviSe Meal planS Then talk about numbers for this week. Typically, women are advised to follow a 1,200-calorie meal plan with about 75 grams of protein per day; larger individuals may be able to lose on a higher calorie level. Most men lose weight quite well on a 1,500-calorie meal plan; larger individuals would use an 1,800-calorie meal plan. (See the Week 2 handouts for these three meal plans.) If an individual’s personalized meal plan is above or below the provided meal plans, they can add or subtract to the recommended daily calorie intake by using the “Food Lists for Meal Planning,” also in the Week 2 handouts. (note: It is not recommended that individuals follow a meal plan below 1,200 calories.) Another way of determining which meal plan would best suit an individual (apart from the rule of thumb just described) is by using a Lean-Protein estimator slide rule. (For more details, see the “Trainer Outline for Week 2” later in this section.) 7. introdUce the coacheS Tell participants that each of them will be assigned to a personal coach; explain what a coach does; and then introduce the coaches to the class. Have coaches very briefly share their own weight-loss success stories. 8. SUggeSt poSSiBle weight-ManageMent MethodS each participant is free to choose the way they will conduct their own weight loss. You might suggest they follow a method(s) the coaches themselves may have followed (e.g., exercising, giving up favorite foods for less than $3 a day, etc.). If they are deciding on a weight-management program and may be interested in Herbalife® products, announce that a short informational meeting about Herbalife weight-management programs will be held five (5) minutes after class ends, and that they are welcome to attend. (Be sure the break is no longer than five minutes.) Whether there may be other people remaining from the class, have one of the coaches start the meeting. (The coach presenting the Herbalife programs at this meeting should not be the same coach who conducted the Week 1 class.) In the informational meeting, go over the Quickstart program, Total Control® tablets, Cell-U-Loss® capsules and other weight-management products. ensure that any new customer(s) goes home with the proper PROMOTe! items. (See Item #20 on the “Supplies” list in “Section Three: Getting Ready for Class.”) W

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SECTION FOUR: Outlines for Teaching Classes

TRAINER OUTLINE FOR WEEK 2 Topic: Meal Plans, Snacking, Water

weigh-inS and MeaSUreS As participants begin arriving to weigh in and be measured before the class starts, welcome them back and give each one a name tag. Direct them to the Scale and Measure Stations. Weigh people as they come in. Remember to conduct Weigh-Ins and Measures as discreetly as possible. lean-protein eStiMator and Meal planS After participants have been weighed and measured, assign each participant one of the three meal plans (A, B or C) located in the Week 2 handouts. As explained earlier, women generally tend to lose weight on a 1,200-calorie meal plan (Meal Plan “A”), while men tend to do so on a 1,500-calorie meal plan (Meal Plan “B”). Using a Lean-Protein estimator (LPe) is another means of determining the best meal plan. The LPe is available as a slide rule, included as an item in the International Business Pack (IBP) or for individual purchase on MyHerbalife.com. You can also find it on MyHerbalife.com ➝ Tools & Training ➝ Resource Library ➝ Training Tools. If you use the slide rule, simply follow the directions on the LPe through to Step 6. If using the online LPe, enter the information requested on the form and click the “Calculate” button. For both the slide rule and the online LPe, the recommended meal plan will appear in the “Meal Plan for Weight Loss” window. (note: Meal Plan “C” covers individuals whose result is either “C” or “D.”) There are a couple of different ways to conduct the LPe activity. You may choose to set up a special station where participants can be directed after being weighed and measured; there, an assigned team member(s) will use the LPe to perform an individual reading for each participant. (For this option, you may want to handle the reading discreetly, since the same privacy issues may apply here as with the Weigh-Ins and Measures.) When a participant’s reading is done, the team member(s) at this station will direct them to the Tea Station, where they may help themselves to a cup of Herbal Tea Concentrate and then proceed to their seats. Another option is to conduct the LPe activity as an in-class project, in which each participant is given their own LPe slide rule and follows along as the coach “walks” them through the steps. new arrivalS If there are new participants who did not attend the Week 1 class, collect their $35 fee, have them weigh in, and ask them to wait after class in order to measure them and take their pictures. After class, go over the Week 1 handouts with them.

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SECTION FOUR: Outlines for Teaching Classes

Starting the claSS When all participants are seated and it is time to start the class, welcome everyone back. (Be enthusiastic!) Ask anyone who has lost weight to stand up. Count down amounts of weight lost. Recognize the top three people who have lost the greatest percentage of body weight, and have them state their amount of weight loss. Ask everyone whether they received a call from their personal coach. Make up a list of those who did not, and be sure that their coach is introduced to them. Remind participants that it is their responsibility to call their coach from this point forward. teach the week’S topicS Talk about determining meal plans, and then teach from the Week 2 handouts: “Lose a Pound a Week” article, the “Low-Calorie Snacks” list and the article “Water Works.” Give each participant a bottle of drinking water for your talk on water and hydration. Snacking qUiz One of the activities that participants enjoy is the “Quiz: Know Your Snacks.” Read each quiz question aloud, along with the three possible answer choices, and ask participants to circle their answer. Then read each possible answer aloud again, asking everyone who chose that answer to raise their hands; then reveal the correct answer. People are usually surprised by the answers, adding to the fun of this quiz! SaMpling You can give out pie samples made with Formula 1 Healthy Meal nutritional Shake Mix. Then explain that if anyone would like to learn more about how Herbalife’s nutrition products work, they may find the “Maximize Your Health With Cellular nutrition” handout interesting and helpful. (See “Products by Week” in Appendix B for additional sampling ideas.) ending the claSS Wish everyone a great week, and tell them you’ll “see less of them next time.” Remind new participants to stay after class to be measured and have their pictures taken.

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SECTION FIVE: Week 1: Protein

PROTEIN 101 By David Heber, M.D., Ph.D.

It seems everywhere we look someone is promoting a new diet that praises the power of protein. But whether you want to lose or gain weight, or maintain your current weight, the importance of protein goes far beyond physical appearance and muscle building. a neceSSity for every Body Protein is an important component of every cell in the body. It is an organic compound, composed of 22 amino acids, otherwise known as the building blocks of life. Protein is stored in muscles and organs, and the body utilizes it to build and repair tissues, as well as for the production of enzymes and hormones. Protein also makes it possible for blood to carry oxygen throughout the body. Along with fat and carbohydrates, protein is a “macronutrient,” meaning the body needs relatively large amounts of it. The Institute of Medicine of the national Academy of Sciences has concluded that our daily protein requirements should be 10 percent to 35 percent of our total caloric intake, with men needing slightly more than women. A lack of protein can cause loss of muscle mass, decreased immunity, as well as weakening of the heart and respiratory system. how protein affectS yoUr weight The widespread popularity of high-protein diets is due in large part to their ability to help manage hunger. When protein is absorbed, it sends a signal to the brain to decrease your hunger. Another benefit of protein is that it raises your resting metabolism by maintaining muscle mass. As we age, muscle mass decreases without exercise, so staying fit is a key to burning fat by keeping your metabolism high. Protein also leads to a much less rapid rise and fall of blood sugar and insulin, so you avoid the “sugar highs and lows” after eating sweets without adequate protein. Certain foods, however, provide a healthier resource for protein than others. conSider the SoUrce You can obtain healthy sources of protein without high levels of saturated fat. For example, soybeans, nuts and whole grains provide protein without much saturated fat and offer plenty of healthful fiber and micronutrients as well. If you’re looking for yet another great way to obtain healthy protein, vegetable sources of protein found in Herbalife® Formula 1 shakes are high quality and have lower calorie levels with virtually no added fat. Herbalife® products personalize your daily protein intake to match your body’s needs. With a variety of shakes and snacks, Herbalife’s weight-management program helps you build or maintain lean muscle while providing healthy weight-management support. now that you’ve increased your knowledge of protein, you can effectively enhance your diet and allow good health to take shape.

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SECTION FIVE: Week 1: Protein

PROTEIN FOODS AT-A-GLANCE

The following is a list of foods and their protein content in grams: dairy prodUctS • egg whites: 7 whites = 25 grams • Cottage cheese (nonfat): 1 cup = 28 grams • Mozzarella cheese (nonfat): one 1-ounce stick = 8 grams • Yogurt (nonfat, sugar-free): one 6-ounce carton = 5 grams • Yogurt (nonfat, plain): 1 cup = 14 grams • Milk (nonfat): 1 cup = 10 grams MeatS • Beef (lean): 3 ounces (cooked weight) = 25 grams • Chicken breast: 3 ounces (cooked weight) = 25 grams • Turkey breast: 3 ounces (cooked weight) = 25 grams • Turkey ham: 4 ounces (cooked weight) = 18 grams • Pork tenderloin: 3 ounces (cooked weight) = 24 grams fiSh • • • •

Ocean-caught fish: 4 ounces (cooked weight) = 25 to 31 grams Shrimp, crab, lobster: 4 ounces (cooked weight) = 22 to 24 grams Tuna: 4 ounces (water packed) = 27 grams Scallops: 4 ounces (cooked weight) = 25 grams

BeanS, lentilS and grainS • Beans (black, pinto, etc.): ½ cup (cooked) = 7 grams • Lentils: ½ cup (cooked) = 9 grams • Quinoa: ½ cup (cooked) = 6 grams • Tofu: ¼ block = 7 grams • Veggie burger: one burger = 5 to 20 grams (varies by brand) note: Some ready-to-eat cereals are also good protein sources. Check labels – some have more than 10 grams of protein per serving. herBalife foodS • Formula 1 shake (with 8 fl. oz. nonfat milk): one serving = 18 grams • Soup Mix (with 6 to 8 fl. oz. of water): one serving = 16 grams • Protein Drink Mix (with 6 to 8 fl. oz. water): one serving = 15 grams • Beverage Mix (with 6 to 8 fl. oz. water): one serving = 15 grams • Protein Bar: one bar (1.23 ounces) = 12 grams • Protein Bar Deluxe: one bar (1.41 ounces) = 10 grams

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SECTION FIVE: Week 2: Meal Plans, Snacking, Water

MEAL PLAN “A” 1,200 Calories BreakfaSt: 1 herBalife ® forMUla 1 Shake + 1 frUit example: ● 2 scoops Formula 1 nutritional Shake Mix + 8 fl. oz. nonfat milk or soymilk + one half of a fresh mango OR:

1 protein Unit + 1 frUit examples: ● 7 egg whites (hard boiled or cooked with pan spray as an omelet) + ½ grapefruit OR: • 1 cup nonfat cottage cheese + 1 cup pineapple

lUnch:

1 herBalife ® forMUla 1 Shake + 1 frUit example: ● 2 scoops Formula 1 nutritional Shake Mix + 8 fl. oz. nonfat milk or soymilk + 1 cup strawberries OR:

1 protein Unit + 2 vegetaBleS + Salad + 1 frUit example: ● 3 ounces roasted chicken breast ❍ AnD 2 cups steamed broccoli ❍ AnD 4 cups of salad greens with seasoned vinegar ❍ AnD 1 large orange

p.M. Snack:

1 protein Snack + 1 frUit example: ● Herbalife® Protein Bar Deluxe + 1 medium apple

dinner:

2 protein UnitS + 2 vegetaBleS + Salad + 1 grain + 1 frUit example: ● 8 ounces broiled fish with teriyaki sauce ❍ AnD 1 cup steamed spinach + 1 cup steamed carrots ❍ AnD mixed green salad ❍ AnD ½ cup brown rice ❍ AnD 1 cup mixed honeydew and cantaloupe cubes

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SECTION FIVE: Week 2: Meal Plans, Snacking, Water

MEAL PLAN “B” 1,500 Calories BreakfaSt: 1 herBalife ® forMUla 1 Shake + 1 frUit example: ● 2 scoops Formula 1 nutritional Shake Mix + 8 fl. oz. nonfat milk or soymilk + one half of a fresh mango OR:

1 protein Unit + 1 frUit examples: ● 7 egg whites (hard boiled or cooked with pan spray as an omelet) + ½ grapefruit OR: • 1 cup nonfat cottage cheese + 1 cup pineapple

a.M. Snack: 1 protein Snack example: ● 1 Herbalife® Protein Bar Deluxe

lUnch:

1 herBalife ® forMUla 1 Shake + 1 frUit example: ● 2 scoops Formula 1 nutritional Shake Mix + 8 fl. oz. nonfat milk or soymilk + 1 cup strawberries OR:

2 protein UnitS + 2 vegetaBleS + Salad + 1 grain + 1 frUit example: ●

6 to 8 ounces roasted chicken or turkey breast, fish, tuna or shellfish AnD 2 cups steamed green beans AnD 4 cups of salad greens with light dressing AnD ½ cup brown rice AnD 1 large orange

❍ ❍ ❍ ❍

p.M. Snack:

1 protein Snack + 1 frUit example: ● Herbalife® Protein Bar Deluxe + 1 medium apple

dinner:

2 protein UnitS + 2 vegetaBleS + Salad + 1 grain + 1 frUit example: ● 6 to 8 ounces broiled fish with teriyaki sauce ❍ AnD 1 cup steamed spinach + 1 cup steamed carrots ❍ AnD tossed green salad with light dressing ❍ AnD ½ cup brown rice ❍ AnD 1 cup mixed melon cubes

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SECTION FIVE: Week 2: Meal Plans, Snacking, Water

MEAL PLAN “C” 1,800 Calories BREAKFAST: 1 HERBALIFE ® FORMULA 1 SHAKE + 1 FRUIT Example: ● 2 scoops Formula 1 Nutritional Shake Mix + 8 fl. oz. nonfat milk or soymilk + one half of a fresh mango OR:

1 PROTEIN UNIT + 1 GRAIN + 1 FRUIT Examples: ● 7 egg whites (hard boiled or cooked with pan spray as an omelet) + ½ whole-grain English muffin + ½ grapefruit OR: • 1 cup nonfat cottage cheese + 1 fat-free whole-grain waffle + 1 cup pineapple

A.M. SNACK: 1 PROTEIN SNACK + 1 FRUIT Example: ●

LUNCH:

1 Herbalife® Protein Bar Deluxe + 1 medium apple

1 HERBALIFE ® FORMULA 1 SHAKE + 1 FRUIT Example: ● 2 scoops Formula 1 Nutritional Shake Mix + 8 fl. oz. nonfat milk or soymilk + 1 cup strawberries OR:

2 PROTEIN UNITS + 2 VEGETABLES + SALAD + 1 GRAIN + 1 FRUIT Example: ● 3 ounces chicken or turkey breast, fish, tuna or shellfish on one slice of whole-grain bread ❍ AND 1 cup chopped vegetables ❍ AND 1 cup tomato juice ❍ AND 4 cups of salad greens ❍ AND 1 large orange

P.M. SNACK:

1 PROTEIN SNACK + 1 FRUIT Examples: ● Herbalife® Protein Bar Deluxe + 1 medium apple

DINNER:

2 PROTEIN UNITS + 2 VEGETABLES + SALAD + 1 GRAIN + 1 FRUIT Example: ● 6 to 8 ounces broiled fish with teriyaki sauce ❍ AND 1 cup steamed spinach + 1 cup steamed carrots ❍ AND tossed green salad with light dressing ❍ AND 1 cup whole-grain pasta ❍ AND 1 cup watermelon

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SECTION FIVE: Week 2: Meal Plans, Snacking, Water

FOOD LISTS FOR MEAL PLANNING Protein Foods FOOD ITEM

ONE UNIT

CALORIES

PROTEIN (GRAMS)

Egg whites

7 whites

115

25

Cottage cheese, nonfat

1 cup

140

28

Herbalife® Formula 1 Nutritional Shake Mix + nonfat milk

2 scoops Formula 1 Nutritional Shake Mix + 1 cup nonfat milk

180

18

Beef, lean

3 ounces, cooked weight

145–160

25

Chicken breast

3 ounces, cooked weight

140

25

turkey breast

3 ounces, cooked weight

135

25

turkey ham

4 ounces, cooked weight

135

18

Ocean-caught fish

4 ounces, cooked weight

130–170

25–31

Shrimp, crab, lobster

4 ounces, cooked weight

120

22–24

tuna

4 ounces, water packed

145

27

Scallops

4 ounces, cooked weight

135

25

Soy Canadian bacon

4 slices

80

21 (varies)

Soy hot dog

2 links

110

22 (varies)

Soy ground round

¾ cup

120

24

Soy burgers

2 patties

160

26

tofu, firm

½ cup

180

20 (varies)

VEGETARIAN

Note: Calorie average is 135 calories per unit.

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SECTION FIVE: Week 2: Meal Plans, Snacking, Water

Fruits food iteM

one Unit

calorieS

fiBer (graMS)

Apple

1 medium

75

3

Apricots

3 whole

50

3

Avocado

¼ average fruit

80

2

Banana

1 small

100

3

Blackberries

1 cup

75

8

Blueberries

1 cup

110

5

Cantaloupe

1 cup

55

1

Cherries

20

80

2

Grapes

1 cup

115

2

Grapefruit

½ fruit

40

2

Honeydew melon

1 cup

60

1

Kiwi

1 large

55

3

Mango

½ large

80

3

nectarine

1 large

70

2

Orange

1 large

85

4

Papaya

½ large

75

3

Peach

1 large

70

3

Pear

1 medium

100

4

Pineapple

1 cup

75

2

Plums

2 small

70

2

Strawberries

1 cup

50

4

Tangerine

1 medium

45

3

Watermelon

1 cup

50

1

note: Calorie average is 76 calories per unit.

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SECTION FIVE: Week 2: Meal Plans, Snacking, Water

Cooked Vegetables food iteM

one Unit

calorieS

fiBer (graMS)

Acorn squash, baked

1 cup

85

6

Artichoke

1 medium

60

6

Asparagus

1 cup

45

4

Beets

1 cup

75

3

Broccoli

1 cup

45

5

Brussels sprouts

1 cup

60

4

Cabbage

1 cup

35

4

Carrots

1 cup

70

5

Cauliflower

1 cup

30

3

Celery

1 cup

20

2

Chinese cabbage

1 cup

20

3

Collard greens

1 cup

50

5

Corn

1 ear

75

2

eggplant

1 cup

30

3

Green beans

1 cup

45

4

Green peas

1 cup

140

8

Kale

1 cup

35

3

Leeks

1 cup

30

1

Mushrooms

1 cup

40

3

Mustard greens

1 cup

20

3

Onion

1 cup

105

4

Pumpkin

1 cup

50

3

Red cabbage

1 cup

30

3

Spinach

1 cup

40

4

Sweet potato

1 cup

200

4

Swiss chard

1 cup

20

2

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SECTION FIVE: Week 2: Meal Plans, Snacking, Water

Cooked Vegetables (continued) food iteM

one Unit

calorieS

fiBer (graMS)

Tomato juice

1 cup

40

1

Tomato sauce/puree

1 cup

100

5

Tomato soup, made with water

1 cup

85

0

Tomato vegetable juice

1 cup

45

2

Tomatoes

1 cup

70

3

Turnip greens

1 cup

30

5

Winter squash, baked

1 cup

70

7

Zucchini with skin

1 cup

30

3

note: Calorie average is 56 calories per unit.

Raw Vegetables food iteM

one Unit

calorieS

fiBer (graMS)

Cabbage

1 cup

20

2

Carrots

1 cup

50

4

Cucumber

1 cup

15

1

endive

1 cup

10

2

Pepper, green

1 cup

30

2

Peppers, red

1 cup

30

2

Pepper, yellow

1 cup

30

2

Romaine lettuce

1 cup

10

1

Spinach

1 cup

10

1

Tomatoes

1 cup

40

2

note: Calorie average is 25 calories per unit.

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SECTION FIVE: Week 2: Meal Plans, Snacking, Water

Starches and Grains Starch/grain

Serving Size calorieS fiBer (graMS) protein (graMS)

Beans (black, pinto, etc.)

½ cup, cooked

115–140

5–7

7

Bread (whole grain preferred)

1 slice

80–100

3

3–5

english muffin

½ muffin

80

1

2

Lentils

½ cup, cooked

115

8

9

Pasta (whole grain preferred)

½ cup, cooked

85

2

3

Potato, baked

½ medium

100

Rice (brown preferred)

½ cup, cooked

110

2

3

Rice cakes

2 large

70

1

1

Tortilla, corn

2 tortillas

120

4

2

Bran flakes

¾ cup

100

3

5

Oatmeal, cooked

1 cup

130

4

6

Shredded wheat, bite size

¾ cup

115

3

4

cereals

note: Calorie average is 100 calories per serving.

Taste Enhancers food iteM

Serving Size calorieS fiBer (graMS)

Cheese, Parmesan

3 tablespoons

Cheese, reduced fat

fat (graMS)

80

0

5

1 ounce

50–80

0

2–5

nuts

½ ounce

80–100

0

6–11

Olive oil

1 teaspoon

40

0

4

Olives

10 large

50

0

7

Pine nuts, sesame seeds

1 tablespoon

50

1

4 -7

40 –80

0

0–2

Salad dressing, fat-free or low-fat 2 tablespoons note: Calorie average is 65 calories per serving.

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SECTION FIVE: Week 2: Meal Plans, Snacking, Water

Protein Snacks food iteM

Serving Size

calorieS

protein (graMS)

Cheese, mozzarella, low-fat

1 ounce (1 stick)

70

8

Cottage cheese, nonfat

½ cup

70

14

egg, hard boiled

1

80

4

Herbalife® Protein Bar Deluxe

1 bar

140

10

Herbalife® Beverage Mix, Peach Mango or Wild Berry

2 scoops

70

15

Herbalife® Protein Drink Mix

2 scoops in water

110

15

70

15

90–110

9

Soup, tomato, made with nonfat milk 1 cup

120

6

Soy crisps

1 ounce (about 17 crisps)

110

7

Yogurt, nonfat, sugar-free

1 six-ounce carton

100

5

Herbalife® Soup Mix, Creamy Chicken 1 packet Milk, nonfat or 1%

1 cup

note: Calorie average is 100 calories per serving.

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SECTION FIVE: Week 2: Meal Plans, Snacking, Water

LOSE A POUND A WEEK

If you cut 500 calories a day from your typical intake, you will lose a pound in a week’s time. Look at some of the examples below. The more you cut, the more you lose! EXAMPLE 1: an herbalife ® formula 1 shake for breakfast vs. a blueberry muffin and a medium vanilla frappuccino food calorieS fat (graMS) Muffin and medium frappuccino 930 33 Formula 1 shake with nonfat milk 180 1.5 You save: 750 calories and 31.5 grams of fat. If you typically have “just a muffin and coffee” every day for breakfast, you could lose 1½ pounds a week just by making this one swap! EXAMPLE 2: chicken breast vs. red meat food 6 oz. lean sirloin steak 3 oz. chicken breast You save: 510 calories and 25 grams of fat

calorieS 660 150

fat (graMS) 29 4

EXAMPLE 3: roast beef sandwich with cheese and mayonnaise vs. turkey sandwich with vegetables and mustard food Roast beef sandwich + cheese, mayo Turkey sandwich + vegetables, mustard You save: 500 calories and 25 grams of fat

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SECTION FIVE: Week 2: Meal Plans, Snacking, Water

LOSE A POUND A WEEK

(CONTINUED)

EXAMPLE 4: french fries vs. Steamed vegetables food 35 French fries 1 cup zucchini + 1 tablespoon Parmesan cheese You save: 500 calories and 26 grams of fat

calorieS 560 60

fat (graMS) 28 2

EXAMPLE 5: large restaurant chinese chicken salad with fried noodles vs. 3 cups salad greens with 1 cup mixed fresh vegetables, 3 ounces grilled chicken breast and 2 tablespoons light salad dressing food calorieS Chinese chicken salad Up to 1000 Greens/vegetables/chicken + light dressing 320 You save: up to 680 calories and 50 grams of fat each time you make this choice

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SECTION FIVE: Week 2: Meal Plans, Snacking, Water

LOW-CALORIE SNACKS

Snacking doesn’t have to be an unhealthy habit. It’s not unusual to get hungry between meals – particularly if you have a long stretch in between. The key is planning ahead to make sure you have some healthy foods available, and ideally, you should combine some protein with a little carbohydrate to fill you up and keep you going. A protein-enriched beverage, a piece of string cheese and a piece of fruit, or a small carton of yogurt with a few low-fat crackers should do the trick. here are SoMe Snack ideaS – all Under 100 calorieS: •

nonfat latte made with nonfat milk or soy milk



Mini pita bread with a quarter of an avocado



Herbalife® Soup Mix, Creamy Chicken



Herbalife® Beverage Mix, Peach Mango or Wild Berry



Two rice cakes with one wedge light cheese



One 100-calorie pudding cup



½ cup nonfat cottage cheese with ½ cup blueberries



1 ounce turkey jerky with one slice rye cracker



One individual carton light nonfat yogurt with 1 tablespoon raisins



Toasted whole-grain waffle with a sprinkle of cinnamon-sugar



One stick mozzarella cheese with one sesame breadstick



¾ cup tomato soup made with nonfat milk



Three hard-cooked egg whites mashed with a little Dijon mustard and a sliced tomato



15 baby carrots with 2 tablespoons fat-free ranch dressing



12 ounces tomato juice



10 soy crisps with a small peach



One frozen fruit bar



1 cup whole strawberries with 1 tablespoon chocolate syrup

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SECTION FIVE: Week 2: Meal Plans, Snacking, Water

QUIZ: KNOW YOUR SNACKS

How much do you know about snacking habits? Snacking can be a healthy habit if you choose the right items and eat the right balance of foods for snacks to keep your energy level up. Unfortunately, many times we wait until we get the “snack attack,” and don’t choose as wisely as we should. Here are some questions to test how much you know about snacking. 1. what is america’s favorite snack food, and how much of it do we eat every year? a. b. c. d.

Pretzels, and we eat about 50 million pounds Peanuts, and we eat about 25 million pounds Cookies, and we eat about 700 million pounds Potato chips, and we eat about 1.2 billion pounds

2. what does the shape of the original pretzel twist represent? a. b. c. d.

A child’s playground game, similar to hopscotch A mother’s arms holding a baby A person’s arms crossed in prayer The coat of arms of the Hapsburg family in Germany, for whom the pretzel was invented

3. you are really craving something sweet. you run into the local food mart and find an array of pre-packaged goodies. which of the following would have the fewest calories? a. b. c. d.

A package of two frosted cupcakes A package of two crème-filled spongecakes A single-serve apple pie A single-serve pack of four powdered-sugar donuts

4. popcorn can be a healthy snack, but you need to choose carefully. which of the following popcorns have the MoSt calories per cup? a. b. c. d.

Cheese flavored Kettle-corn flavored Cinnamon-butter flavored extra-butter flavored

5. rice cakes can be the start of a healthy snack. the plain ones have only about 35 calories. to keep calories down, which of the following would be the best topping for your rice cake? a. b. c. d.

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1 tablespoon of cream cheese 2 tablespoons of ricotta cheese and a sprinkle of cinnamon sugar 1 tablespoon of strawberry jam 1 tablespoon of peanut butter

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SECTION FIVE: Week 2: Meal Plans, Snacking, Water

6. you are craving something smooth and creamy. which of the following choices has the fewest calories? a. b. c. d.

A single-serve rice pudding A single-serve chocolate pudding One 6-ounce carton fruit-on-the-bottom yogurt Half a banana with a tablespoon of chocolate syrup

7. you’re rummaging around the house for something to eat. you have the following available to you, and you can’t decide which would do the least damage to your diet, calorie-wise. which one should you choose? a. b. c. d.

Four fig bars Three graham-cracker sheets 50 pistachio nuts 2 ounces of beef jerky

8. you have several leftovers in your refrigerator that look tempting for a snack. which of the following will use up the fewest calories from your calorie budget? a. b. c. d.

A piece of lasagna, about 3 inches square Two fried-chicken drumsticks 1 cup of homemade macaroni and cheese 1 cup of shrimp fried rice

9. Sometimes when we think we’re hungry, we’re really just thirsty. if you think something to drink might help quench your thirst and your hunger pangs, which would be the best choice? a. b. c. d.

12 ounces of lemonade 12 ounces of cranberry juice 12 ounces of grapefruit juice 12 ounces of canned mango nectar

10. after an afternoon of shopping and with more to buy, you need a little something to get you through the afternoon. what’s the best choice from the mall? a. b. c. d.

One large soft pretzel One medium-sized fruit smoothie 1 cup of low-fat frozen yogurt A cup of chicken noodle soup from the deli

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SECTION FIVE: Week 2: Meal Plans, Snacking, Water

ANSWER KEY: KNOW YOUR SNACKS

1. what is america’s favorite snack food, and how much of it do we eat every year? a. b. c. d.

Pretzels, and we eat about 50 million pounds Peanuts, and we eat about 25 million pounds Cookies, and we eat about 700 million pounds Potato chips, and we eat about 1.2 billion pounds

2. what does the shape of the original pretzel twist represent? a. b. c. d.

A child’s playground game, similar to hopscotch A mother’s arms holding a baby A person’s arms crossed in prayer The coat of arms of the Hapsburg family in Germany, for whom the pretzel was invented

3. you are really craving something sweet. you run into the local food mart and find an array of pre-packaged goodies. which of the following would have the fewest calories? a. b. c. d.

A package of two frosted cupcakes A package of two crème-filled spongecakes A single-serve apple pie A single-serve pack of four powdered-sugar donuts

The donuts have 238 calories; the spongecakes have 300, the pie has 480 and the cupcakes have 360. 4. popcorn can be a healthy snack, but you need to choose carefully. which of the following popcorns have the MoSt calories per cup? a. b. c. d.

Cheese flavored Kettle-corn flavored Cinnamon-butter flavored extra-butter flavored

Cheese-flavored popcorn averages a whopping 58 calories a cup. Cinnamon-butter flavored comes in next, at 50 calories. Kettle-corn and extra-butter flavored are both about 35 calories a cup. Natural-style and air-popped popcorn have the fewest calories – about 30 calories per cup. 5. rice cakes can be the start of a healthy snack. the plain ones have only about 35 calories. to keep calories down, which of the following would be the best topping for your rice cake? a. b. c. d.

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1 tablespoon of cream cheese 2 tablespoons of ricotta cheese and a sprinkle of cinnamon sugar 1 tablespoon of strawberry jam 1 tablespoon of peanut butter

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SECTION FIVE: Week 2: Meal Plans, Snacking, Water

Regular cream cheese has about 50 calories a tablespoon, as does the strawberry jam. A tablespoon of peanut butter has 95 calories. The ricotta cheese is a calorie bargain, with 2 tablespoons having only about 25 calories. Spread some on a rice cake with a little cinnamon sugar for a tasty treat. 6. you are craving something smooth and creamy. which of the following choices has the fewest calories? a. b. c. d.

A single-serve rice pudding A single-serve chocolate pudding One 6-ounce carton fruit-on-the-bottom yogurt Half a banana with a tablespoon of chocolate syrup

Some yogurts are healthy, and if this had been a “light” version, it would have been the best choice. But low-fat yogurts with fruit on the bottom can have 150 or more calories per individual carton. Rice pudding and chocolate pudding have about 130 to 140 calories per serving, depending on the brand. But a half of banana has only about 45 calories, and the syrup adds about 50 – under 100 calories for a delicious treat (even better if the banana is frozen). 7. you’re rummaging around the house for something to eat. you have the following available to you, and you can’t decide which would do the least damage to your diet, calorie-wise. which one should you choose? a. b. c. d.

Four fig bars Three graham-cracker sheets 50 pistachio nuts 2 ounces of beef jerky

The pistachio nuts have about 160 calories; the fig bars add up to 220 calories, the graham crackers would have about 180 calories, and the beef jerky is about 230 calories. If you get the pistachio nuts in the shell, that’s even better – it takes time to crack each one open, and it will slow down the rate at which you eat. 8. you have several leftovers in your refrigerator that look tempting for a snack. which of the following will use up the fewest calories from your calorie budget? a. b. c. d.

A piece of lasagna, about 3 inches square Two fried-chicken drumsticks 1 cup of homemade macaroni and cheese 1 cup of shrimp fried rice

Believe it or not, the two fried-chicken drumsticks, even though they are fried, have the fewest calories – about 250 for the two drumsticks. If you take off the breaded coating, you still get the flavor of the chicken and can save yourself about 75 more calories. All the other selections have between 400 to 500 calories each – way too much for most people as just a snack. W

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SECTION FIVE: Week 2: Meal Plans, Snacking, Water

ANSWER KEY: KNOW YOUR SNACKS (CONTINUED)

9. Sometimes when we think we’re hungry, we’re really just thirsty. if you think something to drink might help quench your thirst and your hunger pangs, which would be the best choice? a. b. c. d.

12 ounces of lemonade 12 ounces of cranberry juice 12 ounces of grapefruit juice 12 ounces of canned mango nectar

Of the four choices, grapefruit juice has the fewest calories per ounce. Twelve ounces of grapefruit juice has about 150 calories; all the others have about 200 calories in a 12 oz. serving because they all have added sugar. Better yet, when you are thirsty, try mineral water with just a few tablespoons of juice. It’s refreshing and tasty, but you will minimize calories considerably. 10. after an afternoon of shopping and with more to buy, you need a little something to get you through the afternoon. what’s the best choice from the mall? a. b. c. d.

One large soft pretzel One medium-sized fruit smoothie 1 cup of low-fat frozen yogurt A cup of chicken noodle soup from the deli

The chicken noodle soup is the clear winner here, at only 175 calories for a cup. The large pretzels from the mall can be as much as 400 calories each; a cup of frozen low-fat yogurt will cost you about 280 calories; and the medium smoothie – which has fruit and frozen yogurt and added sugar – could be 400 calories or more.

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SECTION FIVE: Week 2: Meal Plans, Snacking, Water

WATER WORKS

Drinking plenty of water is an important part of maintaining a healthy weight and a nutritious diet. Water plays an essential role in helping your body process nutrients, maintain normal circulation and keep the proper balance of fluids. replace what yoU loSe After each 30-minute workout, drink two 8 oz. glasses of water to replenish your fluids. If you find you become thirsty while working out, consider using a sports bottle to help you stay hydrated while you exercise. Because of their calorie content, soft drinks and fruit juices are not good choices for replacing lost fluids if you are trying to lose weight or manage your weight. You might try adding just a splash of fruit juice or a slice of lemon or lime to a glass of water if you don’t like the taste of plain water. how MUch water iS enoUgh? As a general guideline, try to drink six to eight 8 oz. glasses of water a day. If you exercise, you will probably need to drink more to replenish the water lost through sweating. You can usually trust your sense of thirst to let you know when you need to drink. Your sense of thirst, combined with simply paying attention to how many glasses of water you’ve had in a day, can help you to keep your body hydrated. when water iSn’t enoUgh The next time you’re thirsty, it could be smart to think before you drink. While “you are what you eat,” the phrase is more accurately “you are what you drink.” Our bodies are about 60 percent water, and while watery foods can help meet our needs, most of our daily water needs are met from the fluids we drink. Aside from plain water, consumers are faced with a dizzying array of juices, juice drinks, vitamin-fortified waters, sports drinks, energy drinks and teas – making it difficult to choose the best beverage to help meet fluid needs. For the average person who exercises moderately, plain water is a perfectly good choice. But many people prefer drinks with a little flavor, and tastier fluids may encourage consumption. And as exercise duration and intensity increase, it’s important to not only replace fluid losses, but to replace body salts – such as sodium and potassium – that are lost with sweating.

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SECTION FIVE: Week 2: Meal Plans, Snacking, Water

WATER WORKS (CONTINUED)

look Before yoU drink When evaluating beverages, a good place to start is by reading the nutrition facts label. For instance, sodas or fruit drinks are often high in calories and sugar, and low on nutrients. not only can these empty calories pile on the pounds, the high-sugar concentration in sodas and fruit drinks can actually slow down the rate at which the body absorbs fluid. If you see high-fructose corn syrup at the top of the ingredient list, you may want to pass. Sugars other than fructose, in lower concentrations, are much better absorbed. Some energy drinks have a combination of caffeine and sugar, designed to give you a quick spike in energy. But if you aren’t used to consuming caffeinated drinks, these could make you jittery or upset your stomach. So what should you look for? It’s a good idea to check labels for electrolytes, such as sodium and potassium, which are salts that your body loses when you perspire. In addition to replacing losses, electrolytes can also add some flavor, which will encourage you to drink more. Also, look for drinks with less than 100 calories per 8 oz. serving. Higher calories means a higher sugar concentration; you also don’t want to drink back the calories you just burned on the treadmill. While too much sugar can be a problem, a little bit of carbohydrate in beverages can help to maintain blood sugar while you are exercising. Also, a mixture of several forms of carbohydrate in the drink helps to get carbohydrate into working muscle better than just one carbohydrate source. A drink such as one made with Herbalife® H3O® Fitness Drink mix could be a good choice because it contains the right amount of readily absorbed carbohydrates, no caffeine, and the essential electrolytes people lose when they perspire. It comes in a powder that mixes easily with water, and is available either in a canister or in convenient single-serve “stick packs” that can be thrown in a bag or pocket and mixed in any water bottle.

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SECTION FIVE: Week 2: Meal Plans, Snacking, Water

Staying hydrated You may become dehydrated before you are actually thirsty. This is one reason that athletes learn to drink on schedule. Two cups of fluid a couple of hours before you start exercising should be followed with another cup or so 10 to 20 minutes before you start. A few ounces every 15 minutes or so when you are working out can help prevent excessive fluid losses. One way to monitor your hydration is to note the color of your urine. “People who are optimally hydrated should urinate every one to two hours,” says Luigi Gratton, M.D., M.P.H., clinical physician at the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA)*. “And your urine should be pale yellow or clear,” says Gratton. “Darker color usually means more concentrated urine, an indication that you should increase your fluid intake.” Watch for other signs and symptoms of dehydration during exercise, such as muscle cramping, or feeling light-headed or faint. even if you’re only a weekend warrior, adequate fluids are important for a healthy, well-functioning body. If you think you drink less than you should, a flavorful beverage designed to help you hydrate might be just the thing to help meet your fluid needs.

*Titles are for identification purposes only. The University of California does not endorse specific products or services as a matter of policy.

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SECTION FIVE: Week 3: Metabolism

REV UP YOUR METABOLISM

Put your metabolism to work for you. now’s the perfect time to incorporate some metabolic-revving tips into your daily regimen and avoid gaining weight. rev Up yoUr Body’S engine We eat food for fuel. When we burn it for energy to run our bodies, the process creates heat. nutritional supplements can assist the body’s engine to burn fuel efficiently, helping our metabolism stay revved and functioning well. daily regiMen tipS Keep your metabolism revved with these tips: • engage in 30 minutes of activity every day to help minimize weight gain and to raise metabolic rate. • Tone your muscles by weight training three days a week. • Start small – try walking with one- to two-pound weights. • Do not eat fewer than 1,200 calories a day. eating too little may slow your metabolism. • never skip breakfast. It may slow down your metabolism. • nutritional supplements, such as Herbalife® Total Control® and Herbal Tea Concentrate, can help boost metabolism.* • Have a supply of protein-powered healthy snacks on hand as an alternative to carb-loaded junk food.

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

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SECTION FIVE: Week 3: Metabolism

METABOLISM: TRUTHS AND MYTHS By Susan Bowerman, M.S., R.D., C.S.S.D.

We hear a lot about metabolism – and often blame our “slow metabolism” for our inability to keep our weight under control. But what is metabolism, exactly? And is there anything we can do to change our metabolic rate? Metabolism basically refers to all the chemical processes that take place in the body in order to sustain life – allowing you to breathe, pump blood, keep your brain functioning and extract energy from your food. When you hear the term metabolic rate – more accurately called basal (or resting) metabolic rate – that refers to the number of calories your body at rest uses each day, just to keep all your vital organs functioning. You burn additional calories through your daily activities and formal exercise, but by far, the majority of the calories that you burn each day are your basal calories. The number of calories that you burn every day is directly related to your body composition. Think of your body as divided into two compartments. In one compartment is all the body fat; in the other compartment is everything that isn’t fat (e.g., bone, fluid, tissue, muscle) – that’s the fat-free compartment. The size of your fat-free compartment determines your metabolic rate, with every pound of fat-free mass burning about 14 calories per day. If you weigh 150 pounds and 50 pounds of you is fat and 100 pounds is fat-free, then you would burn about 1,400 calories per day at rest. If you don’t get much activity, you won’t burn much more than this throughout the day. But if you weigh 150 pounds and 25 pounds of you is fat, and 125 pounds of you is fat free, then you burn 1,750 calories per day at rest. And if you get some regular exercise and burn a few hundred calories more per day, your total calorie burn for the day might be 2,000 calories! Since the fat-free compartment contains muscle tissue, one of the best things you can do to boost your metabolic rate is to strength-train to increase your muscle mass. If you build up 10 pounds of lean body mass, that’s another 140 extra calories that you burn per day – not to mention the calories that you burn through exercise.

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SECTION FIVE: Week 3: Metabolism

METABOLISM: TRUTHS AND MYTHS (CONTINUED)

here are a few truths and myths about metabolism: Myth: Aging slows your MetAbolisM. truth: People do tend to put on weight as they get older, but it isn’t inevitable. People have a tendency to exercise less, or less vigorously, as they age – and that means fewer calories burned per day. As activity levels and intensity go down, loss of muscle mass can occur. This then shrinks the body’s fat-free compartment and leads to a lower metabolic rate. Cardiovascular exercise will burn calories, and resistance training to preserve or build up muscle are great defenses against age-related weight gain. Myth: you’re stuck with the MetAbolisM you hAve, And you cAn’t chAnge it. truth: We all seem to know people who can “eat whatever they want and never gain weight” or those who “just look at food and put on 10 pounds.” But lifestyle plays a big part in determining the calories you burn per day. While it may appear that there are people who eat all the time and never seem to gain, chances are they make healthy, relatively low-calorie selections naturally. And many of these people burn more calories through what is called Non-Exercise Activity Thermogenesis (neAT) – basically, they move around a lot during the day. They might fidget more, get up from their desks frequently during the day to stretch, or walk down the hall to talk to a colleague instead of emailing. next time you’re in a public place – say a coffeehouse – become an observer. You may notice that heavier people sit very still and hardly move. leaner people may use more hand gestures, or wiggle a foot or a crossed leg. The point is, build more muscle and then use it by moving around more throughout the day. Myth: eAting A grApefruit with My MeAl will speed up My MetAbolisM. truth: There’s nothing special about grapefruit that will speed up your metabolism. Sometimes it’s recommended that you should eat half a grapefruit with each meal for this purpose. But the reason this may work is not because of anything magical about grapefruit. It’s simply a watery, low-calorie food that takes up space in the stomach that might normally be taken up by higher-calorie foods. It may help weight loss, but it doesn’t have any effect on your metabolism.

Myth: if i cut cAlories, My MetAbolic rAte will slow down, so whAt’s the point of exercising? truth: It is true that your metabolic rate can slow a bit when you cut calories. After all, your body’s natural inclination will be to try to conserve calories as best it can. But these decreases are relatively small, and if people become more active as they lose weight, this can offset these small changes. By dieting and exercising, you can help to preserve the rate at which your body burns calories.

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SECTION FIVE: Week 3: Metabolism

POWER YOUR METABOLISM WITH PROTEIN Your muscle mass works like a furnace, burning calories and stored fat for energy. The more muscle you have, the higher your metabolism, the faster you burn calories. eating plenty of protein daily is essential to maintaining your muscle mass for good health, energy and effective weight management.

Energy Levels, Blood Sugar Levels and Hunger Control

Hunger Control

Lean Protein + Complex Carbohydrates: meal-replacement shakes, balanced meals and balanced snacks Lean Protein: chicken, fish, lean beef, egg whites and soy products

3+ hours

Complex Carbohydrates: fruits, vegetables and whole grains (whole oatmeal, brown rice, whole-wheat pasta and whole-wheat bread)

2–3 hours 10 minutes

Refined Sugar/Simple Carbohydrates: rice and pasta, fruit juice and white potatoes

30–60 minutes

Short

Lasting

Time

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SECTION FIVE: Week 4: Carbohydrates, Shopping and Cooking, Cellular nutrition

GOOD HEALTH ON HAND

The key to getting healthy meals on the table quickly is having a well-stocked pantry, refrigerator and freezer with the basic items that you will use frequently. here are some suggestions for stocking up. You don’t need to have all of these on hand, but these lists may encourage you to try new foods to add variety to your diet. protein powder • herbalife® Formula 1 nutritional Shake Mix cereals • high-protein cold cereals • Rolled oats • Multigrain hot cereals crackers • low-fat, whole-grain crackers dried foods • Sun-dried tomatoes • Dried mushrooms baking • Whole wheat, whole-wheat pastry, white whole-wheat flours • Dark cocoa powder • evaporated nonfat milk • Cornstarch for thickening snacks • herbalife® Protein Bar Deluxe • herbalife® Protein Drink Mix

pAntry beans • Dried beans such as black, pinto, garbanzo, cannelini, white beans for soups and spreads grains • Barley • Brown rice, wild rice, brown basmati rice • Whole-grain couscous • Millet • Quinoa • Buckwheat • Yellow cornmeal • Whole-grain pasta • Whole-grain breads, english muffins, bagels • Corn tortillas broth • low-sodium chicken or vegetable broth; some stores have other varieties such as mushroom broth. canned foods • Tomatoes • Pumpkin • hominy • Beans • Artichoke hearts • Roasted peppers • Applesauce to replace fats in baked goods • Canned or pouch pack light tuna in water, salmon, clams, shrimp, crab, chicken breast 52

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SECTION FIVE: Week 4: Carbohydrates, Shopping and Cooking, Cellular nutrition

fish • loose-pack frozen shrimp and scallops vegetarian foods • Veggie burgers and soy ground round dairy products • nonfat milk or soy milk • eggs or egg whites • nonfat cottage cheese • nonfat yogurt • low-fat string cheese • low-fat Parmesan cheese • nonfat ricotta cheese grains • Whole-grain waffles • Whole-grain breads • Corn tortillas

tea • green tea • White tea • oolong • Black tea • Rooibos • herbal blends refrigerAtor And freezer nuts • Pecans • Walnuts • Pine nuts • Almonds and other tree nuts stored in the freezer fruit • Frozen fruit loose-pack and unsweetened, frozen fruits are great for protein shakes. Also, you can thaw them quickly in the microwave and mix with yogurt or cottage cheese for a quick breakfast. • Frozen berries • Apples • Cherries • Mango • Pineapple • Peaches frozen vegetables – All kinds, but particularly the following, which are loose-pack and great for soups, stir-fry dishes and pasta: • Spinach • green beans • Sliced peppers • Mixed stir-fry vegetables • edamame (soybeans) • Broccoli and cauliflower

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seAsonings And condiMents vinegars • Balsamic • Rice • Apple cider • Fig oils • olive oil (pan-spray form also) • Sesame oil • Walnut oil • Avocado oil spices and herbs • Allspice • ginger • Cinnamon • nutmeg • Cloves

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SECTION FIVE: Week 4: Carbohydrates, Shopping and Cooking, Cellular nutrition

GOOD HEALTH ON HAND (CONTINUED)

extracts • All-natural vanilla, maple, almond, orange, lemon, mint

spices and herbs (continued) • Coriander • Turmeric • Cardamom • White pepper • Black pepper • Red pepper flakes • Cumin • oregano • Basil • Rosemary • Thyme • Sage • Dill • Curry powder • garlic powder • onion powder • Chili powder (regular and chipotle) • Dry mustard • Wasabi other seasonings • Dijon mustard • Tabasco • light soy sauce • Rice wine (mirin) • Ketchup • Miso paste • oyster sauce • Thai fish sauce • Chili-garlic sauce • Salsa

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fresh fruits and vegetables Try to purchase your fruits and vegetables locally and seasonally. For convenience, you can use precut carrots; prewashed salad greens and other vegetables; preshredded cabbage; chopped onions and garlic; and fresh-cut fruit.

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SECTION FIVE: Week 4: Carbohydrates, Shopping and Cooking, Cellular nutrition

LIGHTEN UP YOUR MEALS

your weekly chAllenge There are two challenges this week. This first challenge is to try a new fruit or vegetable each week. Most of us eat the same foods day after day, and do our shopping almost mindlessly – buying the same things every week. If you like spinach, try another leafy green like kale, Swiss chard or turnip greens. If you eat oranges or apples, try deep-red blood oranges or a new apple variety. Instead of the usual white potato, try a sweet potato for a change. Fruits and vegetables each have their own unique health benefits, and a wider variety of fruits and vegetables is a great way to make improvements in the nutritional value of your diet. The second challenge this week is to take a favorite recipe and “lighten it up.” look at the table of ingredient substitutions below and see how they might work with your favorite recipe. Also look at the tips for cutting down on fat and calories during preparation. You might be surprised to find that you like the lighter version better. ingredient substitutions for recipes IF THE RECIPE CALLS FOR: USE THIS INSTEAD:

COMMENTS:

Ground beef

Ground turkey or chicken, or soy ground round

Spray pan with pan spray before browning; drain any fat from pan after browning. Soy ground round is already cooked.

Butter or margarine for baking

Applesauce; baby food prunes or carrots

You will need to experiment, but you can replace ½ or more of the fat in the recipe and get a nutritional boost.

Butter to sauté vegetables

Pan spray; broth, wine, vegetable juice

Spray pan with pan spray; sauté in wine, broth or vegetable juice. Cover pan to “sweat” vegetables.

Cheese

Reduced-fat cheese

Use reduced-fat cheese, and reduce the total amount in the recipe if possible.

Cream (not for whipping)

Evaporated nonfat milk; fat-free half-and-half

Evaporated nonfat milk can be used in recipes and in coffee.

Eggs in baking

Egg whites or egg substitutes

Egg substitutes are 99% egg white; you can also use two egg whites to replace one whole egg in baking.

Mayonnaise

Nonfat mayonnaise

Nuts

Use less

Reduce amount by half, and toast first to enhance flavor.

Pie crust

Graham-cracker crust

Traditional pie crust is very high in fat and saturated fat; graham crackers are whole grain.

Sour cream, cream cheese, Use nonfat versions; plain nonfat cottage cheese yogurt can replace sour cream

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Try whirling cottage cheese in the blender with a little lemon juice; it makes a smooth, creamy sour cream substitute.

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SECTION FIVE: Week 4: Carbohydrates, Shopping and Cooking, Cellular nutrition

TASTEFUL TIPS

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use pan sprays regularly. Spray the pan when it is cold, then place over the flame. You can reduce fat considerably by taking this first step. once the pan is hot, you can add a small amount of healthy olive oil for flavor.



Replace refined starches with whole grain: Try brown rice, whole-wheat pasta, whole-wheat bread and crackers, whole-wheat couscous, and oatmeal instead of cream of wheat. You can buy quickcooking brown rice that can be ready in 15 minutes.



Add diced vegetables to soups, chili, meat loaf, casseroles, tuna or chicken salad and pasta sauce to reduce overall calories and boost nutrition.



Season steamed vegetables with lemon, vinegar, herbs, garlic, onion and spices rather than relying on butter or sauces.



Add fruits to salad for a change. Try fresh orange or tangerine sections, apples or kiwi. use deepgreen leafy vegetables, instead of iceberg lettuce, for more nutrition.



Frozen vegetables and fruits are just as nutritious and fresh, may be less expensive, and allow you to eat foods that might not be in season anytime of the year. For example, loose-leaf frozen spinach or chopped vegetables can easily be added to soups and stews.



Take advantage of the healthy convenience items such as prewashed salad greens, precut fruit and baby carrots. They may cost more, but if you keep buying fruits and vegetables and throwing them away because you don’t take time to prepare them, it may be less expensive in the long run. If your market has a salad bar, you can buy prewashed, precut vegetables like broccoli, mushrooms, cauliflower and carrots, which you can take home and steam or stir-fry.



Visit a local farmers market. The produce is usually much fresher than what you find in the supermarkets, which means vegetables won’t wilt as quickly and the foods retain their nutritional value. You can find new varieties of fruits and vegetables to try, and you will be eating foods that are in season.

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SECTION FIVE: Week 4: Carbohydrates, Shopping and Cooking, Cellular nutrition



You can thicken soups without added butter, flour or cream. Place some of the broth and vegetables in the blender and then stir back into the soup. or make your own “cream” soups by cooking vegetables with broth, onions, garlic and seasoning – then puree it all in the blender with a little evaporated nonfat milk or soft tofu for a delicious creamy soup.



Try different mustards and vinegars for seasoning salads and vegetables without fat.



Double the recipe for dishes that freeze well, such as soups, stews and casseroles. That way, when you’re tired and don’t want to cook, you can pull something healthy from the freezer rather than pulling into the drive-through.



You’ve heard it many times, but don’t shop when you are hungry. It’s too tempting to pick up the wrong foods. Make a list and stick to it, for the most part, but be flexible.



Supermarkets are carefully laid out to tempt you – so don’t get tempted by the candy at the checkout. Also, studies show that people who buy large containers of foods tend to serve themselves more from those containers, so try to keep portion sizes consistent if you buy economy-sized packages.

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SECTION FIVE: Week 4: Carbohydrates, Shopping and Cooking, Cellular nutrition

RECIPE REDO

here’s an example of how you can give your recipes a makeover for healthier results. Make sure to experiment with your recipes at home. This Shrimp Rice Casserole is real comfort food, and with a tossed salad and fruit for dessert, it makes a great dinner. But as with many one-dish meals, the original is loaded with fat – items such as butter, cheese and condensed soups. The original recipe called for ½ cup of butter, a can of cream of mushroom soup, and 2 cups (8 ounces) of shredded cheddar cheese. The strategies for improving the nutritional value of the dish included reducing the cheese by half, reducing the fat from 8 tablespoons down to 2 (and replacing the butter with heart-healthy olive oil), and making a simple mushroom sauce to replace the canned soup, which is loaded with fat and sodium. An additional nutritional boost was made by substituting brown rice for white. You could also add some cooked broccoli florets to this dish for a true one-dish meal.

MAkeover version 1 pound uncooked medium shrimp, peeled and deveined 2 tablespoons olive oil, divided 12 ounces fresh mushrooms, sliced 1 large green pepper, chopped 1 medium onion, chopped 3 tablespoons all-purpose flour 3/4 tablespoon salt 1/8 tablespoon cayenne pepper 11/3 cup fat-free milk 3 cups cooked brown rice 1 cup (4 ounces) shredded reduced-fat cheddar cheese

old version (6 servings) 1 large green pepper, chopped 1 medium onion, chopped ½ cup butter or margarine 1 pound uncooked medium shrimp, peeled and deveined ½ tablespoon salt ¼ tablespoon cayenne pepper 3 cups cooked long-grain rice 1 can (10 ¾ ounces) condensed cream of mushroom soup 2 cups (8 ounces) shredded cheddar cheese nutrition facts per serving: Calories: 642 Fat: 42 grams Protein: 33 grams Fiber: 2 grams

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nutrition facts per serving: Calories: 320 (cut in half) Fat: 10 grams (cut by 75%) Protein: 24 grams (a bit less because cheese was reduced, but still plenty for a serving) Fiber: 4 grams (doubled) S

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SECTION FIVE: Week 4: Carbohydrates, Shopping and Cooking, Cellular nutrition

directions: Preheat the oven to 325 degrees. Coat a 1½ quart baking dish with nonstick cooking spray and set aside. In a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat, sauté shrimp in 1 tablespoon olive oil for 2 to 3 minutes or until shrimp turn pink. Remove and set aside. In the same skillet, sauté the mushrooms, green pepper and onion in the remaining olive oil until tender. Stir in the flour, salt and cayenne pepper, and cook for a minute or so to remove the raw taste of the flour. gradually add the milk, and stir until blended. Bring to a boil, cook and stir for 2 minutes, or until thickened. Add the rice, ½ cup cheese and shrimp, and stir until combined. Pour into the baking dish and bake for 30 to 35 minutes, or until heated through. Sprinkle with remaining cheese; cover and let stand for 5 minutes, until cheese is melted.

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SECTION FIVE: Week 4: Carbohydrates, Shopping and Cooking, Cellular nutrition

PROTEIN-POWERED SHAKE RECIPES WITH HERBALIFE® FORMULA 1 NUTRITIONAL SHAKE MIX 4 ice cubes Place all ingredients in the blender, and blend thoroughly until the ice cubes are completely crushed.

puMpkin-bAnAnA sMoothie 2 scoops French Vanilla Formula 1 nutritional Shake Mix 2 tablespoons herbalife® Personalized Protein Powder 1 cup nonfat milk or plain soy milk ¼ cup canned pumpkin (not pumpkin pie mix) ½ medium banana Few drops vanilla extract Scant 1/8 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice 4 ice cubes Place all ingredients in the blender, and blend thoroughly until the ice cubes are completely crushed.

chAi teA lAtte sMoothie 2 scoops French Vanilla Formula 1 nutritional Shake Mix 2 tablespoons herbalife® Personalized Protein Powder 1 cup nonfat milk or plain soy milk ½ medium banana 3 tablespoons unsweetened liquid iced tea concentrate Scant 1/8 teaspoon cinnamon A few dashes each of ginger, clove, black pepper 4–5 ice cubes Place all ingredients in the blender, and blend thoroughly until the ice cubes are completely crushed.

chocolAte-rAspberry shAke 2 scoops Dutch Chocolate Formula 1 nutritional Shake Mix 2 tablespoons herbalife® Personalized Protein Powder 1 cup nonfat milk or plain soy milk 1 cup frozen raspberries 1/8 teaspoon orange extract 4 ice cubes Place all ingredients in the blender, and blend thoroughly until the ice cubes are completely crushed.

bAnAnA breAd shAke 2 scoops French Vanilla Formula 1 nutritional Shake Mix 2 tablespoons herbalife® Personalized Protein Powder 1 cup nonfat milk or plain soy milk ½ very ripe banana 1/8 tablespoon black walnut flavoring Few drops vanilla extract A dash cinnamon 4 ice cubes Place all ingredients in the blender, and blend thoroughly until the ice cubes are completely crushed.

strAwberry-kiwi shAke 2 scoops French Vanilla Formula 1 nutritional Shake Mix 2 tablespoons herbalife® Personalized Protein Powder 1 cup nonfat milk or plain soy milk ½ cup frozen whole strawberries 1 very ripe kiwi, peeled 1/8 teaspoon lemon extract 60

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SECTION FIVE: Week 4: Carbohydrates, Shopping and Cooking, Cellular nutrition

pineApple-orAnge-coconut shAke 2 scoops French Vanilla Formula 1 nutritional Shake Mix 2 tablespoons herbalife® Personalized Protein Powder 1 cup nonfat milk or plain soy milk 1 cup frozen pineapple chunks 1/8 tablespoon coconut extract ¼ tablespoon orange extract 4 ice cubes Place all ingredients in the blender, and blend thoroughly until the ice cubes are completely crushed. very berry shAke 2 scoops French Vanilla Formula 1 nutritional Shake Mix 2 tablespoons herbalife® Personalized Protein Powder 1/3 cup nonfat dry milk powder 1 cup low-calorie cranberry juice 1 cup frozen mixed berries Few drops vanilla extract 4 ice cubes Place all ingredients in the blender, and blend thoroughly until the ice cubes are completely crushed.

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chocolAte-strAwberry shAke 2 scoops Dutch Chocolate Formula 1 nutritional Shake Mix 2 tablespoons herbalife® Personalized Protein Powder 1 cup nonfat milk or plain soy milk 1 cup frozen strawberries Few drops vanilla extract 4 ice cubes Place all ingredients in the blender, and blend thoroughly until the ice cubes are completely crushed. orAnge Julius shAke 2 scoops French Vanilla Formula 1 nutritional Shake Mix 2 tablespoons herbalife® Personalized Protein Powder 1 cup nonfat milk or plain soy milk 3 tablespoons frozen orange juice concentrate ¼ tablespoon vanilla extract 4 ice cubes Place all ingredients in the blender, and blend thoroughly until the ice cubes are completely crushed.

orAnge-MAngo shAke 2 scoops French Vanilla Formula 1 nutritional Shake Mix 2 tablespoons herbalife® Personalized Protein Powder 1 cup nonfat milk or plain soy milk ½ cup frozen mango chunks ½ cup canned mandarin oranges, drained 4 ice cubes W

Place all ingredients in the blender, and blend thoroughly until the ice cubes are completely crushed.

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SECTION FIVE: Week 4: Carbohydrates, Shopping and Cooking, Cellular nutrition

PROTEIN-POWERED SHAKE RECIPES WITH HERBALIFE® FORMULA 1 NUTRITIONAL SHAKE MIX (CONTINUED) ½ medium banana 2 tablespoons instant coffee crystals A dash cinnamon 4 ice cubes Place all ingredients in the blender, and blend thoroughly until the ice cubes are completely crushed.

Apple pie shAke 2 scoops French Vanilla Formula 1 nutritional Shake Mix 2 tablespoons herbalife® Personalized Protein Powder 1 cup nonfat milk or plain soy milk 1 cup frozen apple slices Few dashes each of cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves ¼ tablespoon vanilla extract 4 ice cubes Place all ingredients in the blender, and blend thoroughly until the ice cubes are completely crushed.

blueberry-crAnberry shAke 2 scoops French Vanilla Formula 1 nutritional Shake Mix 2 tablespoons herbalife® Personalized Protein Powder 1/3 cup nonfat dry milk 1 cup low-calorie cranberry juice 1 cup frozen blueberries Few drops orange extract 4 ice cubes Place all ingredients in the blender, and blend thoroughly until the ice cubes are completely crushed.

peAch-AlMond shAke 2 scoops French Vanilla Formula 1 nutritional Shake Mix 2 tablespoons herbalife® Personalized Protein Powder 1 cup nonfat milk or plain soy milk 1 cup frozen peach slices Few dashes ground ginger ¼ tablespoon almond extract 4 ice cubes Place all ingredients in the blender, and blend thoroughly until the ice cubes are completely crushed.

heAlthy Additions! • 2 to 4 ounces herbalife® herbal Aloe Concentrate • 1½ teaspoons herbalife® Active Fiber Complex • 1 tablespoon herbalife® Personalized Protein Powder

cAfé MochA shAke 2 scoops Dutch Chocolate Formula 1 nutritional Shake Mix 2 tablespoons herbalife® Personalized Protein Powder 1 cup nonfat milk or plain soy milk

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SECTION FIVE: Week 4: Carbohydrates, Shopping and Cooking, Cellular nutrition

ADDITIONAL PROTEIN-POWERED RECIPES WITH HERBALIFE® FORMULA 1 NUTRITIONAL SHAKE MIX herbAlife® forMulA 1 pie – bAsic recipe ¾ cups Formula 1 nutritional Shake Mix (any flavor) 2 cups nonfat milk or plain soy milk 1 small package sugar-free or regular pudding mix 1 ready-made pie crust Combine the Formula 1 nutritional Shake Mix with the nonfat milk or soymilk; mix until smooth. Add pudding, and mix well. Place the ready-made pie crust in a 1-quart plastic storage bag and crush well. Press 1 tablespoon of crust into the bottom of an 8-ounce container. Measure ½ cup of the pie mixture, and place on top of crust. Add 1 tablespoon of whipped cream, and cover with a lid. Makes six pies. You can create your own variations by trying different flavors of herbalife® Formula 1 nutritional Shake Mix and pudding mix, and garnishing with different fruits. These freeze well, so you can make several flavors and save them at one time. have them as an occasional treat to replace a meal, and be sure to round it out with a serving of fruit (either on the side or as a garnish).

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herbAlife ® forMulA 1 And oAtMeAl 2 scoops Formula 1 nutritional Shake Mix (any flavor) 1/3 cup dry rolled oats 2/3 cup nonfat milk Cook the dry rolled oats in the nonfat milk, and then stir in the Formula 1 Shake Mix. one serving = 1 meal replacement. herbAlife ® forMulA 1 And yogurt Stir 2 scoops of Formula 1 nutritional Shake Mix (any flavor) into 8 ounces of low-fat yogurt (any flavor), and enjoy! one serving = 1 meal replacement. MAple-pecAn bAr snAcks 1 cup French Vanilla Formula 1 nutritional Shake Mix 1 cup dry rolled oats ½ cup peanut butter ½ cup pure maple syrup 1–2 capfuls of maple flavoring ½ cup chopped pecans Combine all ingredients, and press mixture into an 8-by-8-inch pan. Cut into 16 pieces. one serving = 1 meal replacement.

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SECTION FIVE: Week 4: Carbohydrates, Shopping and Cooking, Cellular nutrition

HEALTHY BREAKFAST Feel Good and Control Your Weight

cArbs-bAsed breAkfAst In the morning, simple carbohydrates (e.g., sugary refined cereals, white breads, toasts, etc.) cause an immediate surge of blood sugar levels, which results in the release of a substantial amount of insulin. The insulin removes sugar from the blood and puts it into storage, primarily in fat tissue. The result is a decreased level of blood sugar and a thirst for more carbs. This cycle repeats itself two to three more times during the day. When blood sugars drop quickly, we often look for something sweet to bring the levels back up. If this happens enough times during the day, we could end up snacking too much and taking in too many calories. skipping breAkfAst When you skip breakfast, blood sugar drops below the normal level, and you experience cravings and a drop in energy. You again revert to simple carbohydrates to achieve a quick surge of blood sugar and to overcome hunger and a drop in energy. Simple carbohydrates will cause an immediate surge of blood sugar levels and a substantial insulin emission. The insulin removes sugar from blood turning its excess into fat. Then this cycle repeats itself two to three more times during the day. This vicious cycle constitutes one of the major reasons for diabetes, high blood pressure and extra weight. bAlAnced protein-bAsed ✓ breAkfAst Such a breakfast supplies our body with all vital nutrients and energy without increasing blood sugar and insulin levels. It helps to avoid dependence on carbs during the day. In this way, appetite stays under control, cravings for carbs (e.g., snacks, chocolate, pastry, soft drinks, etc.) diminish, and the body uses its own stored fats to get more energy.

note: The sugar-/insulin-response curves are schematic illustrations of a known physiological reaction. The exact science behind it is complex and varies for different people.

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SECTION FIVE: Week 4: Carbohydrates, Shopping and Cooking, Cellular nutrition

MAXIMIZE YOUR HEALTH WITH CELLULAR NUTRITION Through Cellular nutrition, healthy nutrients help nourish your cells with our exclusive blends of plant-based nutrients that provide vitamins, antioxidants and minerals to support cell function. In this way, our products deliver healthy nutrients to cells throughout the body, as part of a healthy diet. Cells are the basic unit of the human body, providing the power for everything you do – from thinking to growing. For example, our products are formulated to support healthy villi, the tiny finger-like structures along the intestine wall that act as “gatekeepers,” helping your body absorb more nutrients, vitamins and minerals, while protecting you from toxins. The healthier your villi, the more efficiently your cells can absorb nourishment – and the healthier you’ll be. herbalife maximizes Cellular nutrition through unique, scientific formulations. It’s the select blends of high-quality ingredients and the methods used to preserve their nutrient value. It’s the way we personalize programs to address each individual’s needs...it’s the herbalife Advantage.

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SECTION FIVE: Week 5: nutrition labels, Fats, Portion Control

LOOK AT THE LABEL By Susan Bowerman, M.S., R.D., C.S.S.D.

chunky, cheesy, rich And creAMy broccoli soup

one of the most important skills you can master is being able to read a food label in order to figure out exactly what you are getting from your foods.

nutrition facts Serving Size: 1 cup (250 g) Servings per Container 2 Calories Calories from Fat % Daily Value

250 135

Total Fat Saturated Fat Trans Fat Cholesterol Sodium Potassium Total Carbohydrate Dietary Fiber Sugars other Carbohdyrate Protein

15 g 3g 0g 30 mg 750 mg 200 mg 34 g 2g 2g 30 g 5g

let’s look at the example to the left and take the information from top to bottom… serving size and servings per container: Pay attention to this closely. Many people assume that small packages of cookies or crackers, or medium-sized beverage containers are single servings. But this may not be the case. An “official” serving of a beverage is 8 ounces, but many drinks are packaged in 16 oz. containers or larger. All the nutrition facts on the label are for one serving. If you drink a 16 oz. beverage, you will be drinking twice the number of calories on the nutrition facts panel, since you’ll be taking in two servings. You will need to double all the information on the label to determine exactly what you are taking in.

25% 15% 10% 30% 5% 11% 10%

10%

calories, fat, carbohydrate and protein: As with all the other nutrients, these are the amounts per serving. In the example to the left, one cup of Chunky, Cheesy, Rich and Creamy Broccoli Soup has 250 calories. But if you consume the whole package (two servings), you will have taken in 500 calories. In addition to the total fat per serving, the label also tells you the calories from fat, so you can do a quick calculation in your head of what percentage of calories you are eating from fat. In the example, there are 135 calories from fat out of a total of 250 calories. You can see right away that more than half the calories in the soup come from fat. The label also tells you how much of the fat is saturated fat or trans fat. “Total Carbohydrate” tells you, again, how much carbohydrate per serving. Keep in mind that this includes natural sources, such as the natural sugars in milk or fruit, so it’s not always easy to tell from the line labeled “Sugars” where the sugar is coming from without looking at the ingredients list. If a cereal has little added sugar – but contains raisins – the sugar content may look high, but it’s just from the natural fruit sugar.

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SECTION FIVE: Week 5: nutrition labels, Fats, Portion Control

look at the ingredients list for sugar: sugar, brown sugar, cane sugar, beet sugar, corn syrup, corn syrup solids, brown rice syrup, dextrose, fructose, fruit juice concentrate, high fructose corn syrup, honey, invert sugar, maltodextrin, molasses, raw sugar, turbinado sugar and sucrose are all added sugars. Sometimes food manufacturers use a number of sweeteners in a product – each in small amounts – so the ingredients are “sprinkled” throughout the ingredients list, but taken together they can sometimes add up significantly. Fiber and sugars are part of the total carbohydrate count. A food with 5 grams or more of fiber per serving is a good source of fiber. % daily value: Daily Values are standard values developed by the Food and Drug Administration for use on food labels. They are standards used to compare the amount of a nutrient in a food to the amount that is recommended per day, but is based on a 2,000-calorie diet that may not apply to everyone. even if you know that you don’t require that many calories, you can still look at these values to see if a particular food is high or low in a nutrient that you are interested in. In the example above, one serving of the soup provides 30 percent of the Daily Value for sodium, which is quite a bit. But it also has 25 percent of the Daily Value for fat – that means that one-fourth of the recommended fat for the day is packed into 1 cup of soup – that’s a lot of fat per serving! here are some things to visualize when you are looking at a food label: ● every 5 grams of fat is a teaspoon of fat (or a pat of butter). In the example above, each cup serving of soup has 15 grams of fat – that’s three teaspoons (or one tablespoon), or three pats of butter per serving! If you consume the whole can (two servings), then you are consuming six pats of butter! ● every 4 grams of sugar is a teaspoon. The soup above has very little sugar – only 2 grams per serving, or about a half a teaspoon. But a 16 oz. bottle of sweetened tea might have 30 grams per serving (and remember, the bottle is two servings of 8 ounces each). If you drink the whole bottle, you’ll be drinking 60 grams of sugar – that’s 15 teaspoons, or five tablespoons, or just under 1/3 cup!

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SECTION FIVE: Week 5: nutrition labels, Fats, Portion Control

THE SKINNY ON FATS By Susan Bowerman, M.S., R.D., C.S.S.D.

The issue of dietary fat is probably one of the most confusing to people. Should you eat as little as possible? More of the “good” fats? The answer lies somewhere in between. Ideally, you want to eat only the amount that you need to add flavor to foods, and of the fats you eat, you want to select the healthiest ones. All fats, regardless of their source, are about 120 calories a tablespoon, so most people can’t (and shouldn’t) eat them freely. here are some things to remember:

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Fats are categorized as saturated, polyunsaturated or monounsatured, depending on the predominant fatty acid they contain.



generally speaking, saturated fats (found in animal products like meats, cheese and ice cream as well as hydrogenated vegetable oils) tend to raise blood cholesterol levels. The process of hydrogenating oils, which makes them harder at room temperature, produces trans-fatty acids – which also raise blood cholesterol and should be avoided.



Polyunsaturated fats can be “good” or “bad,” depending on whether they are primarily omega-6 fats (which are pro-inflammatory) or omega-3 fats (which are anti-inflammatory).



The richest source of omega-6 fats in the American diet is corn oil; the richest sources of omega-3 fats in the American diet are fish, flaxseed and vegetables.



While small amounts of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids are called “essential,” meaning our bodies can’t make them, the amounts required are very small and can be met from plant products, which have a good balance of the two fats.



our diet is typically overloaded with omega-6 fatty acids, with inadequate amounts of omega-3. This imbalance, with too many “bad” fats relative to “good” fats, promotes the inflammatory process, which is believed to be at the root of asthma, heart disease and many common forms of cancer.



Monounsaturated fats, found in olive oil and avocado, have neutral effects on cholesterol and do not promote cancer. These fats are “healthy” fats and can be eaten in moderation.



olive oil is a healthy oil for cooking; if the flavor is too strong for you, you can purchase “light” olive oils, which have the same calories as regular olive oil, but are lighter in flavor.

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SECTION FIVE: Week 5: nutrition labels, Fats, Portion Control

to reduce overall fat intake: • Try using pan sprays when you sauté foods, or you can sauté in wine or broth. •

use nonfat or reduced-fat versions of high-fat items, such as dairy products, spreads and dressings.



If you are watching calories, keep in mind that low-fat or fat-free versions of baked goods often have the same amount of calories as the full-fat version. In many cases, fat is replaced with sugar, which drives up the calories.



Avoid fatty meats such as steaks, high-fat ground meats, chops and sausages. eat more poultry breast, fish, shellfish, egg whites, nonfat dairy products and soy products for protein, which have much less fat than red meats.



Avoid farmed salmon, if possible. Farmed salmon is fattier than wild salmon, but the extra fat it contains is not the “good” fat. Despite myths to the contrary, shellfish is not high in cholesterol, and is an excellent source of protein that is very low in fat.



Flavor foods with herbs, spices, lemon, onions, garlic, chilies and other seasonings rather than relying on heavy sauces, gravies and butter.



When you eat out, try to make smart choices. Keep sauces and gravies to a minimum, and order meats, fish or poultry grilled, broiled, poached, steamed, roasted or baked. Some people skip the starchy part of the meal, especially if it’s likely to be fatty, and order double vegetables instead.



order salad dressing on the side so you can control how much you eat. Restaurants often drench the greens in high-fat dressings.



Try fresh fruit or sorbet for dessert rather than pastries and ice cream.

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SECTION FIVE: Week 5: nutrition labels, Fats, Portion Control

GOOD AND BAD FATS By Luigi Gratton, M.D., M.P.H.

oMegA-3s And oMegA-6s of the many types of fatty acids, two that seem to be making all the headlines these days are the omega-3s and omega-6s. These names simply describe the chemical structure of fats, but you only need to remember the omega-3s tend to reduce inflammation in the body, while the omega-6s tend to promote inflammation in the body. This is the most basic way to describe these two fatty acids. The omega-3s are found in fish, flaxseed and borage oil, while the omega-6s are found in corn and wheat. nutritional anthropologists believe that the diet of ancient women and men was relatively balanced between these two fats. Both are important, and a healthy ratio between the two determines health. The omega-3s are also found in ocean plants like seaweed algae. The fish eat the omega-3-rich algae; the fish store the healthy fats; we eat the fish; and we store the healthy fats. Again, the phrase “you are what you eat” could never be more factual. The omega-3s are also found in grass, which many animals naturally live on. Cows naturally eat the grass in the fields as they graze, they store the good fats, and we, in turn, get beef that is high in the good fats. The change in the food supply has dramatically changed this process. now most cows in the united States are corn fed to fatten them up faster for food production. This process is not what nature intended. So once again, we find a disruption of nature’s delicate balance.

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SECTION FIVE: Week 5: nutrition labels, Fats, Portion Control

MEAL SIZE MATTERS By Luigi Gratton, M.D., M.P.H.

For many of us, one of the main goals of achieving and maintaining a healthy weight is learning how to eat less. Part of the problem is that we don’t have a realistic idea of what constitutes a serving. In an era of jumbo meals, supersizing and free refills, overgenerous portions of food and beverages have become the norm. In addition, eating habits that you learned from a young age – that it’s okay to have seconds, that you should clean your plate, that dessert always follows a meal – can be difficult to break. But difficult doesn’t mean impossible. You can train your body to feel full with less, just as it has become accustomed to needing more. Try these suggestions: •

Serve meals already dished onto plates instead of placing serving bowls on the table. This allows you to think twice before having a second portion.



Try using a smaller plate or festive party bowl to make the food seem like more.



eat slowly and savor each bite. When you eat too fast, your brain doesn’t get the signal that you’re full until too late and you’ve already overeaten.



eat foods that are healthy and low in calories first. You can eat a lot of these foods without taking in a lot of calories. When at a party – hit the vegetable trays first.



When eating, focus on your meal and your company. Watching television, reading or working while you eat can distract you. Before you know it, you’ve eaten much more than you wanted to.



Stop eating as soon as you begin to feel full. Don’t feel as if you need to clean your plate.



Designate one area of the house to eat meals, such as the kitchen table, and sit to eat your meals.



If you’re still hungry after you’ve finished what’s on your plate, wait 20 minutes, mingle with other guests, and then if you are still hungry, nibble on something low in calories, such as fresh vegetables or fruit.



When ordering at a restaurant, request a take-home container. When you receive your meal, put part of it in the container. or ask that one-half of your meal be put into a container before the meal is served. Portion sizes in restaurants can be two to three times the amount you need.

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SECTION FIVE: Week 5: nutrition labels, Fats, Portion Control

BE WISE TO PORTION SIZE

one serving is equivAlent to: one medium-size fruit (size of a tennis ball, your fist or a light bulb). Suggestions: • Wake up with an orange for breakfast • Add a sweet crunch to your lunch with an apple • A pear is a quick and easy dessert ½ cup cooked, frozen or canned vegetables or fruit (smaller than a can of tuna fish). Suggestions: • grab some baby carrots for a snack • order pizza with mushrooms, onions, peppers, broccoli or spinach – that’s more than one serving • Place canned sliced peaches or berries on low-fat ice cream 1 cup of raw leafy vegetables (a handful of greens counts as one serving). Suggestions: • Add a handful of baby spinach to your sandwich wrap • have a mixed green salad with a slice of veggie-topped pizza for lunch • Keep washed greens in the fridge for a quick salad snack ½ cup cooked dry peas or beans (think smaller than a can of tuna fish again). Suggestions: • Add canned or frozen beans to vegetable soup • Make a salad with a variety of lima, red kidney or green beans, diced onions and Italian dressing • Toss pinto and garbanzo beans into a green salad quick tip: When dining out, here’s a new way of looking at those garnishes that make your plates so beautiful: eat them. Try that orange slice and especially that green parsley. not only is parsley nature’s best remedy to fresh breath, it’s naturally nutritious as well. Source: 5aday.org

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SECTION FIVE: Week 5: nutrition labels, Fats, Portion Control

QUIZ: PORTION DISTORTION

Portion sizes – the amount of food we choose to eat for a meal or snack–have gotten larger over the years, and yet the standard serving sizes that are often referred to are much, much smaller. See how good you are at estimating portions, and also see how much our typical portions have grown over the years. 1. An official serving of cooked meat is 3 ounces. A good way to estimate this serving would be to keep in mind that it is about the size of: a. A deck of playing cards b. A paperback novel c. A video cassette 2. how much larger is a typical serving of pasta, compared to the “official” government serving of ½ cup? a. Two times b. Three times c. Four times d. Five times 3. twenty years ago, the typical cheeseburger had about 335 calories. how many calories does the typical cheeseburger have today? a. 350 b. 450 c. 600 d. 900 4. if you wanted to have an ounce of cheese for a snack, that piece of cheese would be about the same size as: a. A book of matches b. Your palm c. Your thumb d. A stick of butter 5. the official serving of french fries has about 200 calories. how many calories are in a typical “large” order of french fries? a. 325 b. 400 c. 500 d. 625 W

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SECTION FIVE: Week 5: nutrition labels, Fats, Portion Control

QUIZ: PORTION DISTORTION (CONTINUED)

6. pizza is no longer just some crust, some sauce and some cheese. it’s loaded down with meats and cheeses, and even has extra cheese in the crust. An “official” government serving is a slice of cheese pizza containing about 250 calories. About how many calories in a slice of a “super-loaded” meat and cheese pizza? a. 300 b. 350 c. 400 d. 450 7. A small box of unbuttered popcorn at the movies will cost you just under 300 calories. how much for the large tub with butter? a. 400 b. 500 c. 600 d. 800 e. More than 1,000 8. A small sandwich cookie has about 50 calories. if you get a large chocolate chip cookie from the fresh bakery at the mall, you’ve eaten the calorie equivalent of how many sandwich cookies? a. 2 b. 4 c. 6 d. 8 9. A brownie recipe in the 1975 version of the cookbook the Joy of cooking stated that the recipe made 30 brownies. the exact same recipe in the newest edition of the cookbook states that the recipe makes how many brownies? a. 1 b. 8 c. 16 d. 24 e. 30 10. some tricks that have been shown to work in helping you keep your portion sizes under control are: a. using smaller plates b. Drinking out of glasses that are tall and skinny, rather than short and wide c. eating with a teaspoon instead of a soup spoon d. eating foods that are all the same color e. All of the above 74

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SECTION FIVE: Week 5: nutrition labels, Fats, Portion Control

ANSWER KEY: PORTION DISTORTION

1. An official serving of cooked meat is 3 ounces. A good way to estimate this serving would be to keep in mind that it is about the size of: a. A deck of playing cards b. A paperback novel c. A video cassette 2. how much larger is a typical serving of pasta, compared to the “official” government serving of ½ cup? a. Two times b. Three times c. Four times d. Five times 3. twenty years ago, the typical cheeseburger had about 335 calories. how many calories does the typical cheeseburger have today? a. 350 b. 450 c. 600 d. 900 4. if you wanted to have an ounce of cheese for a snack, that piece of cheese would be about the same size as: a. A book of matches b. Your palm c. Your thumb d. A stick of butter 5. the official serving of french fries has about 200 calories. how many calories are in a typical “large” order of french fries? a. 325 b. 400 c. 500 d. 625

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SECTION FIVE: Week 5: nutrition labels, Fats, Portion Control

ANSWER KEY: PORTION DISTORTION (CONTINUED)

6. pizza is no longer just some crust, some sauce and some cheese. it’s loaded down with meats and cheeses, and even has extra cheese in the crust. An “official” government serving is a slice of cheese pizza containing about 250 calories. About how many calories in a slice of a “super-loaded” meat and cheese pizza? a. 300 b. 350 c. 400 d. 450 7. A small box of unbuttered popcorn at the movies will cost you just under 300 calories. how much for the large tub with butter? a. 400 b. 500 c. 600 d. 800 e. More than 1,000 8. A small sandwich cookie has about 50 calories. if you get a large chocolate chip cookie from the fresh bakery at the mall, you’ve eaten the calorie equivalent of how many sandwich cookies? a. 2 b. 4 c. 6 d. 8 9. A brownie recipe in the 1975 version of the cookbook the Joy of cooking stated that the recipe made 30 brownies. the exact same recipe in the newest edition of the cookbook states that the recipe makes how many brownies? a. 1 b. 8 c. 16 d. 24 e. 30 10. some tricks that have been shown to work in helping you keep your portion sizes under control are: a. using smaller plates b. Drinking out of glasses that are tall and skinny, rather than short and wide c. eating with a teaspoon instead of a soup spoon d. eating foods that are all the same color e. All of the above 76

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SECTION FIVE: Week 6: Digestive health

WEIGHT LOSS BEGINS WITH DIGESTIVE HEALTH Your digestive system is one of the most essential components of your entire body. According to a recent survey, people have a keen interest in digestive health issues. More than 50 percent of people surveyed have grown more concerned about their digestive health in the past two years. And a solid 80 percent feel it’s important to improve their body’s digestive health, although they’re not doing much about it. herbAlife for digestive heAlth Digestive health can affect other areas of our health – weight, energy, skin and immunity – in ways we might never have imagined. It’s important to understand the link between digestive health and overall wellness. To get the most from your weight-loss program, start off with herbalife® 21-Day herbal Cleansing Program, then soothe your system with herbalife® herbal Aloe for improved digestion.* Add in herbalife® Active Fiber Complex for regularity, and herbalife® Florafiber for friendly bacteria, contributing to overall digestive health.* digestible fActs • The small intestine is where the majority of digestion and absorption of nutrients takes place.† • The health of your digestive system can significantly affect your immune function. • A majority of Americans consume only about 14 grams of fiber per day, while the Institute of Medicine recommends 38 grams for men under age 50, and 25 grams for women in the same age group.† cleAnsing And nutrient Absorption In your everyday life, your body may be exposed to toxins. Maintaining your digestive health can help your body neutralize and eliminate them from your system. Supporting your body’s ability to absorb nutrients and eliminate toxins enhances your weight-loss efforts. Improve your body’s nutrient absorption and healthy elimination, and you’ll see how your health and weight loss improves overall.

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. †Source:

Body: The Complete Human (2007) by national geographic

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SECTION FIVE: Week 6: Digestive health

QUIZ: WHAT DO YOU KNOW ABOUT DIGESTIVE HEALTH? 1. About how long is the digestive tract in the average adult (from where the food goes in, to where it comes out)? a. 5 feet b. 12 feet c. 30 feet d. 100 feet 2. on average, how long does it take for food to move through the stomach and small intestine? a. 2 days b. 6 to 8 hours c. 24 hours d. 20 minutes 3. which of the following foods would be most likely to cause heartburn? a. Chocolate, tomato juice and mint b. Chili peppers, lemon and ginger c. Beer, chips and guacamole d. grapefruit, pickles and cheese 4. how much saliva does your body produce per day? a. About ½ cup b. About 1 cup c. 1 to 2 cups d. 2 to 6 cups 5. you would be considered constipated if: a. You go longer than a day without a bowel movement b. You don’t have a bowel movement after each meal c. Your stools are hard and difficult to pass d. You don’t have a bowel movement at the same time each day 6. indigestion: a. Is a general term for an upset stomach b. Can include symptoms like heartburn, nausea, burping and bloating c. Can be aggravated by stress d. All of the above 78

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SECTION FIVE: Week 6: Digestive health

7. About how much food does the average person eat in a year? a. 1,100 pounds b. 400 pounds c. 2,500 pounds d. 800 pounds 8. Most ulcers are caused by: a. eating too many spicy foods on an empty stomach b. A bacterial infection in the lining of the stomach c. obesity d. Drinking too much soda 9. the average human stomach can hold about 5 cups of food at a time. but competitive eaters can consume significantly more. how many hot dogs (with buns) did winner Joey chestnut consume in 12 minutes at the 2007 nathan’s famous fourth of July international hot dog eating contest on coney island? a. 66 b. 37 c. 42 d. 150 10. irritable bowel syndrome (ibs) is difficult to diagnose because: a. Symptoms can vary from person to person b. It strikes more men than women, and men go to the doctor less often c. It can cause diarrhea or constipation d. It’s the same thing as lactose intolerance e. Both a and c

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SECTION FIVE: Week 6: Digestive health

ANSWER KEY: WHAT DO YOU KNOW ABOUT DIGESTIVE HEALTH? 1. About how long is the digestive tract in the average adult (from where the food goes in, to where it comes out)? a. 5 feet b. 12 feet c. 30 feet d. 100 feet 2. on average, how long does it take for food to move through the stomach and small intestine? a. 2 days b. 6 to 8 hours c. 24 hours d. 20 minutes 3. which of the following foods would be most likely to cause heartburn? a. Chocolate, tomato juice and mint b. Chili peppers, lemon and ginger c. Beer, chips and guacamole d. grapefruit, pickles and cheese 4. how much saliva does your body produce per day? a. About ½ cup b. About 1 cup c. 1 to 2 cups d. 2 to 6 cups 5. you would be considered constipated if: a. You go longer than a day without a bowel movement b. You don’t have a bowel movement after each meal c. Your stools are hard and difficult to pass d. You don’t have a bowel movement at the same time each day 6. indigestion: a. Is a general term for an upset stomach b. Can include symptoms like heartburn, nausea, burping and bloating c. Can be aggravated by stress d. All of the above 80

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SECTION FIVE: Week 6: Digestive health

7. About how much food does the average person eat in a year? a. 1,100 pounds b. 400 pounds c. 2,500 pounds d. 800 pounds 8. Most ulcers are caused by: a. eating too many spicy foods on an empty stomach b. A bacterial infection in the lining of the stomach c. obesity d. Drinking too much soda 9. the average human stomach can hold about 5 cups of food at a time. but competitive eaters can consume significantly more. how many hot dogs (with buns) did winner Joey chestnut consume in 12 minutes at the 2007 nathan’s famous fourth of July international hot dog eating contest on coney island? a. 66 b. 37 c. 42 d. 150 10. irritable bowel syndrome (or ibs) is difficult to diagnose because: a. Symptoms can vary from person to person b. It strikes more men than women, and men go to the doctor less often c. It can cause diarrhea or constipation d. It’s the same thing as lactose intolerance e. Both a and c

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SECTION FIVE: Week 6: Digestive health

DIGEST THIS! By Luigi Gratton, M.D., M.P.H.

q: why is digestive heAlth so vAluAble? A: Most people have experienced digestive issues at some point in their lives. Many modern diets lack the sufficient nutrition, such as fiber, for good digestive health. Fiber is essential for weight management and intestinal health but most people only eat half the recommended daily dietary fiber intake. q: whAt cAn i do to increAse My fiber intAke? A: I always encourage people to eat five to seven servings of fruits and vegetables each day to get their daily fiber intake. But I realize how challenging it is to do that with our modern diet and on-the-go lifestyle. That is why I recommend taking supplements that contribute to promoting regularity, a feeling of fullness and the growth of “friendly” intestinal bacteria. q: how does herbAlife ® herbAl Aloe proMote digestive heAlth? A: herbalife’s herbal Aloe formula is gentle and soothing because we filter out the laxative stimulant, alloin, to produce an herbal Aloe with all of the organic nutrients of the aloe plant. The aloe plant contains over 75 substances known for their healing properties. herbal Aloe soothes the stomach, relieves occasional indigestion and supports the immune system.* To maintain a healthy digestive system, support your healthy diet with plenty of fiber and herbalife’s other Digestive health products, such as Active Fiber Complex, Florafiber and 21-Day herbal Cleansing Program.

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

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SECTION FIVE: Week 7: Dining out

DINING-OUT GUIDE

Appetizers enjoy vegetable-based soups, steamed seafood or fresh juice. Try to avoid the fried, cheesy and/or creamy appetizers. breAd And rolls Try choosing whole-grain or rye breads without butter. limit your bread consumption by asking your server to remove the basket from the table. Alcohol Alcoholic beverages are often the source of many additional calories. • Wine, 6 oz., 120 calories • Beer, 12 oz., 146 calories • Screwdriver, 6 oz., 150 calories • Tequila sunrise, 6 oz., 210 calories • Margarita, 8 oz., 400 calories To cut calories try seltzer or light beer. low fAt Steamed, broiled, baked, roasted, boiled, wine sauce, grilled, stir-fried, poached high fAt Fried, sautéed, batter dipped, creamed, cream sauce, cheese sauce, marinated in oil, special sauce, crispy sAlAds Can be the source of a lot of hidden fat and calories. Try ordering light dressing served on the side. Beware of high-fat extras like bacon, cheese, cold cuts and mayonnaise-based salads. Avoid the crusts and shells that some salads are served in. entrees Choose meat dishes with portion sizes of 6 ounces or less. Fish and poultry breast have fewer calories than red meats. Ask your waitperson to serve the entrée without butter, margarine, sour cream or cheese topping, and order sauces on the side.

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SECTION FIVE: Week 7: Dining out

DINING-OUT GUIDE (CONTINUED)

dessert Desserts can make or break a meal. Sidestep high-calorie desserts by choosing fresh fruit or sorbet, or have a decaf coffee or some herbal tea. tips • • •

for success have an apple or glass of water before leaving for the restaurant to curb your appetite. Alcohol may stimulate your appetite. limit your consumption. have your server remove your plate as soon as you are finished.

Remember that you do not have to finish everything on your plate; ask for a doggie bag. You can also ask that half your food be put in a doggie bag before it is served to you – then you can still finish your food and have the rest for the next day. ordering guidelines • Request food to be baked, broiled, steamed, poached or grilled instead of fried. • Try ordering two appetizers, or a soup and salad, instead of an entrée. • Split a large meal with a companion, and order an extra salad or vegetable. • Portions are large, so avoid the temptation to clean your plate; ask for a doggie bag. • Ask that sauces and gravies be served on the side. • Ask questions about meal-preparation techniques if you are unsure. • Ask that the chef prepare your meal in wine rather than butter or oil. • order double portions of vegetables to replace rice or potatoes. cooking Methods example: • 10 oz. potato, 200 calories • 10 oz. baked potato, 235 calories with one pat butter • large french fries, 400 calories • large baked potato with chili and cheese, 630 calories Following these guidelines can help you make changes that will allow you to incorporate new eating habits into your lifestyle. The more consistent you are with your changes, the better your chance at achieving your goals.

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SECTION FIVE: Week 7: Dining out

FAST-FOOD FRENZY

For many of us, when we go out to eat, it’s tempting to let our guard down a bit. Sometimes we think, “I paid for it, so I’m going to eat it,” or we reward ourselves for a hard or difficult day. But if you eat out fairly often, your choices can definitely impact your overall diet. Take a look at the examples below, and see how you can save fat and calories at some of your favorite places. This week’s tip is to help you make healthier decisions when eating out. By looking at the chart below, you can see how you can replace high-fat foods with some lower-calorie alternatives. You can try some similar changes at your favorite places, and many chain restaurants even list their nutrition information online to help you plan ahead. Just because it’s fast food doesn’t mean it has to be unhealthy.

FAST-FOOD RESTAURANT

IF YOU CHOOSE:

YOU WOULD BE EATING:

IF INSTEAD YOU CHOSE:

YOU WOULD BE EATING:

AND YOU WOULD BE SAVING:

Mexican fresh grill

Chicken tostada and a large soda

Calories: 1,340 Fat: 55 grams (That’s 11 teaspoons of fat)

Two broiled chicken Baja-style tacos with veggie mix + iced tea or water

Calories: 510 Fat: 16 grams

Calories: 830 Fat: 39 grams

Sandwich shop or deli

12-inch cheese steak sandwich topped with chipotle sauce + regular chips + a drink

Calories: 1,400 Fat: 60 grams (That’s ¼ cup of fat)

6-inch ham sandwich + grilled chicken and baby spinach salad with Calories: 685 fat-free Italian dressing + baked chips Fat:10 grams + iced tea, water or diet soda

Calories: 715 Fat: 50 grams

Burger place

One double burger with cheese + large fries + large drink

Calories: 1,690 Fat: 85 grams (That’s 1/3 cup of fat)

Garden salad topped with grilled chicken and one-half packet of lite Italian dressing + water, iced tea or diet soda

Calories: 354 Fat: 14 grams

Calories: 1,336 Fat: 71 grams

Italian

Calories: 1,390 One slice cheese pizza + Fat: 50 grams one slice pepperoni pizza + (That’s 10 teaspoons soda of fat)

One slice fresh mushroom pizza + garden salad with light dressing + fruit salad

Calories: 590 Fat: 20 grams

Calories: 800 Fat: 30 grams

Chinese

Two-item combo with sweet and sour pork, orange chicken, chow mein + a soda

Chicken with string beans + mixed vegetables + one-half order steamed rice + hot and sour soup

Calories: 510 Fat: 13 grams

Calories: 980 Fat: 49 grams

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Calories: 1,490 Fat: 62 grams (That’s more than 4 tablespoons of fat)

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SECTION FIVE: Week 7: Dining out

QUIZ: THE INS AND OUTS OF DINING OUT

The questions below ask you to picture yourself in different settings and determine what would be the best selection in each case. 1. you are at your favorite Mexican restaurant. which item would be the best choice? a. A taco salad b. A vegetable quesadilla c. grilled chicken soft tacos with salsa and guacamole 2. you are meeting a friend for coffee. you decide to skip breakfast so you can get something to eat at the coffeehouse. what would be your best choice? a. A low-fat muffin and some nonfat hot cocoa b. half a toasted bagel with light cream cheese and a small nonfat latte c. A slice of coffee cake and black coffee 3. you are in a hurry and have to stop at the nearest burger drive-through window. what would be your best choice? a. A fish sandwich without mayonnaise and a diet soda b. A hamburger with mustard and ketchup only, iced tea and a soft-serve kiddie ice cream cone c. A green salad with two packets of ranch dressing and iced tea 4. the snack machine at work is calling to you. what would be the best selection? a. A bag of baked potato chips b. A cereal bar c. A bag of trail mix 5. you’ve had a busy day of shopping at the mall, and the chinese food at the food court smells so good. which would be the best choice? a. Stir-fried vegetable chow mein b. Beef and broccoli with half a bowl of steamed rice c. Two egg rolls and a bowl of wonton soup

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SECTION FIVE: Week 7: Dining out

6. you are taking some calorie-conscious friends out to dinner. where would you be most likely to find the most healthy selections? a. A greek restaurant b. A French restaurant c. An Indian restaurant 7. the appetizer offerings at your favorite steakhouse all sound good, but which of the following would be the best one to start your meal in a healthy way? a. Chicken wings with barbecue sauce b. Spinach dip with melba toast c. Sliced tomatoes and mozzarella with basil 8. you’ve had a pretty healthy meal for a special dinner out with friends, so you decide to have dessert. which of these would have the fewest calories? a. A slice of strawberry cheesecake b. A scoop of ice cream with berries and a drizzle of chocolate syrup c. A slice of carrot cake 9. you’re on a vacation, and it’s time to hit the breakfast buffet at the hotel. what would be the best meal for you? a. Two large pancakes with no butter – just syrup – and a glass of orange juice b. Two scrambled eggs with diced ham and some fresh fruit c. A bowl of granola topped with raisins and low-fat milk and a glass of cranberry juice 10. you are at a potluck barbecue, and there is a huge array of side dishes to accompany the barbecued chicken. you want to sample three. which of the following groups would make the best choice? a. Fruit salad, potato salad and traditional cole slaw b. Cucumbers in vinaigrette dressing, baked beans and grilled peppers c. Barbecued corn, creamed spinach and chopped salad with Thousand Island dressing

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SECTION FIVE: Week 7: Dining out

ANSWER KEY: THE INS AND OUTS OF DINING OUT The questions below ask you to picture yourself in different settings and determine what would be the best selection in each case. 1. you are at your favorite Mexican restaurant. which item would be the best choice? a. A taco salad b. A vegetable quesadilla c. grilled chicken soft tacos with salsa and guacamole The best choice would be the grilled chicken soft tacos. A taco salad typically has a fried tortilla as the base or the shell to contain the contents, which can add several hundred calories. Even if you don’t eat the shell, the salads are often loaded with cheese, sour cream and salad dressing. A vegetable quesadilla may sound healthy, but the large flour tortilla has about 350 calories, and 3 ounces of shredded cheese adds another 300. The vegetables are likely grilled in oil, so the whole quesadilla could cost you over 800 calories. 2. you are meeting a friend for coffee. you decide to skip breakfast so you can get something to eat at the coffeehouse. what would be your best choice? a. A low-fat muffin and some nonfat hot cocoa b. half a toasted bagel with light cream cheese and a small nonfat latte c. A slice of coffee cake and black coffee Don’t be fooled by the low-fat label. Many low-fat baked goods have just as many calories as traditional items – they often have less fat but a lot more sugar to make them taste good. Typical muffins can run almost 500 calories because they are so huge, and the nonfat cocoa still packs a lot of calories because of the sugar. A slice of coffee cake and black coffee sounds light because it’s relatively small, but it could still run you at least 400 calories. A half a bagel with light cream cheese is only about 200 calories, and the latte would give you some healthy protein for about another 90 to 100 calories, so this would be the best choice.

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SECTION FIVE: Week 7: Dining out

3. you are in a hurry and have to stop at the nearest burger drive-through window. what would be your best choice? a. A fish sandwich without mayonnaise and a diet soda b. A hamburger with mustard and ketchup only, iced tea and a soft-serve kiddie ice cream cone c. A green salad with two packets of ranch dressing and iced tea Some people think that fish is better than beef, regardless of how it is cooked. In most fast-food places, the fish is fried, so the calories are really high. Your best bet of the three selections above would be the plain burger and the small soft-serve cone. Why not the green salad? The salad itself has a low calorie count, but without any protein in it, you’ll be hungry in no time. Add two packets of dressing, which is four servings, and you’ve just dumped about 350 calories of fat on your meal. The burger meal with the kiddie cone adds up to only about 300 calories. 4. the snack machine at work is calling to you. what would be the best selection? a. A bag of baked potato chips b. A cereal bar c. A bag of trail mix A half a cup of trail mix can log in at about 400 calories, even though it sounds healthy. The nuts and raisins add up quickly – and if you toss chocolate chips and banana chips (which are fried) into the mix, the calories climb. Baked potato chips run about 110 calories an ounce, which would be less than the cereal bar at 140 calories per bar, but if the chip bag contains more than an ounce of chips, the cereal bar would be a better bet. 5. you’ve had a busy day of shopping at the mall, and the chinese food at the food court smells so good. which would be the best choice? a. Stir-fried vegetable chow mein b. Beef and broccoli with half a bowl of steamed rice c. Two egg rolls and a bowl of wonton soup Beef and broccoli would be your best bet. Stir-fried vegetable chow mein is loaded with oil and the calories in all those noodles add up quickly. Two egg rolls and a cup of wonton soup sounds like a light meal, but the fried egg rolls are about 350 calories and the soup about the same – a total of 700 calories for such a small meal. Beef and broccoli with steamed rice will have fewer calories and much more nutrition than either of the other choices.

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SECTION FIVE: Week 7: Dining out

ANSWER KEY: THE INS AND OUT OF DINING OUT (CONTINUED) 6. you are taking some calorie-conscious friends out to dinner. where would you be most likely to find the most healthy selections? a. A greek restaurant b. A French restaurant c. An Indian restaurant Your best bet here would likely be the Greek restaurant. Mediterranean restaurants generally have good offerings in the way of fish dishes, vegetables and salads. French food is notoriously rich; Indian food may seem healthy because of its emphasis on vegetarian dishes, but there is often a lot of butter and cream lurking in the curry dishes. 7. the appetizer offerings at your favorite steakhouse all sound good, but which of the following would be the best one to start your meal in a healthy way? a. Chicken wings with barbecue sauce b. Spinach dip with melba toast c. Sliced tomatoes and mozzarella with basil Even though you’ll be consuming a little cheese with your tomato salad, this is still your best bet of the three. Mozzarella is a low-fat cheese, and the sliced tomatoes add very few calories to this dish. Don’t be fooled into thinking that the dip is healthy because it contains spinach. The dish is loaded with all kinds of rich and creamy ingredients and is very high calorie. Similarly, chicken wings – while small – are usually fried, and the portions are generous. 8. you’ve had a pretty healthy meal for a special dinner out with friends, so you decide to have dessert. which of these would have the fewest calories? a. A slice of strawberry cheesecake b. A scoop of ice cream with berries and a drizzle of chocolate syrup c. A slice of carrot cake The ice cream is actually your best choice here. The portion is relatively small, and chocolate syrup has only about 50 calories per tablespoon. The dessert seems special, but has fewer calories than the other two. In most restaurants, carrot cake has even more calories than cheesecake, which is already very high in calories. Carrot cake sounds healthy, but it’s loaded with oil and is typically frosted with sweetened cream cheese.

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SECTION FIVE: Week 7: Dining out

9. you’re on a vacation, and it’s time to hit the breakfast buffet at the hotel. what would be the best meal for you? a. Two large pancakes with no butter – just syrup – and a glass of orange juice b. Two scrambled eggs with diced ham and some fresh fruit c. A bowl of granola topped with raisins and low-fat milk and a glass of cranberry juice Don’t be fooled by the healthy sounding granola. Some are as high as 450 calories a cup, so unless you really control portions, you’ll be running up a hefty calorie bill by the time you add raisins (at 30 calories a tablespoon), low-fat milk for 120 calories, and cranberry juice at 160 calories per 8 oz. glass. The pancakes and orange juice breakfast could cost you nearly 600 calories, and with almost no protein in the meal, you’ll be hungry an hour later. Ham is a relatively lean meat to add to the scrambled eggs, and the fresh fruit will add bulk to your meal and keep you full, so the egg breakfast is the best choice. 10. you are at a potluck barbecue, and there is a huge array of side dishes to accompany the barbecued chicken. you want to sample three. which of the following groups would make the best choice? a. Fruit salad, potato salad and traditional cole slaw b. Cucumbers in vinaigrette dressing, baked beans and grilled peppers c. Barbecued corn, creamed spinach and chopped salad with Thousand Island dressing The best choice would be choice (b). The first grouping contains fruit, which is great, but potato salad and traditional cole slaw are loaded with mayonnaise and calories. In choice (c), the barbecued corn is a good selection, but the creamy spinach and salad with creamy dressing turn these healthy vegetables into big loads of fat. Choice (b) offers a good range of nutritious foods – the cucumbers in vinaigrette are relatively low calorie, as are the grilled peppers. The baked beans are low in fat, high in fiber and contain some protein, too – making this group the best choice.

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SECTION FIVE: Week 8: Fiber

THE FIBER FACTOR By Susan Bowerman, M.S., R.D., C.S.S.D.

More than 100 years ago, someone figured out how to separate the bran from grains of wheat, leaving only the starchy interior to be ground into flour. From this discovery, an amazing new product – white bread – was born. But the introduction of refined flour products certainly contributed to the nation’s slow decline in dietary fiber intake. It has been estimated that our hunter-gatherer ancestors – who foraged for food for hours every day – ate about 12 pounds of plant foods a day and about 100 grams of fiber. If we did that, we’d spend a good part of our day just eating. But the average American falls far short of meeting the fiber recommendation of 25 to 30 grams a day. In fact, most of us only eat about 15 grams. Fiber is the structural portion of a plant, and so it is found in whole fruits, vegetables, beans and grains (like corn and brown rice); there is no fiber in meats, fish or poultry. Different types of fibers have different effects on the body, and it’s important to get plenty of fiber from a variety of sources. Water-soluble fibers are found in the highest concentration in apples, oranges, carrots, potatoes, oats, barley and beans. These types of fiber delay the time it takes for food to pass through the system, and so they provide a feeling of fullness. They also slow the absorption of glucose (sugar) from the bloodstream and so they help to keep blood-sugar levels more even throughout the day. This type of fiber is also helpful in lowering blood cholesterol levels, which is why oats and oat bran have been popular for heart health. Water-insoluble fibers are found in the highest concentrations in vegetables, wheat bran, corn bran, rice bran and most other whole grains. These fibers speed up the transfer of food through the intestines and also trap water, so they are particularly good in helping to prevent constipation. The health benefits of a high-fiber diet are numerous. Most people are aware that fiber keeps the intestinal tract functioning smoothly. The fiber not only helps prevent constipation, but also reduces the risk of hemorrhoids. For those wanting to lose weight, a high-fiber diet is a great way to go. Fruits, vegetables and whole grains have fewer calories “per bite” than do foods that have a lot of fat and sugar. Also, the fibers keep food in the stomach longer and absorb water, so they provide the sensation of fullness. Can you get too much? Adding too much fiber to the diet in a short period of time might lead to abdominal discomfort and gas, so if your diet is usually low in fiber, increase the amount slowly over a few weeks to give your system time to adjust. Also, drink plenty of liquid to allow the fiber to soften and swell. And make sure to eat a variety of fiber sources to reap all the health benefits that high-fiber foods provide.

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SECTION FIVE: Week 8: Fiber

Tips for Increasing Fiber Intake • • • • • • • • • • • •

Eat whole fruits with skin more often than drinking fruit juices. Use whole fruit as a dessert. Eat a variety of whole vegetables – cooked and raw – and eat them freely. Use whole-grain cereals, oatmeal and bran cereals more often than refined cereals, like cream of wheat or corn flakes. Use 100% whole-grain breads, waffles, rolls, English muffins and crackers instead of those made with white flour. Try whole-grain pasta. Use corn tortillas rather than flour. Use brown rice, wild rice, millet, barley and cracked wheat as alternatives to white rice. Add beans to main-dish soups, stews, chili or salads. Add wheat bran or oat bran to meat loaves or meatballs. For snacks, use whole-grain pretzels, popcorn or low-fat bran muffins as alternatives to cakes, cookies and chips. If you have trouble meeting your fiber intake, you can use fiber supplements. But remember that fiber supplements don’t replace the healthy fruits, vegetables and whole grains that you should be consuming.

FIBER CONTENT OF SOME HIGH-FIBER FOODS FOOD ITEM

PORTION

CALORIES

FIBER (GRAMS)

Blackberries

1 cup

75

8

Blueberries

1 cup

110

5

Orange

1 large

85

4

Red apple

1 medium

100

4

Red pear

1 medium

100

4

Strawberries

1 cup

50

4

Broccoli, cooked

1 cup

45

5

Carrots, cooked

1 cup

70

5

Spinach, cooked

1 cup

40

4

Turnip greens, cooked

1 cup

30

5

Winter squash, baked

1 cup

70

7

Cooked beans

½ cup, cooked

115–140

5–7

Lentils

½ cup, cooked

115

8

90–120

15–18

1 cup, cooked

130

4

3 crackers

75

5

High-fiber bran cereal

2/3

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SECTION FIVE: Week 8: Fiber

EAT YOUR FRUITS AND VEGGIES By Luigi Gratton, M.D., M.P.H.

When our mothers told us, “Eat your fruits and veggies,” they were right. They are an essential part of our diet, providing a wide range of vitamins and minerals that serve an array of important functions in the body. Many people, however, are still deficient in their fruit and vegetable intake. NOT GETTING THE MESSAGE Over the last several years, the U.S. Department of Health has recommended eating at least five portions of fruits and vegetables a day. Yet, only 1-in-7 achieve this quota. In fact, one-third of American adults eat only two servings of fruits and vegetables a day and are four times more likely to choose a processed snack instead. On any given day, about half the population eats no fruit at all. A BUSHEL OF REASONS There is a rainbow of reasons to eat a variety of colors from the produce aisle. Fruits and vegetables are virtually fat-free, low in salt and an excellent source of fiber. Some fruits and vegetables, such as carrots and cantaloupe, provide Vitamin A, which maintains eye health and immunity. Other fruits and vegetables, such as bananas and spinach, contain potassium, which is necessary for proper nerve and muscle functioning. green vegetables, such as broccoli and asparagus, provide B vitamins, which are necessary for converting food into energy. But all fruits and vegetables contain phytonutrients, the health-promoting components of plants. Scientific studies show that phytonutrients can help protect seven key organs, including the eyes, heart, liver and skin, and they may also serve as antioxidants. ANTIOXIDANT PROTECTION Current research has measured the total antioxidant power of various foods, citing fruits and vegetables at the top of the list. Antioxidants protect our bodies from free radicals that can cause damage to cellular membranes. Antioxidants also boost our immunity, help make our muscles stronger and support bone and skin health. Since eating the recommended daily servings of antioxidant-rich fruits and vegetables is not always realistic, try supplementing your diet with appropriate products. Herbalife® garden 7® dietary supplement protects your health with the powerful phytonutrient and antioxidant benefits found in seven servings of colorful fruits and vegetables.* It also supports your body’s vital organs by providing them with key nutrients.* So, try to get in the habit of eating plenty of produce each day. It’s one of the biggest favors you can do for your body.

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

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SECTION FIVE: Week 8: Fiber

FRUITS AND VEGETABLES Add Color to Your Life By Susan Bowerman, M.S., R.D., C.S.S.D.

Color-coding can be a useful device to introduce diversity into the diet. The different colors are important because the different plant chemicals they represent have different effects on the body. There are two purposes for this classification. First, it is meant to increase the diversity of the plant foods you eat. Second, it groups these according to mechanisms that the phytochemicals in each group provide. By eating regularly from each group, you will obtain a rich group of phytochemicals to help promote good health. And remember not to overdo a good thing: Fruits and vegetables have a lot of nutrients per serving, so always be sure to keep portion size reasonable.

COLOR GROUP

PREVENTIVE BENEFITS*

FOODS

Red (lycopene)

Prostate and lung cancer Heart disease Antioxidant

Tomatoes, pasta sauce, tomato soup, tomato-based juices (spicy or regular) and ketchup; pink grapefruit, guava and watermelon

Red/Purple (anthocyanidins, resveratrol)

Protects DNA Antioxidant Anticancer

Grapes, cranberries, blueberries, blackberries, strawberries, pomegranate, plums and cherries

Orange (alpha- and beta-carotene)

Antioxidant Anticancer

Carrots, mangos, apricots, winter squash, cantaloupe, pumpkin, acorn squash and sweet potatoes

Orange/Yellow (terpenoids, Vitamin C)

Antioxidant Anticancer Heart disease

Oranges, tangerines, yellow grapefruit, lemon, lime, peaches, papaya and pineapple; zest of lemon, lime and orange

Yellow/Green (lutein)

Vision Anticancer Heart disease

Spinach, avocado, collard, mustard or turnip greens, green peas, green beans, green peppers, yellow peppers, cucumber and kiwi

Green (glucosinolates)

Anticancer Heart disease

Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, kale, cauliflower, Chinese cabbage or bok choy

White/Green (allyl sulfides)

Circulation Blood pressure

Garlic, onions, leeks, celery, asparagus, artichoke, endive and chives

Adapted from: What Color is Your Diet? By David Heber and Susan Bowerman, new York: HarperCollins, 2001 *These benefits are potential and based on the current understanding of science in these areas. Also the various fruits and vegetables in each group have multiple compounds that work together to provide some of these benefits. Only the major ones are used to form the groupings.

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SECTION FIVE: Week 8: Fiber

RIPE FOR THE PICKING

FOOD

SELECTION

Artichoke

Choose plump heads with tightly closed leaves, heavy for size. Refrigerate in plastic bag up to 1 week. Keep dry to prevent mold growth. Pull back one leaf to check heart for black blemishes. You can freeze cooked, but not raw, artichokes.

Asparagus

Avoid limp or wilted stalks. Choose odorless stalks with dry, tight tips.

Trim stems, wash and dry thoroughly. Wrap stem ends in a wet paper towel, and refrigerate in a plastic bag for up to 4 days.

Bell peppers

Choose firm, brightly colored peppers with tight skin that are heavy for their size. Avoid dull, shriveled or pitted peppers.

Store unwashed peppers in the refrigerator in a plastic bag for use within 5 days. If it gets a small moldy spot, you can cut out the moldy spot and use the rest of the pepper. You can also slice or chop peppers, and freeze them in an airtight container.

Broccoli

Choose odorless heads with tight, bluish-green florets.

Mist with water, wrap loosely in damp paper towels, refrigerate and use within 3 to 5 days. Don’t store in a sealed plastic bag.

Brussels sprouts

Choose firm, compact, bright-green heads. Buy on stalk when possible.

Refrigerate unwashed Brussels sprouts in an unsealed plastic bag up to 1 week.

Cabbage

Choose heads with compact leaves that are heavy for their size.

Refrigerate unwashed cabbage in an unsealed plastic bag for up to 7 days.

Carrots

Choose well-shaped, smooth, firm, crisp carrots with deep color Refrigerate in an unsealed plastic bag with tops removed up to 2 weeks. and fresh, green tops. Avoid soft, wilted or split carrots.

Cauliflower

Choose cauliflower with compact, creamy-white curds and bright-green, firmly attached leaves. Avoid brown spots or loose sections that are spread out.

Refrigerate in loose plastic bag up to 5 days.

Celery

Choose straight, rigid stalks with fresh leaves. Avoid pithy, woody or limp stalks.

Refrigerate in plastic bag or wrap in foil for 1 week or more.

Corn

Choose ears with green husks, fresh silks and tight rows of kernels.

Refrigerate with husks on for use as soon as possible, or within 1 to 2 days.

Cucumber

Choose firm, well-shaped cucumbers with dark green color, heavy for size.

Refrigerate in a loose plastic bag up to 1 week.

Eggplant

Choose fruits that are smooth, unwrinkled, and heavy for their size. The flesh should feel springy and bounce back when pressed.

Eggplant bruises easily and is quite perishable. Store in a loose plastic bag in the refrigerator for 1 to 2 days.

Green beans

Choose fresh, well-colored beans that snap easily when bent. Refrigerate unwashed beans in a loose plastic bag, use within 1 week.

Green onions

Choose stalks with fresh, green tops and slightly white ends.

Refrigerate in a loose plastic bag for use as soon as possible.

Iceberg lettuce

Choose heads with fresh, clean outer leaves and compact inner leaves.

Rinse head upon purchase; dry on paper towels. Refrigerate in a loose plastic bag for use within 1 week. Don’t store with apples, pears or bananas.

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SECTION FIVE: Week 8: Fiber

FOOD

SELECTION

STORAGE

Leaf lettuce

Choose lettuce with crisp leaves. Avoid brown edges.

After purchase, rinse well, dry with paper towels or in a salad spinner. Refrigerate in plastic bag up to 1 week. Don’t store with apples, pears or bananas.

Mushrooms

Choose well-shaped mushrooms with firm texture. Avoid spots and slime

Refrigerate in original container or paper bag up to 1 week.

Onions

Choose onions that are firm and dry with bright, smooth outer skins.

Store whole onions in a cool, dark, well-ventilated place for use within 4 weeks. Refrigerate cut onions in a tightly sealed container for use within 2 to 3 days.

Potatoes

All varieties should be clean, firm, smooth, dry and uniform in size.

Store in a cool, dark, well-ventilated place for use within 3 to 5 weeks

Radishes

Choose smooth, brightly colored, medium-sized radishes. Attached tops should be green and fresh looking.

Refrigerate in plastic bag for use within 1 week. Remove tops before storing.

Spinach

Choose fresh, crisp, green bunches with no evidence of insect damage.

Loosely wrap in damp paper towel. Refrigerate in loose plastic bag for use within 3 to 5 days.

Squash

For all varieties, choose glossy, small- to medium-sized squash, heavy for size.

Refrigerate for use within 3 to 4 days.

Tomatoes

Choose tomatoes with bright, shiny skins and firm flesh.

Store at room temperature away from direct sunlight; use within 1 week after ripe.

Apples

Choose firm, shiny, smooth-skinned applies with intact stems. Refrigerate in plastic bag away from foods with a strong odor. Use within Should smell fresh, not musty. 3 weeks.

Avocado

Choose avocado with firm skin and no soft spots, firm but yielding-to-gentle pressure when ripe.

Store when unripe at room temperature in paper bag; place an apple or banana in the bag to hasten ripening. Refrigerate when ripe for 2 to 3 days.

Bananas

Choose fruit with slight green on stem and tip, firm without bruises. Ripens after harvest.

Store unripe fruit at room temperature. Store ripe fruit in refrigerator for up to 2 weeks; skin may turn black. To freeze, peel the banana, wrap in foil and freeze. Tastes like ice cream!

Blueberries

Choose firm, plump, dry berries with dusty blue color and uniform in size.

Refrigerate for 10 to 14 days. You can also freeze whole blueberries – rinse, pat dry and freeze in an airtight container.

Cantaloupe

Choose fragrant, symmetrical melons, heavy for size with no visible bruises and yellow or cream undertone beneath the webbing. Stem end should give to gentle pressure.

Store uncut at room temperature up to 1 week. Refrigerate cut melon in airtight container up to 5 days. Wash melon before cutting to avoid transfer of surface bacteria to the inside of the fruit.

Cherries

Select firm, red cherries with stems attached. Avoid soft, shriveled or blemished cherries.

Refrigerate for up to 10 days.

Grapefruit

Choose fruits with thin, smooth, firm blemish-free skins that are heavy for their size.

Store at room temperature for 1 week or under refrigeration for 2 to 3 weeks.

Grapes

Choose plump, firm fruits that are firmly attached to the stem.

Store in a loose plastic bag in the refrigerator for up to 1 week.

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SECTION FIVE: Week 8: Fiber

RIPE FOR THE PICKING (CONTINUED)

FOOD

SELECTION

STORAGE

Honeydew melon

Choose well-shaped fruits that are nearly spherical. Should have a waxy, not fuzzy, surface and feel heavy for size. They should be fragrant.

Store in refrigerator for up to 2 weeks. Wash melon before cutting to avoid transfer of surface bacteria to the inside of the fruit.

Kiwi

Choose slightly firm fruit with a rough, fuzzy skin.

Store unripened fruit in plastic bags under refrigeration for up to 6 weeks.

Lemon, limes

Choose lemons and limes with firm, thin, smooth skin, heavy for size.

Refrigerate up to 2 weeks.

Mango

Choose slightly firm mangos with sweet aroma. Avoid sap on skin.

Store at room temperature 1 to 2 days. Refrigerate peeled, cut mangos.

Nectarine

Choose firm nectarines with smooth skin.

Store unripe in paper bag until ripe, then store at room temperature for use within 2 to 3 days.

Orange

Choose oranges with firm, smooth skins, heavy for size.

Store at room temperature for 1 to 2 days. Refrigerate for 1 to 2 weeks.

Peach

Choose peaches with firm, fuzzy skins that yield to gentle pressure when ripe. Avoid blemishes.

Store unripe peaches in paper bag. When ripe, store at room temperature for use within 1 to 2 days.

Pear

Choose firm fruit, then check the neck for ripeness daily by applying gentle pressure to the stem end of the pear with your thumb. When it yields to the pressure, it’s ready to eat.

Store unripe pears in paper bag at room temperature. Refrigerate ripe pears.

Pineapple

Choose pineapples with dark-green leaves, heavy for size. Avoid soft or dark spots and dry-looking leaves.

Eat as soon as possible. Refrigerate cut pineapple for 2 to 3 days. Wash fruit before cutting to avoid transfer of surface bacteria to the inside of the fruit.

Plum

Choose plump plums with smooth skins. Avoid bruises and soft spots.

Store unripe plums in paper bag until ripe. Refrigerate ripe plums.

Raspberries

Choose dry, plump, firm berries. Avoid wet or moldy berries.

Do not wash until ready to eat. Refrigerate for use within 1 to 2 days.

Strawberries

Choose shiny, firm fruit with a bright-red color. Caps should be fresh, green and intact. Avoid shriveled, mushy or leaky berries.

Do not wash until ready to eat. Store in refrigerator for 1 to 3 days.

Tangerine

Choose firm to semi-soft tangerines with deep orange color, heavy for size. Avoid soft spots and dull or brown color.

Refrigerate up to 2 weeks.

Watermelon

Choose symmetrical watermelons with dried stems and yellowish undersides, heavy for size with a hard rind.

Store whole watermelons at room temperature. Refrigerate cut watermelons in airtight container for use within 5 days. Wash melon before cutting to avoid transfer of surface bacteria to the inside of the fruit.

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SECTION FIVE: Week 9: Sugar

SURROUNDED BY SUGAR By Luigi Gratton, M.D., M.P.H.

I always encourage my patients, when shopping, to avoid sugar and, instead, look for protein. Since we live in a carbohydrate-rich society, it’s not always easy to find low-calorie, healthful foods, which are generally expensive and have a short shelf life. This is all too obvious when traveling. Whether it’s the airport or a gas station, high-protein foods that are low in sugar are difficult to find. The next time you walk into a gas station, a food stop or a snack bar in the airport, look around. You will see lots of chips, candies, crackers, doughnuts, muffins and plenty of soda. generally, the only protein is beef jerky, almonds and milk. now protein bars are coming into fashion, but they are not widespread. The problem with snacking on these sugary foods is the empty calories. You want to make your calories count, and sugar doesn’t help much. Prepackaged foods that are high in sugar generally do not have a high-nutrient density. Protein is the nutrient of interest for most of the current diets. In the 1980s, the high-carbohydrate diet was king, but this diet has proven deleterious to most people. We do need carbohydrates – remember, it’s like the fuel you add in the gas tank of your car – but unless you’re training for a marathon, you do not need that much. generally, about 40 percent to 50 percent of your daily calories can come from carbohydrates, which means that on a 2,000-calorie-per-day diet, that is approximately 800 to 1,000 calories, which translates into the typical Western breakfast of a large latte and a muffin. Under these conditions, you’re usually tapped out by 10 a.m. with all the carbs you need for the day. now imagine adding some pizza, a hamburger and a soda, a mid-afternoon coffee, a bag of chips and then maybe some bread with dinner. It’s not hard to quickly accumulate 4,000 calories. Cutting carbohydrates out of the diet is the basis of most, if not all, of the popular diet programs today. The idea of a low-fat diet has changed, and now a diet rich in healthy fats – such as monounsaturated fats from nuts, avocados and olive oil, and polyunsaturated fats from fish oil and flaxseed – is popular. The percentage for dietary protein can vary widely, but most experts target around 30 percent.

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SECTION FIVE: Week 9: Sugar

SUGAR HIDE-AND-SEEK By Susan Bowerman, M.S., R.D., C.S.S.D.

Say the word “sugar” and most people picture the familiar white granular stuff many of us have in a sugar bowl at home. But what is sugar exactly? Table sugar is just one form of sugar that we get in the diet. Sugars are carbohydrates, and they exist naturally in different forms and in all kinds of foods. The granulated sugar that you might sprinkle on your cereal is called sucrose, which is produced primarily by extracting the sugar from sugar beets or sugar cane, although it is present in lots of other plant foods, too. The primary sugar in fruits is called fructose, and there is a naturally occurring sugar in milk called lactose. When you consume a fruit, a vegetable or a dairy product, you can’t avoid consuming the natural sugar that these foods contain. All sugars ultimately end up in the bloodstream in the form of glucose, which is the form of sugar that our body prefers to use for energy. While sugars in foods end up as glucose in the bloodstream, so do the end-products of the digestion of all carbohydrate-rich foods like fruits, vegetables and starchy foods. The concern about sugar intake from added sugars (not the naturally occurring ones) has mostly to do with the fact that they are considered to be “empty calories” – that is, sugar provides calories (which the body uses for energy) but no vitamins or minerals. So, if you consume a lot of sugary foods instead of healthier items, you are shortchanging yourself by not getting enough of the vitamins, minerals, fiber and healthy phytonutrients that carbohydrate-rich natural foods contain. We eat a lot of sugar – even in foods that don’t taste sweet. Aside from the obvious items like sodas, fruit drinks, sweetened cereals and desserts, sugar – in one form or another – finds its way into condiments, soups, breads and even savory snacks like chips. The primary health hazard of eating too much sugar is tooth decay. The bacteria that live in your mouth can convert sugars into an acid that can destroy tooth enamel. Foods that are sweet and sticky, like fruit snacks or gummy candies, are particularly a problem since the sugar stays in contact with the teeth. Does sugar make you fat? Certainly, sugar adds extra calories to the diet, and extra calories mean extra weight. Most studies have focused on soda consumption, and several have concluded that as soda consumption increases, so does the risk of obesity. Part of the problem with beverages is that they don’t fill us up – so we can consume a lot of calories in these sweet liquids and still consume regular solid foods, too, before we feel full.

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SECTION FIVE: Week 9: Sugar

The other issue is that many foods that are high in added sugars are also high in fats and calories – cakes, pastries, ice cream and candy bars are just some of the sweet foods we eat that are loaded down with fat and calories. Food manufacturers are more than happy to accommodate America’s sweet tooth – sugar is inexpensive and adds a lot of taste to foods. To know how much sugar you are eating, it’s important to understand that many forms of sugar are added to foods. By reading the label, you may not realize how much sugar a food really contains. Here are some other forms of sugar that you might see on a label: sucrose, fructose, glucose, dextrose, lactose, maltose, invert sugar, raw sugar, turbinado sugar, brown sugar, cane sugar, brown rice syrup, fruit juice concentrate, confectioner’s sugar, maltodextrin, corn syrup, high-fructose corn syrup, honey, maple syrup and molasses. One popular breakfast cereal marketed to children has the following ingredients: corn, sugar, corn syrup, modified cornstarch, canola oil and high-fructose corn syrup, followed by some vitamins, minerals, and artificial colors and flavors. This cereal isn’t much more than a bowl of sugar, oil and starch. When you look at a food label, the sugar content is listed – in grams per serving – just under the total carbohydrate listing. But this includes all sugars in the food including natural sugars, so it can be deceptive. For instance, a bran cereal with no added sugar but with raisins in it might look as high in sugar as a sugary kids’ cereal. But there is a big difference in the nutritional value of the two foods, since one might contain only the natural sugar from the fruit, while the kids’ cereal will contain all added sugar. How can you reduce your sugar intake? Try to obtain your sugars naturally – which should be primarily from fresh, whole fruit. • Fruit juices, even if they are 100 percent fruit juice, are all-natural sugar but they are very high in calories – it’s best to avoid beverages with high calories, including fruit juices, sodas, lemonade and other sweetened beverages. Learn to enjoy your iced tea for its natural flavor, rather than for the flavor of the sugar that you pour into the glass. • Rather than adding syrup or honey to foods like waffles or pancakes, try topping them with sliced fresh fruit and a dollop of vanilla yogurt. • Look for whole-grain cereals without added sugars, and top with sliced bananas, berries or other fruit that appeals to you. This applies to both cold cereals and hot. Oatmeal is delicious with some mashed banana stirred in for sweetness. • Keep healthy snacks around, like whole fruits, cut vegetables, whole-grain crackers, low-fat yogurt and low-fat cheese, so you won’t be tempted to eat sweets instead.

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SECTION FIVE: Week 9: Sugar

SUGAR HIDE-AND-SEEK (CONTINUED)



Help your kids develop healthier habits – if they are old enough to read labels, give them a list of all the names for sugar and ask them to become “sugar detectives.” They will enjoy finding the hidden sources of sugar in foods, and it will help to educate them as to how much sugar is added – sometimes where you least expect it. Instead of baked goods for desserts, try fresh fruit with a bit of chocolate syrup. One great trick is to take ripe bananas, peel and place them on a foil-lined tray in the freezer. Frozen bananas taste just like ice cream and will satisfy your sweet tooth for significantly fewer calories. If you add sugar to cereals, beverages and fruits routinely, try to gradually reduce the amount you use. You may not really know the true flavor of these foods because you have “masked” the flavor with sugar. Fresh fruits in season should be deliciously sweet – no added sugar necessary.





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SECTION FIVE: Week 9: Sugar

SIZING UP SUGAR FOR KIDS By Luigi Gratton, M.D., M.P.H.

Sugar is a short-term source of both energy and pleasure. But the fact is, kids today are on sugar overload! According to a study published in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association, kids are getting a staggering 29 teaspoons of refined sugar per day. This overconsumption of sugar is causing a variety of problems and health issues. Currently, about a third of the nation’s children and teens are either overweight or obese, and a highsugar diet is often the cause. Sugar can make it difficult to lose weight because of constantly high insulin levels, which cause the body to store excess carbohydrates as fat. It can also suppress the immune system, cause tooth decay, and even lead to diabetes. What’s more, too much sugar can also result in energy peaks and valleys. HIGHS AND LOWS After sugar consumption, children experience a rapid rise of the stimulant hormone adrenaline, which causes hyperactivity. In fact, a recent study at Yale University School of Medicine revealed that, when ingested by children, sugar releases twice the amount of adrenaline into the bloodstream as it does in adults. Kids then experience a crashing low, as refined sugars break down very quickly in the body, leaving them tired, irritable and unable to concentrate. THE CULPRITS So, which foods contain the most calories from sugar? It all starts with breakfast. Sugar accounts for more than a third of the weight of children’s cereals. They contain about 52 percent more sugar than adult cereals and have less protein and fiber. Another big concern is sugar-sweetened sodas. They are the largest source of added sugar in the daily diets of U.S. children. Each 12 oz. carbonated soft drink contains the equivalent of 10 teaspoons of sugar and 150 calories. And juice-flavored drinks aren’t any better. They often contain as much added sugar as soft drinks and also tend to be high in calories and low in valuable nutrients. So, instead of giving your child sugar-loaded cereals and beverages, offer them healthier alternatives, such as fruit. It’s a naturally sweet snack that also contains fiber and vitamins they need.

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SECTION FIVE: Week 10: Exercise

SHAPE UP YOUR LIFE By Luigi Gratton, M.D., M.P.H.

Anytime is the right time to get outdoors, get in shape and renew our commitment to a healthy lifestyle. Here are some helpful hints to keep in mind as you shape up. 1. TAKE TIME TO WARM UP Spending 5 to 10 minutes warming up prepares your body for exercise. Walk before jogging. Jog before running. Just warm up at a pace that gradually gets your heart beating at 50 to 60 percent of your maximum heart rate. And don’t forget to stretch. Moving from side to side warms your muscles and prepares them for exercise. Warm muscles allow for a greater range of motion for your joints and make injuries less likely as well. 2. THINK VARIETY Have you ever started a fitness program and then let it fizzle out? The reason could have been boredom. A program that includes several fitness activities – for example, walking or biking on Mondays and Wednesdays and playing tennis or swimming on Fridays and Sundays – will help maintain your interest and keep you motivated. need a change of scenery? Try varying the place you exercise with a new route for walking or biking. Having different options can allow you to pick the one that suits your mood and keeps your fitness program feeling fresh. 3. GET YOUR ANTIOXIDANTS Don’t forget about the important role that proper nutrition plays in achieving an active lifestyle. Since exercise can increase the formation of free radicals, it’s always good to have some extra protection. Antioxidants, such as Vitamin C and beta-carotene, may play a role in preventing cellular injury and delaying muscle fatigue. Try to get at least five servings of fruits and vegetables a day, as they are packed with powerful antioxidants. Our targeted nutrition products also provide key antioxidants that protect muscles and joints against exercise-induced oxidative stress. So, remember to add antioxidants to your diet and get the most out of your fitness program.

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SECTION FIVE: Week 10: Exercise

SEVEN WAYS TO LOOK GREAT Target These Major Muscle Groups By Luigi Gratton, M.D., M.P.H.

What is the easiest way to work the whole body? Very simply, I developed what I call “The Simple 7” – the seven main muscle groups we work on throughout the week. The Simple 7 includes: 1. Chest 2. Biceps (front of arms) 3. Triceps (back of arms) 4. Abs (can be worked daily) 5. Back 6. Front of legs 7. Back of legs generally, I split a workout between alternating days: The first day I will work upper body, the next day lower body. Again, work abs every day to help strengthen the core. Doing some healthy cardio means a good 15 minutes of elevated heart rate. There is plenty of evidence to support the notion that 15 minutes of cardio daily has profound impact on heart health. Don’t worry about trying to spend an hour on a treadmill; the added benefit is minimal and may actually work against you. There are approximately 260 muscles in the body. So, why just work on seven, and why these seven? Well, it’s all about getting the most bang for your effort. When exercising, it’s best to work on large muscle groups. It’s as if you are fine-tuning a regular car engine as opposed to an engine in a toy boat. The larger the muscle, the more metabolic benefit, and the bigger the payoff when it comes to weight maintenance. The Simple 7 group consists of the fewest number of muscle groups one has to work on to achieve maximum benefit in an exercise routine. You can exercise with more or less, but if you attack these particular muscles, then you will achieve maximum benefit. Also, it’s important to realize that the body is a balanced machine, and you must work the lower with the upper, and the back with the front. The seven muscle groups provide total balance in an easy way.

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SECTION FIVE: Week 10: Exercise

HOW OFTEN SHOULD YOU WORK OUT? By Luigi Gratton, M.D., M.P.H.

How much you work out depends on your schedule, but I recommend three to five times a week. I work out daily, but I incorporate tremendous variety into my routine for a number of reasons. One reason is to always keep it interesting. Another reason is to move the stress around the body. You don’t want to repeat the same exercise every day, because that will wear on the joints, bones, muscles, tendons and ligaments. I generally recommend splitting up the week. For those of you who can only work out three days a week, which I consider the minimum, either rotate Monday, Wednesday and Friday. Or you can do Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday. This allows one day in between for rest. This rest time gives the body an opportunity to grow and repair from the damage caused by exercise. Within those three days, you can rotate exercises, so Monday would be upper body and abs, Wednesday, lower body and abs, then Friday, upper body and abs again. The following Monday, you could rotate so that Monday is lower body and abs, Wednesday is upper body and abs, and then Friday is lower body and abs again. This allows that necessary rest time between exercises for optimal muscle health. Three days a week is the basic minimum routine. On each day, the workouts should be split between cardio and resistance: 30 minutes of each is perfect. The cardio exercises should be rotated as well, so that Monday is the treadmill, Wednesday is the bike, and Friday is the elliptical. This again allows variety so that you’re not bored, and it spreads the stress around the body’s tissues so as to avoid overuse injuries that are so common. If you prefer to exercise more, then five or even six days a week is recommended. With more days, you can split up your workouts more. For example, Monday, instead of just doing upper body, you do very specific upper body such as chest and biceps with abs. Remember, abs are done every day to strengthen your core. Then Tuesday you could do specific lower body such as quads, calves and abs. going on to Wednesday, you’re back to upper body so that you’re doing upper back, triceps and abs; Thursday, hamstrings and abs. Then Friday you can repeat your Monday workout so that you’ve come full circle and have given your body ample time to rest. This is the best workout for the individual who does not have time to spend two hours in the gym every day. The cardio exercise should be done after your strength workout. I prefer this for a couple of reasons. First, you will not be as tired for your strength training, for which it is important to be well rested. A second reason is sweat. After running on a treadmill or stair stepper for 30 minutes, your body’s sweat and salts are coming out of your pores, which makes for a more challenging weight workout. The bar may be slipping from your grasp; you’ll be sliding around in the machines, and so forth. So try to do weights first, then cardio. The only reason I recommend some people start with cardio is that those individuals are very tight and tell me that their muscles are cold in the morning. For these people, I think cardio beforehand may actually improve their workouts. It tends to make them more limber and gets the blood circulating around the body. 106

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SECTION FIVE: Week 10: Exercise

CALORIE BURNERS: ACTIVITIES THAT TURN UP THE HEAT By Susan Bowerman, M.S., R.D., C.S.S.D. When it comes to burning calories, most of us want to get as much mileage out of our exercise as possible. For many, the more calories we burn, the better we feel about our workout. While energy expenditure should not be the only measure of a good workout (remember, it’s good for you and it makes you feel better, too), it is helpful to know what a given activity might be costing you in terms of calories. A word of caution, though, about counting calories: Simply burning more calories will take you only so far down the road to better health. A well-balanced, low-fat diet, plenty of rest and a healthy attitude are also essential. And, of course, all things in moderation – including exercise. READING THE CHART The numbers of the chart on the next page correspond to how many calories individuals burn per hour during different activities. There are a few things you should keep in mind as you review this chart. With exercise, it really is true that you get out of it what you put into it. Simply showing up for class and going through the motions is not going to do you much good. To get the most out of your exercise session, give it your all, even if your all is less than what others might be doing. And don’t forget to look for little ways to increase the number of calories you burn each day. You might be surprised to learn that it is possible to burn more calories simply by becoming more active in your everyday life. Doing things like using the stairs, walking to the mailbox instead of driving, and doing active chores around the house are great ways to burn additional calories.

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SECTION FIVE: Week 10: Exercise

Calorie-Burning Activity Chart As an example for how to use this chart, look up how many calories you’re burning by engaging in different activities. The more active the exercise, the more calories you burn.

APPROXIMATE CALORIES/HOUR FOR A 154-POUND PERSON*

MODERATE PHYSICAL ACTIVITY Hiking

370

Light gardening/yard work

330

Dancing

330

Golf (walking and carrying clubs)

330

Bicycling (<10 mph)

290

Walking (3.5 mph)

280

Weight lifting (general light workout)

220

Stretching

180

APPROXIMATE CALORIES/HOUR FOR A 154-POUND PERSON*

VIGOROUS PHYSICAL ACTIVITY Running/jogging (5 mph)

590

Bicycling (>10 mph)

590

Swimming (slow freestyle laps)

510

Aerobics

480

Walking (4.5 mph)

460

Heavy yard work (chopping wood)

440

Weight lifting (vigorous effort)

440

Basketball (vigorous)

440

*Calories burned per hour will be higher for persons who weigh more than 154 pounds (70 kg), and lower for persons who weigh less. Adapted from: Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2005.

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SECTION FIVE: Week 10: Exercise

HOW MUCH DOES IT TAKE TO BURN IT OFF? Many people tend to overestimate the calories burned through exercise, and assume that a little exercise will burn off the calories in any indulgence. The chart below gives the calories in various foods, and the amount and type of exercise needed to burn off those calories. FOOD

AMOUNT

CALORIES

TO BURN IT OFF…

Chocolate drop

1 drop

25

6 minutes of walking

Microwave popcorn

4 cups

140

20 minutes of biking

Potato skins with cheese and bacon

1 average serving

1,100

187 minutes of dancing

Candy bar

1 bar

280

30 minutes of singles tennis

Chocolate fudge brownie ice cream

1½ cups

780

90 minutes of playing racquetball

Potato chips

1 ounce

160

90 minutes of playing Frisbee

Stuffed crust pizza

2 slices

1,000

2½ hours of ice skating

Chocolate frosted donut

1 donut

360

1 hour of playing baseball

Mocha frappuccino with whipped cream

16 ounces

380

130 minutes of playing billiards

Pumpkin pie with whipped cream

1 slice

350

30 minutes jumping rope

Stuffing with gravy

1 cup stuffing, ½ cup gravy

425

100 minutes golfing (no cart)

Chocolate chip cookies

4 small

400

120 minutes of bowling

Mixed nuts

½ cups

435

165 minutes of dusting

Macaroni and cheese

1 cup

430

45 minutes of stair-climbing

Pecan pie

1 slice

500

60 minutes of swimming

Eggnog

1 cup

350

52 minutes of playing half-court basketball

Double burger with fries

1 burger & large fries

1,100

2 hours of jogging

Ranch dressing

2 tablespoons

150

30 minutes of doing aerobics

Mayonnaise

1 tablespoon

100

22 minutes of brisk walking

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SECTION FIVE: Week 10: Exercise

EXERCISE FOR BODY AND MIND By Luigi Gratton, M.D., M.P.H.

There are so many benefits to exercise, and every day, we are discovering new ones. A recent Newsweek article discussed how exercise can boost brain power and fight off diseases like Alzheimer’s – more incredible information in an already long list of benefits. new research in animal models has shown that exercise stimulates a hormone called IgF-I or insulin such as growth factor-I, which, in turn, goes to the brain to stimulate another brain-derived-neutrotrophic factor (BDnF). BDnF is believed to facilitate a process in which an animal’s brain nerve cells branch out and communicate with each other. In fact, research has supported that theory that a brain with lower levels of BDnF is challenged with retaining new information. How amazing is exercise – not only does it build the body, but the mind as well! Exercise not only slows the aging process in the brain, but reverses it. Research has also shown that active adults have less inflammation in the brain and fewer transient ischemic attacks, or ministrokes, which can impair cognition. People who exercise regularly tend to have higher levels of neurotransmitters that regulate mood, such as serotonin, dopamine and norepinepherine. With so many people on psychotropic medication, exercise is proving to be an inexpensive method of maintaining mental health. As with the body’s muscle mass, the same holds true for the brain: Use it or lose it. Within just a short month of stopping physical activity, the new brain tissue connections that were formed basically shrink down back to normal. Many parents of children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) already know the benefits of physical activity on their children. It tends to help regulate their moods. An exercise prescription can often be given in conjunction with medication for these ADHD children/or may even replace a medication regimen. This has broad-ranging implications for children in school and their curriculum. With so many schools having downsized the number of physical education classes with a focus on more class time, this could be detrimental. That extra time on the playground may actually boost test scores in all children. The great thing about introducing physical education at an early age in school is that it sets the tone for future exercise. Once a healthy habit like exercise is established, it tends to carry on. When people understand the importance, it becomes even more of a regular routine. So, we know the benefits of exercise for all types of health. not only does exercise help with chronic conditions, it also promotes wellness.

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SECTION FIVE: Week 10: Exercise

FITTING IN FITNESS



Take the stairs instead of the elevator or escalator, for at least a few floors. If you have to take the escalator, make it a point to walk it.



Walk or bike to nearby destinations instead of always driving.



When at the mall, park your car farthest from where you intend to shop.



get off the bus a few blocks early, or park a few blocks from work.



Exercise while watching television, especially during commercials.



Hide your remote control and get up to change TV channels or adjust the volume.



Busy yourself with housework, such as vacuuming, washing the floors, polishing furniture or washing the windows.



Take the dog for a walk.



Work in the garden or yard – raking the leaves or sweeping the patio.



go for a short walk before breakfast and after dinner.



Spend half your lunch hour eating and the other half walking around the building or parking lot. get your coworkers to join you.



Walk up and down the stairs on your breaks at work.



Several times a day, take a few moments to move around and stretch your legs, regardless of what you’re doing.



When on your cell phone or cordless home phone, walk around while you talk.



Clean up the garage or organize your closets or kitchen cupboards.



go shopping. You don’t have to buy anything, just walk the aisles and look at the items.

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SECTION FIVE: Week 11: Heart Health

DO YOU HAVE THE HEART OF A CHAMPION? By Luigi Gratton, M.D., M.P.H. Want to enjoy a long, active life full of energy and vitality? You’ll have to put your heart into it. Maintaining a strong, healthy cardiovascular system is essential to your overall health and quality of life. So why wait? Start making life choices today that will give you the heart of a champion – and the life of a winner. Here are a few ideas to get you started: 1. STEP UP YOUR GAME get your body moving. Studies show that moderate physical activity can strengthen the heart. Regular exercise – jogging, weight lifting, playing sports – is key to a healthy heart and a rich and fulfilling life. not interested in playing sports or joining a gym? Try walking. Taking 6,000 to 10,000 steps every day is terrific for your heart. A pedometer, available at any sporting-goods store, can help you keep track of your steps throughout the day. Try different types of exercise, find the ones you really enjoy, and make them a regular part of your life. 2. EAT LIKE A WINNER Forget the fast food. Junk the junk food. Create a heart-healthy diet. That means healthy protein, healthy fatty acids like Omega-3s, lots of water and plenty of fruits and vegetables. The way you eat is important, too. So don’t skip meals. Schedule regular times for meals and snacks. And try not to eat anything within a few hours of going to bed. 3. REST, RECHARGE AND REJUVENATE And speaking of going to bed… it’s time to get some shut-eye. Sleep deprivation has been linked to an increased risk of heart problems. We’re busy people, and it can be tempting to shave off an hour or two of sleep to “be more productive.” Resist that temptation. Think of it this way: For eight hours of every day of your life, the most productive activity you can engage in for your health is sleeping. So, have a good night – and you’ll have a great life.

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SECTION FIVE: Week 11: Heart Health

HEART OF THE MATTER By Luigi Gratton, M.D., M.P.H.

There are nearly 100,000 miles of arteries, veins and capillaries in your body. They allow nutrient-rich blood to nourish the cells and organs of your body. But when they’re blocked, it can result in heart attack or stroke, the #1 and #3 leading causes of death in the United States. Obesity is a major risk factor for heart disease. Your heart health alone is reason enough to lose any extra weight you’re carrying. But is there anything else you can do to support your heart health? Take a closer look at the food choices you’re making. It’s also important to eat enough protein to maintain or build your lean muscle mass, and watch your intake of “good fats” and “bad fats.” Fish is a good source of Omega-3 fatty acids – “good fats” that are essential for heart health. COLORFUL CHOICES Make sure to include plenty of colorful fruits and vegetables in a nutrient-rich diet. Some foods are considered particularly heart healthy – garlic, almonds and certain fruits and vegetables. A great way to choose your fruits and vegetables is to use color as a guide. In general, the deeper the color, the more nutrient rich it is. Different colors indicate variety of nutrients. See the chart below for the phytonutrients each provides. SUPPLEMENTATION It’s often difficult to get all the nutrients you need from your diet alone, especially when you’re watching portion sizes and calories. And with our busy lifestyles, we’re often tempted to reach for fast food, which is often unhealthy food. That’s why so many people have discovered the benefits of supplementation. If you’re not meeting your daily requirements through food, supplements can fill in the gaps in your diet, insuring that you’re getting all the nutrients you need. Losing weight is one of the most important steps you can take for your cardiovascular health. But don’t stop there. Make sure you’re doing everything you can – eat right, exercise, get regular checkups and take supplements.

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Orange-yellow (terpenoids, Vitamin C)

Oranges, tangerines, peaches, papayas, nectarines

Orange (alpha- and beta-carotene)

Carrots, mangos, apricots, acorn squash, cantaloupes, pumpkin, winter squash, sweet potatoes

Red-purple (anthocyanidins, resveratrol)

Red grapes, fresh plums, cranberries, raspberries, blackberries, blueberries, strawberries

Red (lycopene)

Tomatoes and tomato products, pink grapefruit, watermelon

Yellow-green (lutein)

Spinach, avocado, honeydew melon, collard greens, mustard greens, yellow corn, green peas

Green (glucosinolates)

Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, Chinese cabbage, bok choy

White-green (allyl sulfides)

Garlic, chives, onions, celery, leeks, asparagus

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SECTION FIVE: Week 11: Heart Health

HEART TO HEART By Lou Ignarro, Ph.D.

HEART HEALTH: A GLOBAL CONCERN Heart disease is the #1 killer of Americans today. According to the American Heart Association’s estimates, 1.2 million Americans will have a first or recurrent heart attack in 2008; approximately 452,000 will die as a result. Worldwide, heart disease kills approximately 17 million people per year – that’s almost one-third of all deaths globally. The Atlas of Heart Disease and Stroke, released by the World Health Organization, estimates that by 2020, heart disease and stroke will be the leading cause of both death and disability, with the number of fatalities projected to increase to more than 20 million a year. In Mexico, heart disease has been the leading cause of death for the last 20 years, while in Europe, cardiovascular disease kills 4 million people each year. About half of the world’s cases of cardiovascular disease occur in the Asia Pacific region; 1.3 million people die of cardiovascular disease annually in Russia; and, according to a study released by the New England Journal of Medicine, cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in China. While these statistics paint a bleak picture, they also present a huge opportunity to promote the benefits of a healthy, active lifestyle. When I think about optimal cardiovascular health, here’s what comes to mind: • •

Maintaining a healthy weight Making sure you get lots of antioxidants from your diet (fruits and vegetables) and through supplementation Participating in some form of aerobic exercise on a daily basis Making sure you are well hydrated and get plenty of sleep – much of the repair and regenerative work of the body occurs while we sleep

• •

Additionally, taking Herbalife® niteworks® dietary supplement powder mix helps promote nitric Oxide (nO) levels and maintain blood pressure in the normal range.* Herbalife® Core Complex softgels target four key indicators of heart health: cholesterol, triglycerides, homocysteine and oxidative stress.*

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

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SECTION FIVE: Week 11: Heart Health

CARDIOVASCULAR HEALTH Q & A With Lou Ignarro, Ph.D.

Q: WHY IS CARDIOVASCULAR HEALTH SO IMPORTANT? A: Your cardiovascular system is literally at the heart of your overall health. Maintaining it is crucial for a variety of reasons. It gives you energy and the ability to keep up with the daily demands of life. A healthy cardiovascular system is also essential for mental clarity and protecting you against stress. Additionally, cardiovascular health contributes to overall vitality. Q: WHAT KINDS OF THINGS CAN I DO TO IMPROVE MY CARDIOVASCULAR HEALTH? A: There are several things you can – and should – incorporate into your life to maintain a healthy cardiovascular system. Exercise is crucial. Brisk walks, sit-ups, light weight training, swimming and biking are all excellent, low-impact and efficient exercises for any fitness level. The important thing is to do something every day. Another important factor is proper eating–and that means getting the right amount of essential vitamins and other nutrients, as well as antioxidants. Q: HOW DOES HERBALIFE ® CORE COMPLEX HELP IMPROVE HEART HEALTH? A: Herbalife® Core Complex targets four key indicators of heart health: cholesterol, triglycerides, homocysteine and oxidative stress. Taking Core Complex is a great way to give your cardiovascular system the nutrition it needs every day. Whatever you do to maintain a healthy cardiovascular system, the important thing to remember is to make it a priority. Exercise regularly, eat right and keep stress to a minimum. Your health depends on it.

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SECTION FIVE: Week 11: Heart Health

TAKE GOOD HEALTH TO HEART Q & A With Luigi Gratton, M.D., M.P.H.

Q: WHAT IS ALPHA LIPOIC ACID, AND HOW DOES IT SUPPORT THE HEART? A: Alpha lipoic acid (ALA), an ingredient in Herbalife® niteworks®, is a potent antioxidant first discovered in the 1950s and later recognized in 1988 for a variety of health-promoting activities. ALA works in the mitochondria, the body’s energy-producing cells, where it has been shown to protect the DnA from damage. Many antioxidants, like Vitamin C, work well in areas of the body where there is water, while others, like Vitamin E, work well in areas of fat. ALA has the unique capability to work in both water and fat, and, moreover, helps to recycle our natural Vitamins C and E. In the heart, ALA helps protect the cardiovascular system from free radical damage. Q: IF NITRIC OXIDE IS A GAS, WHY DOES NITEWORKS ® COME IN POWDER FORM? A: Herbalife developed niteworks®, informed by the research of Dr. Lou Ignarro, a nobel† Laureate in Medicine. Dr. Ignarro’s research showed that nitric Oxide helps to keep blood vessels toned, flexible and youthful for improved circulation. His research further showed that nitric Oxide enhances blood flow, supporting function of the heart, brain and other organs. His additional research has shown that the combination of two amino acids, arginine and citrulline, helps to support nitric Oxide production in the body. Herbalife developed niteworks® as a powder with these two amino acids. This product also contains alpha lipoic acid and Vitamin E for antioxidant protection.* Q: HOW DOES GARLIC CONTRIBUTE TO CARDIOVASCULAR HEALTH? A: garlic has long been recognized as a high-quality supplement to support healthy circulation and a healthy heart. One of the key active components is called allicin, which helps to support cholesterollowering, antioxidant, blood-thinning and antimicrobial activities. garlic supplements should be specially coated to be effective because stomach acid inhibits activity. Herbalife developed Mega garlic Plus with an enteric coating to safely pass through the stomach for full absorption.

†The

nobel Foundation has no affiliation with Herbalife and does not review, approve or endorse Herbalife® products. *These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

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SECTION FIVE: Week 12: Maintenance, Long-Term Wellness

TIPS FOR STAYING ACTIVE By Luigi Gratton, M.D., M.P.H.

Here are some simple strategies for enjoying a healthy, active lifestyle outdoors. 1. DRINK PLENTY OF WATER When it comes to physical activity, don’t forget the importance of water. You’ve probably heard this a hundred times, but there’s a reason for it. Your body uses water in almost every function, including the process of burning fat. Water helps every cell and organ in your body work. It cushions your joints, and helps keep your body cool. Water also helps flush toxins out of your system and rehydrates the body. Plan ahead. Make sure to carry a water bottle and hydrate with water or a fitness drink. Drink before, during and after physical activity to replace the water you lose when you sweat. Even a small water deficiency can affect how you perform, so drink up! 2. TRACK YOUR PROGRESS Keep a journal of your physical activity to chart your progress. Whether you’re interested in losing weight, building muscle or just getting active again, keeping a log will help motivate you. Record all the information for each workout, including time, intensity and performance. It’s a good idea to record your baseline measurements and find out your body-fat percentage, so you can set attainable weight-loss goals. You may not feel like you’re making progress, but when you look back at where you started, you may be pleasantly surprised. Remember that small steps matter. Tracking even a slight amount of improvement on paper will inspire you to keep going with confidence. 3. PROTECT YOUR SKIN AND HAIR Do you play sports or spend time working out at the beach? Being outdoors means being exposed to the elements, such as sun, wind and pollution. For example, it’s a good idea to wear sunscreen and a hat to protect your skin and hair. Use products that help repair damage from daily environmental stresses and that can help protect your skin and hair from the elements. For example, Herbalife® nouriFusion® skincare line is great for daily cleansing, toning and moisturizing, while Herbalife® Skin Activator® anti-aging skincare helps protect skin and correct the signs of aging.

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SECTION FIVE: Week 12: Maintenance, Long-Term Wellness

KEEP FITNESS ON TRACK By Luigi Gratton, M.D., M.P.H.

Chances are you or someone you know is resolving to lose weight or get in shape. Part of what makes these such difficult resolutions is that we expect to see results quickly, and when we don’t, we tend to give up. getting in shape and becoming healthier isn’t a sprint; it’s a marathon (but without all the sweating and fatigue of an actual marathon). Staying active, maintaining a healthy weight and eating the right foods are lifelong activities. Here are some ideas to help you make living fit a part of your life: 1. GET SPECIFIC The more detail you include in your plan, the better your chances of success. If you’ve decided to simply “exercise” and “eat better,” you might not have the success you’d hoped. That’s because “exercise” isn’t a specific plan. Set aside 25 minutes each morning, say between 6:45 and 7:10, to stretch, walk or jog around the block – whatever. Just be specific. To eat better, schedule specific healthy meals and snacks for specific times throughout the day. 2. MAKE IT ROUTINE One effective way to introduce a new behavior is to make it part of your day. For exercise, set up a routine – maybe a walk around your neighborhood each morning. If you’ve resolved to lose weight, replace lunch with a healthy protein shake every day. The key is to establish a routine of things you do at specific times. The sooner it becomes part of your day, the sooner it will become part of your life. 3. CELEBRATE YOUR SUCCESSES If you create specific plans for exercise and healthier eating, and you make them part of your daily routine, chances are you’ll be seeing positive results. Celebrate! You’ve earned it. Treat yourself to something you’ve been wanting to do – instead of splurging on unhealthy foods. And a reward, like taking yourself out to a movie or pampering yourself with a trip to a spa, is a great motivator to keep the good results coming.

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SECTION FIVE: Week 12: Maintenance, Long-Term Wellness

TIP THE SCALE IN YOUR FAVOR



Since restaurant portions are usually large, ask the server to put half your meal in a “doggie bag” before it’s served to you. That way, you’ll eat less, but still have the satisfaction of cleaning your plate.



If after-dinner snacking is a problem for you, try brushing your teeth after dinner. It works as a great signal to stop eating.



If your entrée at a restaurant is served with the typical “starch and vegetable,” ask to omit the starch and double the vegetables instead. Vegetable side dishes are usually small, so this will help to increase your day’s intake.



Afternoon snacking is a tough time for people – but there often is a long stretch between lunch and dinner, and so snacking may be appropriate. Use this time to have a “second lunch”, and have something a little more substantial like an Herbalife® Formula 1 shake, a cup of cottage cheese with some fruit. Then do your cutting back at dinner time.



Breakfast foods often include items that might be lacking the rest of the day – whole grains for fiber, dairy products for calcium, and fruit. An Herbalife® Formula 1 shake (made with fruit) and a slice of whole-grain toast helps to meet a lot of your nutritional needs and starts the day off right.



Coffeehouse fanatics beware – some of those coffee drinks are low in nutrition and high in calories. Try a nonfat latte, which provides a full serving of dairy and about 10 grams of protein, and couple it with a piece of fresh fruit for a quick, nourishing breakfast.



Add fruits to your salad for a change. Try fresh orange or tangerine sections, apples or kiwi. The sweet fruits go well with tangy vinaigrette dressings. Use deep-green leafy vegetables, too – instead of iceberg lettuce – for more nutrition.



Frozen vegetables and fruits can be just as nutritious as fresh, may be less expensive, and allow you to eat foods that might not be in season that time of the year. For example, loose-leaf frozen spinach or chopped vegetables can easily be added to soups and stews.



Try not to rely on fats, sugar and salt to flavor foods. Instead, try grated lemon, lime or orange zest on fruits, vegetables, fish or chicken, and experiment with herbs, spices, onions and garlic in your dishes.



Calories in cold beverages like sodas, juices and juice drinks can add up fast. Instead, try sparkling mineral water with a slice of lemon or lime or a tiny splash of juice for flavor. Tomato or mixed vegetable juices are filling, nutritious and low calorie. W

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SECTION FIVE: Week 12: Maintenance, Long-Term Wellness

TIP THE SCALE IN YOUR FAVOR (CONTINUED)

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Find an exercise buddy to work out with and who will commit to a regimen with you. If you walk together, for example, you and your buddy can take each other’s shoes home with you. You’ll be obligated to show up for your next workout!



Regular exercise will induce better sleep at night. You’ll get into deeper sleep stages more quickly, so you feel more rested in the morning. You might even be able to sleep a little less, and use the extra time to work out.



need more fiber? Load sandwiches up with lots of veggies, including lettuce, tomato, cucumber and sprouts, and use 100 percent whole-grain bread.



Make a hummus spread in the blender with garbanzo beans and a touch of olive oil, lemon juice, salt, pepper and garlic and use as a sandwich filling or a replacement for mayonnaise.



Try to balance animal protein with vegetarian protein sources. Formula 1 contains healthy soy protein. Try marinating firm tofu slices in teriyaki sauce and then roasting in the oven. The tofu gets dense and meaty, and is great tossed into a salad, as a sandwich filling in a whole-grain pita bread, or as an entrée with brown rice and veggies.



It’s true – using smaller plates will help you to control portions. Foods take up more room on smaller plates and will make you think you have a larger portion than you actually do.



Another portion control tip: no matter what you are eating, put it on a plate. Don’t sit down with a bag of chips, a box of crackers or a can of mixed nuts – you’re bound to overeat. Determine ahead of time what your portion is going to be, then put it on a plate or in a bowl.



Current recommendations for exercise are that we should accumulate 30 minutes of activity per day. Don’t have enough time? Break it up into two or three shorter sessions. Take a short walk at lunch, one at break time and another one after dinner.



For a change from canned tuna, try canned salmon. It’s wild – not farmed – and makes a nice change for a sandwich. It makes a great burger, too: Mix flaked canned salmon with some minced onions and peppers, some bread crumbs and egg whites, shape into patties and grill on both sides before placing on a whole-grain bun.



Boost the nutritional value of canned soups by mixing with nonfat milk or soy milk instead of water.

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SECTION FIVE: Week 12: Maintenance, Long-Term Wellness

As the soup is heating, toss in some frozen mixed vegetables, or some loose-packed spinach to add nutrition, flavor and bulk. ●

Try mixing canned tuna with mashed avocado instead of mayonnaise for a tasty sandwich filling. Avocado has less fat per tablespoon than mayo, and the fat it contains is heart healthy.



You can reduce the fat in homemade baked goods by replacing half the fat in the recipe with applesauce, plain yogurt or baby food peaches. Peaches match well with quick breads, and yogurt and applesauce work well in spicy treats like coffeecakes.



Make it a goal to try new healthy foods on a regular basis. Visit your local farmers or ethnic markets to find new foods such as different fruits, vegetables or whole-grain products. Keeping your meals healthy and interesting will keep you on track.



Read nutrition labels carefully. All the nutrition and calorie information given is for one serving, not one package. Beverage containers can have two to three servings; small bags of snack foods are often several servings, too. That bag of pretzels you thought had 140 calories could have closer to 500.



Stay hydrated throughout the day and pay particular attention to fluid intake after exercising. Weigh yourself before and after a workout. For every pound of weight lost, drink two to three cups of water to replace the fluids you lost during activity.



Whole grains are important, but many side dishes require long cooking times. So, try foods that take less time such as quick brown rice, quinoa or whole-wheat couscous.



You can eat healthy even if you’re on the run. Try to steer away from the fast-food burgers and more toward deli-style chains for healthier, lighter sandwiches and wraps, or Mexican-style grills for soft tacos, fajitas and salads.



Keeping a journal of your food intake and exercise is a great tool. Even better, try to pre-plan your meals and exercise into your daily journal – you’ll feel more committed that way.



Protein powders are great in protein shakes, but you can also add them to other foods. For a high-protein breakfast alternative, cook rolled oats in nonfat milk or soy milk, and stir some vanilla-flavored protein powder into the cooked cereal. The extra protein will provide staying power all the way until lunch. W

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SECTION FIVE: Week 12: Maintenance, Long-Term Wellness

THE DECIDING FACTOR

Sometimes we don’t realize that we have mixed feelings about making behavior changes. Take a few minutes to think about and list the benefits and drawbacks of changing your nutritional habits and losing weight. Here are some examples: BENEFIT OF NOT MAKING CHANGES I can keep eating the way I want without having to work on making any changes in my life. BENEFIT OF MAKING CHANGES I won’t have to worry about the health risks of being inactive and eating poorly. DRAWBACK OF NOT MAKING CHANGES If I don’t make changes now, things might get worse. DRAWBACK OF MAKING CHANGES It might be hard for me to get support from my family and friends to do this. They’re used to me the way I am. now rate each of your answers on a scale of 1 to 5: 1 2 3 4 5

= = = = =

Not important Somewhat important Important Very important Extremely important

After doing this exercise, can you see why making a decision is an important factor in losing weight?

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SECTION FIVE: Week 12: Maintenance, Long-Term Wellness

CALCIUM CHALLENGE Not Just for Your Bones

Most people associate the mineral calcium with healthy bones. And a lot of people also think that adequate calcium intake is more of a concern for women than it is for men. While it’s true that the primary function of calcium in the body is to maintain healthy bone structure, you may not know that calcium performs many important functions for everybody. Calcium helps muscles contract, helps blood to clot, helps the nervous system to function properly, and is important in maintaining healthy blood pressure. Many people do not take in the recommended intake of calcium from foods. Some people don’t like dairy products, or think they are fattening, (Some products, like cheese, are high in calories and fat, and certain yogurts are high in calories because of the sugar content.) Other people think “milk is for kids.” And some people cannot tolerate the sugar in milk (called lactose) so they shy away from dairy products. The good news is that calcium is found in other foods besides dairy products. But even so, most people have a hard time meeting the recommendation of 1,000 mg for men and women up to the age of 50, and 1,200 mg per day for people age 50 and up. This is where supplements can help to meet your needs – not as a replacement for a poor diet, but as a way to supplement a nutritionally well-balanced one. This week’s challenge is for you to keep track of your calcium intake and see how it compares to the recommendation. Look at the food and supplement sources in the chart on the next page. It lists the amount of calcium per serving. Located after the chart is a log for you to record the foods and drinks you consume that contain calcium. Pay attention to how much calcium you get compared with how many calories the food has. Keep a list for three separate days, and add up your total intake. If you fall short of the recommendation, see how you can increase your intake from foods and supplements to meet your needs.

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SECTION FIVE: Week 12: Maintenance, Long-Term Wellness

CALCIUM CHALLENGE Not Just for Your Bones (CONTINUED)

Food Source

Serving Size

Calories

Calcium per Serving

Yogurt, plain, low-fat

1 cup

140

450 mg

Milk, nonfat or low-fat

1 cup

90–120

350 mg

Soy milk, plain, fortified

1 cup

100

300 mg

Collard/turnip greens

1 cup

60

300 mg

Cooked spinach

1 cup

40

230 mg

Yogurt, fruit flavored

1 cup

250

200 mg

Okra

1 cup

50

170 mg

1 ounce (1 stick)

1 ounce (1 stick)

150 mg

Cottage cheese, low-fat

1 cup

150

140 mg

Some fortified cereals

Varies

Varies

100 mg or more

Herbalife® Formula 1 nutritional Shake Mix

2 scoops

90

80 mg

Herbalife® Formula 2 Multivitamin Complex

1 tablet

-

167 mg

Herbalife® Xtra-Cal® Advanced

1 tablet

-

334 mg

Cheese, low-fat mozzarella

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SECTION FIVE: Week 12: Maintenance, Long-Term Wellness

DAY 1: I need WHAT I ATE

mg of calcium per day SERVING SIZE

CALCIUM PER SERVING

TOTAL CALCIUM FOR THE DAY:

DAY 2: I need WHAT I ATE

mg of calcium per day SERVING SIZE

CALCIUM PER SERVING

TOTAL CALCIUM FOR THE DAY:

DAY 3: I need WHAT I ATE

mg of calcium per day SERVING SIZE

CALCIUM PER SERVING

TOTAL CALCIUM FOR THE DAY:

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SECTION FIVE: Week 12: Maintenance, Long-Term Wellness

WEIGHT LOSS CHALLENGE FEEDBACK FORM Dear Weight Loss Challenge Participant, Congratulations on completing the 12-week Weight Loss Challenge course! We hope you have learned things that will help you achieve your desired weight-loss and nutritional goals. Please help us improve our delivery of Weight Loss Challenge materials for future challenges by completing this feedback form. We wish you continued success as you work toward your own personal wellness.

Sincerely, The Weight Loss Challenge Team

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WHAT I EXPECTED:

WHAT I GOT:

WHAT I VALUED:

WHAT I WOULD CHANGE:

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APPENDIX A: Taking good Measurements

TAKING GOOD MEASUREMENTS

Upper Chest Chest

Right Arm Left Arm Waist Hips

Right Thigh

Left Thigh

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APPENDIX B: Products by Week

PRODUCTS BY WEEK

Topic

Product Samples

Product Focus

Week 1

Protein

Protein Bars Deluxe (all flavors)

Advanced program with Personalized Protein Powder

Week 2

Meal Plans; Snacking; Water

Formula 1 shakes or pies

Formula 1 Healthy Meal Nutritional Shake Mix, Personalized Protein Powder, H30®, Cell-U-Loss®

Week 3

Metabolism

Total Control®

Herbal Tea Concentrate, Total Control®, Snack Defense®

Week 4

Carbohydrates; Shopping and Cooking; Cellular Nutrition

Peach Mango Beverage Mix or Creamy Soup Mix

Formula 1 Healthy Meal Nutritional Shake Mix, Herbalife protein snacks (e.g., Beverage Mix, Protein Drink Mix, Protein Bar, Protein Bar Deluxe), Formula 3 Cell Activator®

Week 5

Nutrition Labels; Fats; Portion Control

Mixed nuts (almonds, walnuts, cashews) Herbalifeline®, Core Complex, Thermo-Bond®

Week 6

Digestive Health

Formula 1 shake with Herbal Aloe

21-Day Herbal Cleansing Program, Herbal Aloe liquid or powder

Week 7

Dining Out

Formula 1 pies or bars

Thermo-Bond®, Aminogen®*, Snack Defense®

Week 8

Fiber

Active Fiber Complex in juice or in Formula 1 shakes

Active Fiber Complex, Florafiber

Week 9

Sugar

Protein Bars or Beverage Mix

Snack Defense®, Formula 1 Healthy Meal Nutritional Shake Mix, Kids Shakes, Beverage Mix

Week 10

Exercise

H30® or Liftoff®

Aminogen®, H30®, Liftoff®, Relax Now, Sleep Now

Week 11

Heart Health

Niteworks®

Niteworks®, Core Complex, Herbalifeline®, Tri-Shield®

Week 12

Maintenance; Long-Term Wellness

Maple-pecan bars made with Formula 1

Cellular Nutrition products (Formula 1 Healthy Meal Nutritional Shake Mix, Formula 2 Multivitamin Complex, Formula 3 Cell Activator®), Garden 7®, RoseGuard, Schizandra Plus, Xtra-Cal® Advanced

*Aminogen® is a registered trademark of Triarco Industries, Inc., and is protected by U.S. Patent no. 5,387,422.

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APPENDIX C: Wellness Questionnaire

WELLNESS QUESTIONNAIRE

1.

Do you eat more meals with poultry, lean meat, fish and plant (soy) proteins rather than steaks, roasts and other red meats?

2.

Do you eat a variety of colorful fruits and vegetables, and do you eat at least seven servings a day of these?

3.

Do you consume primarily whole grains (100% whole-wheat bread and pasta, brown rice) rather than regular pasta, white rice and white bread?

4.

Do you eat ocean-caught fish at least three times a week?

5.

Do you avoid the intake of fried foods, dressings, sauces, gravies, butter and margarine?

6.

Is your digestive system free of indigestion or irregularity?

7.

Do you get a minimum of 30 minutes of exercise three to five days a week?

8.

Do you maintain a stable and appropriate weight?

9.

Do you usually have time to prepare balanced meals, rather than take-out or eating on the run?

10.

Do you stay away from soda and typical snack foods throughout the day and after dinner?

11.

Are you free of water retention and bloating?

12.

Do you have the energy and focus you need to meet your daily challenges?

13.

Do you drink at least eight glasses of water a day?

14.

Are you getting your daily recommended allowance of calcium? a. Men = 1,000 mg b. Women under 50 = 1,200 mg c. Women 50 and older = 1,500 mg

15.

Are your blood pressure, triglycerides and bad cholesterol levels in the normal range?

16a. Men: Are you free from problems associated with your prostate such as slow urination or waking up at night to urinate? 16b. Women: Are you free from problems associated with your menstrual cycle/menopause such as mood changes, hot flashes or problems sleeping?

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APPENDIX C: Wellness Questionnaire

WELLNESS QUESTIONNAIRE How did you answer?

1. Do you eat more meals with poultry, lean meat, fish and plant (soy) proteins rather than steaks, roasts and other red meats? White meat of chicken or turkey and ocean-caught fish provide less fat and saturated fat than most cuts of red meat or pork. It is important to eat more of these “better-for-you” meats rather than high-fat meats such as hot dogs, steaks and roasts, and to balance your proteins by eating some plant proteins such as soy every day. 2. Do you eat a variety of colorful fruits and vegetables, and do you eat at least seven servings a day of these? It is important to eat at least seven servings per day of fruits and vegetables to get the fiber, vitamins and minerals these foods contain. Eat a wide range of different-colored fruits and vegetables to get a variety of the thousands of substances only found in plants that help keep you healthy. 3. Do you consume primarily whole grains (100% whole-wheat bread and pasta, brown rice) rather than regular pasta, white rice and white bread? Processed and refined grains provide mainly starch as empty calories. It is important to get wholegrain baked goods so that you get all the goodness from whole grains including the vitamins, fiber and protein found in these important foods. 4. Do you eat ocean-caught fish at least three times a week? Ocean-caught fish have healthy fish oils that can help to reduce the risk of heart disease when eaten as part of a healthy diet. They are also generally lower in fat than other meats and can help you maintain a healthy body weight. 5. Do you avoid the intake of fried foods, dressings, sauces, gravies, butter and margarine? Fried foods, dressings, gravies, sauces, butter and margarine add lots of calories and saturated fat to your diet even when eaten in small amounts. Since it is difficult to control the portions you eat, it is best to avoid these foods as much as possible. 6. Is your digestive system free of indigestion or irregularity? Being regular is important in order to eliminate toxins from your body, and healthy elimination can maintain a normal balance of cholesterol and other blood fats. Indigestion or irregularity can be avoided by eating 25 grams of fiber per day from fruits, vegetables and whole grains, drinking six to eight glasses of water per day and reducing stress through mild exercise or meditation. 7. Do you get a minimum of 30 minutes of exercise three to five days a week? getting exercise that stimulates your heart at least three to five days per week for a least 30 minutes will help keep your cardiovascular system healthy, help maintain a healthy body weight and can help reduce stress. 8. Do you maintain a stable and appropriate weight? Maintaining a healthy and appropriate weight can be achieved with regular exercise and by following a diet that is based on low-fat proteins, fruits, vegetables and controlled portions of 130

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APPENDIX C: Wellness Questionnaire

whole-grain foods. Many people go through cycles of weight gain followed by quick weight loss, which can lead to loss of lean tissue and reduced metabolic rate. 9. Do you usually have time to prepare balanced meals, rather than take-out or eating on the run? With our busy lives, it is tempting to pick up prepared foods or fast foods, and we often eat while we are doing other activities. there are many convenience items, such as prewashed salad greens, frozen vegetables, precut fruits and quick-cooking poultry portions that make healthy meals quick to put together. 10. Do you stay away from soda and typical snack foods throughout the day and after dinner? snacking on healthy fruits and vegetables is one thing, but high-fat, high-sugar treats are foods people may turn to out of stress, boredom or habit. try replacing these foods with healthier snacks, or enjoy a hot cup of tea to help you relieve stress. 11. Are you free of water retention and bloating? excess weight can sometimes simply be retained water. Bloating and swollen ring fingers are clues that this may be happening, and it is important to maintain normal water balance. 12. Do you have the energy and focus you need to meet your daily challenges? We all want to perform at our best during the day. Regular exercise and stress management can help you sleep better and feel rested and energized for the day. 13. Do you drink at least eight glasses of water a day? if you wait until you are thirsty before you drink water, you may already be slightly dehydrated. Your body requires water for many functions, and being well hydrated helps keep your skin and other tissues healthy. 14. Are you getting your daily recommended allowance of calcium? a. Men = 1,000 mg b. Women under 50 = 1,200 mg c. Women 50 and older = 1,500 mg Calcium is important for bone health, and also helps to keep blood pressure in check. the best dietary sources are nonfat dairy products and calcium-fortified foods. since most people don’t eat enough servings of dairy products daily, a combination of foods and supplements is often needed. 15. Are your blood pressure, triglycerides and bad cholesterol levels in the normal range? elevated blood pressure, triglycerides and cholesterol can put you at risk for cardiovascular disease. Regular exercise and a low-fat diet rich in plant foods, fiber and healthy fats from fish can help control these factors. 16a. Men: Are you free from problems associated with your prostate such as slow urination or waking up at night to urinate? Waking up to urinate is a symptom indicating that prostate enlargement may be affecting the ability to completely empty the bladder at night. slow urination or a weak stream is another indication that the prostate may be enlarged. 16b. Women: Are you free from problems associated with your menstrual cycle/menopause such as mood changes, hot flashes or problems sleeping? sleep disturbances and hot flashes are indications of the effects of hormone changes with menopause in women over 50 years of age. Menstrual cycle symptoms occur in the last 10 days of the month due to changes in hormone levels and include swelling, mood changes and breast tenderness.

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Weight Loss Challenge M A N U W h a t d o yo u h a v e t o Lo s e? ©2011 Herbalife International of America, Inc. All rights reserved. Printed in...

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